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Old 10-14-2017, 09:12 PM   #1
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Propylene Glycol flavoring: does it work?

Hello, everyone, I was excited when I found out about PG flavorings and the sheer variety i found. However, I've been nothing but disappointed. I've tried two companies' products touted as being super concentrated so far and have used the entire 10-13 oz. in white and milk chocolate as well as homemade buttercream filling. My wife used a whole thing for a batch of frosting with the same results - no detectable flavor. My coworkers have told me the same thing about the test batches I've brought in. The most recent recipe I've tried is here: https://www.landolakes.com/recipe/16811/buttercreams/. I use only 2 cups of sugar though.

Are there just lousy brands of PG flavorings? Am I just not using them right? Has anyone had success with them? Thanks in advance, I just joined this site and will have a lot to talk about I'm sure haha

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Old 10-15-2017, 05:34 AM   #2
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Wow, antifreeze has made its way into the food world. BTW, don't let any dogs near it.
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Old 10-15-2017, 06:56 AM   #3
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Wow, antifreeze has made its way into the food world. BTW, don't let any dogs near it.
Ethylene glycol is used in antifreeze, not propylene glycol.
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Old 10-15-2017, 08:40 AM   #4
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Ethylene glycol is used in antifreeze, not propylene glycol.
You might want to double check on that.
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Old 10-15-2017, 08:46 AM   #5
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Antifreeze toxicity
Ethylene glycol poisoning is caused by the ingestion of ethylene glycol, the primary ingredient in automotive antifreeze. Ethylene glycol is a toxic, colorless, odorless, almost nonvolatile liquid with a sweet taste that is sometimes accidentally consumed by children and animals due to its sweetness.

====================

Propylene glycol, also called propane-1,2-diol, is a synthetic compound with the chemical formula C3H8O2. It is a viscous colorless liquid which is nearly odorless but possesses a faintly sweet taste. Chemically it is classed as a diol and is miscible with a broad range of solvents, including water, acetone, and chloroform.

It is produced on a large scale and is primarily used in the production of polymers, but also sees use in food processing, and as a process fluid in low temperature heat exchange applications. In the European Union, it has the E-number E1520 for food applications.
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Old 10-15-2017, 09:06 AM   #6
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Antifreeze toxicity
Ethylene glycol poisoning is caused by the ingestion of ethylene glycol, the primary ingredient in automotive antifreeze. Ethylene glycol is a toxic, colorless, odorless, almost nonvolatile liquid with a sweet taste that is sometimes accidentally consumed by children and animals due to its sweetness.

====================

Propylene glycol, also called propane-1,2-diol, is a synthetic compound with the chemical formula C3H8O2. It is a viscous colorless liquid which is nearly odorless but possesses a faintly sweet taste. Chemically it is classed as a diol and is miscible with a broad range of solvents, including water, acetone, and chloroform.

It is produced on a large scale and is primarily used in the production of polymers, but also sees use in food processing, and as a process fluid in low temperature heat exchange applications. In the European Union, it has the E-number E1520 for food applications.
Propylene Glycol is also used in antifreeze and coolant. Use the google!
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Old 10-15-2017, 09:14 AM   #7
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While I'm enjoying the chemistry discussion, I must respectfully ask again for any insight or experience regarding the use of PG flavorings in candies or baking. If they were unfit for human consumption I am fairly sure they would not be marketed as such, nor would the FDA allow it. Thank you for your time.
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Old 10-15-2017, 04:11 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
Ethylene glycol is used in antifreeze, not propylene glycol.
Propylene glycol is what I used to use to winterize my boat. It is non-toxic, so it won't hurt the lake in the spring. So, it is an anti-freeze, but apparently used for food, too. I never knew that before now.

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Old 10-15-2017, 04:15 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Bikeking8 View Post
While I'm enjoying the chemistry discussion, I must respectfully ask again for any insight or experience regarding the use of PG flavorings in candies or baking. If they were unfit for human consumption I am fairly sure they would not be marketed as such, nor would the FDA allow it. Thank you for your time.
Well, as I mentioned, I had never heard of using it in food, and I imagine a lot of other people haven't, either. So, it may take a while for someone who has experience with it to reply to your query.

Meanwhile, any replies you get (even science discussions) will bump your thread to the "New Posts, which will increase your chances of being seen.

CD
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Old 10-15-2017, 06:00 PM   #10
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I would never deliberately eat propylene glycol
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