"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Frozen Desserts & Ice Creams
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-19-2006, 11:05 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 3
How to make soft sorbet

Help!! I want to make good home made sorbet and I have been trying many different recipes, but all of them result in hard sorbet after it has been frozen for 24 hrs. I have tried changing the sugar content and adding corn syrup, but still the sorbet is hard, not smooth and silky like you get from bought sorbet. Is it my freezer, or my ice cream maker, or recipe, or just me???? Help it is driving me crazy
thanks

__________________

__________________
sbwannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2006, 03:29 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
you're probably letting it freeze for too long, sbw.
__________________

__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2006, 11:24 PM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 3
I was hoping to be able to store it for a few days. Isnt this possible??
__________________
sbwannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2006, 11:29 PM   #4
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,363
Home freezers make it difficult to keep food properly frozen while keeping ice cream and sorbets at a servable consistency.

Don't compromise a good recipe to get a softer consistency. Take the container out of the freezer for a few minutes before serving to give it a chance to soften.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2006, 09:56 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 3
So how do commercial sorbets stay smooth and soft even when they are in a home freezer?
Actually what I would really like to do is sell sorbets at small markets we have in the area, but is it possible to only use a home freezer or do you need a commercial one. I'm a stay at home mum lucky enough to be living in the tropics at the moment and would really like to start a small home based business. I have been making sorbets for my family and have come up with some great recipes and would love to sell them, but Im having trouble getting them to the next level, ie a product that is good enough to sell. I have the flavour, but not the texture.
If anyone has any suggestions I would really appreciate it.
Thanks
__________________
sbwannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2006, 04:42 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Piccolina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,319
Send a message via AIM to Piccolina Send a message via MSN to Piccolina Send a message via Yahoo to Piccolina
I use egg whites in some of my recipes, I'm not sure if that alone makes them soft, but they do retain a nice silky texture. I usually just take out what I need about 15 minutes before serving and let it defrost a tad. Quite often it is chemicals and preservatives (stablizers) that give store bought sorbet that "semi-soft" feeling you are aiming for (BTW, congrats on wanting to start up your own enterprise, I wish you tons of luck!)
__________________
Jessica

"The most indispensable ingredient of all good home cooking: love, for those you are cooking for" ~ Sophia Loren
Piccolina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2006, 02:17 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
In fact, it is a food-grade (at least that's what we are told) anti-freeze that keeps comercially produced frozen products from becomeing too hard. I believe it's propylene glychol, but could be mistaken. A quick Google Search should tell you what you want to know. Whatever the name of the anti-freeze, it is sold in many automotive and department stores as a non-toxic "green" replacement for conventional anti-freeze for your car.

It seems that the sweet aroma and flavor of the toxic stuff is enjoyed by dogs, and if spilled can poison our love pets. And then there's the green version that is supposed to be harmless to animals and humans. But I don't see anyone drinking the stuff.

Home produced sorbet, ice creams, gellatoe, sherberts, etc. are usually eaten fresh from the ice-cream maker, and if storage is required, are allowed to warm to a soft stage bevore serving.

I got an ice-cream maker several Christmases back and had the same problems. I expected the ice cream to remain soft in the freezer. I tried custard based ice-creams, heavy cream, milk, and a host of recipes, none of which gave me soft ice cream or frozen deserts. Then I found out through research that it is nearly impossible to make home-made ice cream that stores well, that is, remains soft in the freezer.

I hate to post this as I know it's not the answer you want to read, but it is what it is.

I just looked at the ingredient list on a carton of ice cream in my freezer. For stabilisors it contains cellulose gell, cellulose gum, mono and diglycerides, and lactitol. Don't know about you, but I haven't seen these things on my local supermarket shelves.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2006, 01:08 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA,NewJersey
Posts: 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
In fact, it is a food-grade (at least that's what we are told) anti-freeze that keeps comercially produced frozen products from becomeing too hard. I believe it's propylene glychol, but could be mistaken. A quick Google Search should tell you what you want to know. Whatever the name of the anti-freeze, it is sold in many automotive and department stores as a non-toxic "green" replacement for conventional anti-freeze for your car.

It seems that the sweet aroma and flavor of the toxic stuff is enjoyed by dogs, and if spilled can poison our love pets. And then there's the green version that is supposed to be harmless to animals and humans. But I don't see anyone drinking the stuff.

Home produced sorbet, ice creams, gellatoe, sherberts, etc. are usually eaten fresh from the ice-cream maker, and if storage is required, are allowed to warm to a soft stage bevore serving.

I got an ice-cream maker several Christmases back and had the same problems. I expected the ice cream to remain soft in the freezer. I tried custard based ice-creams, heavy cream, milk, and a host of recipes, none of which gave me soft ice cream or frozen deserts. Then I found out through research that it is nearly impossible to make home-made ice cream that stores well, that is, remains soft in the freezer.

I hate to post this as I know it's not the answer you want to read, but it is what it is.

I just looked at the ingredient list on a carton of ice cream in my freezer. For stabilisors it contains cellulose gell, cellulose gum, mono and diglycerides, and lactitol. Don't know about you, but I haven't seen these things on my local supermarket shelves.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Propylene glycol is used in anti-freeze and is also considered safe for use in food applications. It doesn't make it's way into that many foods, though. Much more prevalent (especially in ice cream) is it's close molecular cousin, glycerine. Glycerine, besides being a humectant and powerful freezing point depressor, is completely harmless.

Most of the commercial additives for ice cream have evolved from traditional ingredients and can easily be substituted by the home cook. The commercial outfits utilize these frankeningredients primarily for cost savings. Substitutions for the home cook work just as well, if not better.

Cellulose gel/cellulose gum - Stabilising/Viscosity. Not available to the public but can be subbed with xanthan or guar gum. Gelatin has traditionally played this role but the soluble fiber gums (cellulose, xanthan, guar) do the job more effectively.
Mono and diglycerides - emulsifiers. Egg yolk will accomplish the same thing. If the taste of eggs is undesireable, get some lecithin from the health food store.
Lactitol - a sugar alcohol with superior freezing point depression abilities. Sugar alcohols can be purchased at most health food stores.

I don't know what kind of 'research' you've done on ice cream chemistry, but creating an ice cream at home that stores well/remains scoopable, is not that difficult. There's three areas involved:

1. Air incorporation/viscosity - the more air you can whip into the mix (overrun) the weaker the frozen ice matrix becomes/the easier to scoop. Viscosity gives you the framework to hold air bubbles.
2. Freezing point depression. Ice cream relies on the fact that a substantial portion of it's water never freezes due to the presence of freezing point depressors such as sugar.
3. Emulsification. Ice cream contains fat globules suspended in pockets of water. The larger the fat globules, the larger the pockets of water/the greater tendency for larger ice crystals to form. Larger crystals = grainy mouthfeel as well as less scoopability. Emulsifiers break down the fat into smaller globules, which in turn, creates smaller pockets of water.

As sorbet is traditionally fat free, emulsification becomes less of an issue and overrun/freezing point depression become critical. Scoopable sorbet that stores well is definitely feasible, though. I know this for certain. I've helped tens of home cooks achieve scoopable ice cream. With the right ingredients/process it's easy to end up with ice cream that's too soft. That's what happens with most of my clients. They have to back off of the freezing point depressors/air to give the ice cream a little more 'tooth.'
__________________
scott123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2006, 01:48 AM   #9
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Here's two quick fix methods to get a softer homemade sorbet:
  • Sugar - As noted in a previous post regarding ice cream, sugar will depress the water crystals from freezing so adding more sugar will help the sorbet achieve a softer consistency
  • Alcohol - Alcohol will also help depress the freezing. Try adding a complimentary flavored alcohol to the sorbet (Citron, Chambord, Midori, Cointreau, etc.)
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2006, 11:39 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Scott123, I am humbled and thankful for the info you presented in your post. It is interesting and timely. It will get me started making my own ice-cream again. Unfortunately, I won't be able to use sugar as an ingredient as I am diabetic. But with the help of some sugar alcohols, glycerine, and other various gums (I have guar and xantham gums in the cupboard), I just might be succefull yet.

Do you have any advise on how much of these ingredients to use per unit liquid? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks again.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.