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Old 08-16-2008, 09:37 PM   #1
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ISO help/tips with homemade ice cream

I just got my first ice cream maker and made ice cream. I made Alton Browns avacodo. It came out nicely and was very good as soft serve out of the mixer. Then I put it into a container and stuck it in the freezer.

It is now a big green rock. :(:(:(



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Old 08-16-2008, 09:39 PM   #2
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Hi and welcome to DC.

Your freezer is probably too cold. Try storing it in the freezer door and taking it out of the freezer 20 minutes before serving.

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Old 08-16-2008, 09:47 PM   #3
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I keep it at zero, and my regular store bought stuff is fine. Do I need to be aware of some differences between the store bought and homemade as far as texture?
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Old 08-16-2008, 10:10 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by bbaragona View Post
I keep it at zero, and my regular store bought stuff is fine. Do I need to be aware of some differences between the store bought and homemade as far as texture?
Go back and re-read the last part of the recipe:

"For soft ice cream, serve immediately. If desired, place in freezer for 3 to 4 hours for firmer texture."

Like Andy M. suggested - if it is too firm - take it out and allow to sit at room temp for about 10-20 minutes to soften up.

Commercially make ice cream often contains air incorporated into it ... think the term is "over-run" - this will make it softer. Also, differences in ingredients can make a difference in the texture of the final product.
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Old 08-18-2008, 10:43 AM   #5
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Yup, like emulsifiers that help the weak custard better retain air bubbles, to make it softer when frozen.
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Old 08-18-2008, 11:50 AM   #6
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I've also found that the more milk used changes the texture after freezing. I subbed more milk for the heavy cream once to try and "lighten" the fat content and it was good immediatley. However, after putting it in the freezer part of my fridge overnight, it was very hard the next day. Usually, when I use heavy cream it stays softer but not as soft as store made.
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Old 08-18-2008, 09:38 PM   #7
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If you want to make it softer without getting to complicated, the really simple solution is to just churn it longer. Of course this depends on your recipe. My recipe is not *technically" ice cream, since it's a custard base. However, i can guarantee that a frozen custard will be infinitely more rich and delectable than any true ice cream; and the added fat helps it to hold air better as well.

If you need a good place to start, a recipe for creme anglaise is a good bet.

Or if you want, I have a recipe, scaled for a restaurant kitchen though. It's up to you if you want to do the math :)

30 egg yolks
2 qt. heavy cream
2 qt. milk (not skim)
3 cups sugar
6 T vanilla extract (ours was pretty strong- made by blending 1 liter of vodka with 6 vanilla beans)
pinch of salt

1 digital thermometer
1 big pot
1 big bowl
1 chinois
1 long wood spoon
large ice bath
large vessel that will fit in your large ice bath

Get your cream/milk into the big pot and turn the heat to high. You want to scald this dairy- just make sure you don't let it boil over! In fact, if you're not fast a cracking/separating eggs I would do that before putting your dairy on the burner. Anyways, into your big bowl, you put your 30 yolks, your pinch of salt, and your vanilla- don't stir this at all, just dump it all in the bowl. Also, have your 3 cups of sugar at the ready.

When your dairy is about to scald, add the sugar to your eggs, salt, and vanilla, and mix to combine. Remove your scalded dairy from the heat , and very carefully temper your egg mixture, eventually returning all milk/eggs to the big pot. Turn the heat back on high, and stir furiously with your wood spoon. It is important to stir fast so you don't scramble your eggs. When the temp. reaches 184.5 immediately remove the pot from the heat, and strain the mixture through a chinois into your storage vessel (which is ideally already in your ice bath). At this point, if you have a lot of eggs in your chinois and your liquid is very thin, you cooked it too long! Your custard should have a very good nappe' consistency. Chill this in the fridge for a long time, until completely chilled; I'd say 4-6 hours at least

Congrats, you've now made creme anglaise.

You can use it as is for vanilla, or add flavorings as you see fit. If you can find them, I've had exceptional luck with various fruit compounds, particularly raspberry and cherry.

By the way- I have NO idea what you're going to do with all of those egg whites!

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