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Old 08-21-2017, 10:12 PM   #1
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Vanilla Ice Cream, I Finally Got It Right!

I've been making my own ice ream for years. I have a Cuisinart ice cream freezer that works well and I've cranked out many quarts of the stuff. Vanilla is my favorite flavor and I've made a lot of it.

I've used many different recipes because the texture always seems to have some iciness to it that I couldn't eliminate. I've made it with and without eggs. I've made it with different ratios of cream and milk. I've made it with different amounts of sugar. And I've tried various combinations of all of the above. Couldn't beat the iciness.

I learned that the sugar directly impacts the iciness. I noticed that when I make maple walnut ice cream (a long-time fave) iciness was not a problem. The texture and flavor are out of this world. No sugar added, just the syrup.

So I decided to experiment using corn syrup as a substitute for some of the sugar. Research provided some direction on substituting and a caution to only replace half the sugar with corn syrup.

I activated the calculator app on my phone and did some calculations, came up with the right ratios of sweeteners and gave it a try.

Texture and flavor were excellent. I have a winner.


VANILLA ICE CREAM

2 C Heavy Cream
2 C Whole Milk
6 Large Egg Yolks
7 Tb Corn Syrup
¾ C Sugar
1½ Tb Pure Vanilla Extract

Place the cream and milk into a 3-quart saucepan, over medium heat. Bring the mixture just to a simmer, stirring occasionally, and remove from the heat.

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the sugar and whisk to combine.

Gradually add the cream/milk mixture to the egg/sugar mixture in small amounts while whisking constantly.

Return this mixture to the pan. Continue to cook over low heat, stirring frequently, until the mixture reaches 170º F. Maintain this temperature for 5 minutes.

Pour the mixture through a strainer into a container and allow it to sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Stir in the vanilla extract.

Place the mixture in the refrigerator and once it is cool enough not to form condensation on the lid, cover and store until the mixture is fully cooled.

Pour the chilled mixture into an ice cream maker and process according to the manufacturer's directions. This should take approximately 25 minutes.

Transfer the ice cream to a suitable container for freezing and place a sheet of plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the ice cream and add the cover. Place the container into the freezer for several hours until it is fully hardened.
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Old 08-22-2017, 08:58 AM   #2
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printed! will try soon - Thanks Andy
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:07 AM   #3
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sounds good!
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Old 08-22-2017, 12:41 PM   #4
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What is the purpose of straining the mixture? Doesn't seem like there is anything in it that needs to be strained out. Just curious as I've never seen that step in ice cream recipes before.
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Old 08-22-2017, 02:23 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by jabbur View Post
What is the purpose of straining the mixture? Doesn't seem like there is anything in it that needs to be strained out. Just curious as I've never seen that step in ice cream recipes before.
When you combine eggs with a hot liquid, if you're not careful the eggs can cook a little and solidify. Straining keeps solids out of the ice cream.
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:23 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
When you combine eggs with a hot liquid, if you're not careful the eggs can cook a little and solidify. Straining keeps solids out of the ice cream.
Aka lightly scrambled eggs
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:07 PM   #7
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Aka lightly scrambled eggs
Egg-zaktly!

When you first add the hot dairy to the egg/sugar mixture, you should start off slowly so the hot liquid doesn't cook the egg. As the temperature of the combination rises, the risk of cooing the egg decreases so you can speed up the combination.

Later, when you're bringing the mixture to 170ºF, if you should creep too far over that temperature you are again at risk of cooking the egg to solid form.

Straining is the safety net in case you aren't right on with your efforts.
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:27 PM   #8
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Precisely. I strain cooked custard too for the same reason, and my! I admit I have had positive results too. Good on you for creating a better ice cream recipe Andy.
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cream, ice cream, recipe, vanilla

Vanilla Ice Cream, I Finally Got It Right! I've been making my own ice ream for years. I have a Cuisinart ice cream freezer that works well and I've cranked out many quarts of the stuff. Vanilla is my favorite flavor and I've made a lot of it. I've used many different recipes because the texture always seems to have some iciness to it that I couldn't eliminate. I've made it with and without eggs. I've made it with different ratios of cream and milk. I've made it with different amounts of sugar. And I've tried various combinations of all of the above. Couldn't beat the iciness. I learned that the sugar directly impacts the iciness. I noticed that when I make maple walnut ice cream (a long-time fave) iciness was not a problem. The texture and flavor are out of this world. No sugar added, just the syrup. So I decided to experiment using corn syrup as a substitute for some of the sugar. Research provided some direction on substituting and a caution to only replace half the sugar with corn syrup. I activated the calculator app on my phone and did some calculations, came up with the right ratios of sweeteners and gave it a try. Texture and flavor were excellent. I have a winner. VANILLA ICE CREAM 2 C Heavy Cream 2 C Whole Milk 6 Large Egg Yolks 7 Tb Corn Syrup ¾ C Sugar 1½ Tb Pure Vanilla Extract Place the cream and milk into a 3-quart saucepan, over medium heat. Bring the mixture just to a simmer, stirring occasionally, and remove from the heat. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the sugar and whisk to combine. Gradually add the cream/milk mixture to the egg/sugar mixture in small amounts while whisking constantly. Return this mixture to the pan. Continue to cook over low heat, stirring frequently, until the mixture reaches 170º F. Maintain this temperature for 5 minutes. Pour the mixture through a strainer into a container and allow it to sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Stir in the vanilla extract. Place the mixture in the refrigerator and once it is cool enough not to form condensation on the lid, cover and store until the mixture is fully cooled. Pour the chilled mixture into an ice cream maker and process according to the manufacturer's directions. This should take approximately 25 minutes. Transfer the ice cream to a suitable container for freezing and place a sheet of plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the ice cream and add the cover. Place the container into the freezer for several hours until it is fully hardened. 3 stars 1 reviews
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