"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-09-2005, 02:27 PM   #11
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by [BMF] Chris
dont cut into the meat, you loose moisture
It is my understanding that you would lose moisture if you cut into meat that was cooked, not if you cut into meat before it was cooked. Many recipes actually call for cutting into meat before it is cooked and they all retain their moisture. Two that come to mind are garlic studded meats where you cut little slits in the meat and put cloves of garlic in the slits. Another would be stuffed pork chops. You cut a pocket in the chop and stuff it.

I agree that if you cut into meat without letting it rest after it is cooked then you will lose a lot of juice, but I have no problem cutting into meat before cooking it.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2005, 03:35 PM   #12
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
It is my understanding that you would lose moisture if you cut into meat that was cooked, not if you cut into meat before it was cooked. Many recipes actually call for cutting into meat before it is cooked and they all retain their moisture. Two that come to mind are garlic studded meats where you cut little slits in the meat and put cloves of garlic in the slits. Another would be stuffed pork chops. You cut a pocket in the chop and stuff it.

I agree that if you cut into meat without letting it rest after it is cooked then you will lose a lot of juice, but I have no problem cutting into meat before cooking it.
I have to agree, GB. It's the heat of the roasting process that causes the muscle fibers to contract and squeeze out their internal juices. Allowing the meat to rest before carving allows those fibers to relax and re-absorb the juices.

Clearly, the heat induced contractions are not an issue when the meat is raw and at room temperature or below. Cutting the muscle fibers then will only cause a minimal moisture loss at the point of the cut.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2005, 05:11 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,253
Medium rare is actually more like 140-145 (internal).

125 is very rare.

IC is right, IMO. Carry-over will usually be 5, maybe even 10 degrees, so taking the meat out at at internal temp of less than 110 will mean you are basically eating raw meat.

Also GB and Andy are correct, slicing/cutting/poking raw meat does not cause it to lose moisture. After all, unless you are eating a whole pig or something your meat has already been cut and it didn't have all the juice drain out.

BTW same goes for salting. You should always salt meat before cooking it. Salting just prior to cooking does not draw out any significant moisture.
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2005, 09:43 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
Medium rare is actually more like 140-145 (internal).

125 is very rare.

IC is right, IMO. Carry-over will usually be 5, maybe even 10 degrees, so taking the meat out at at internal temp of less than 110 will mean you are basically eating raw meat.

Also GB and Andy are correct, slicing/cutting/poking raw meat does not cause it to lose moisture. After all, unless you are eating a whole pig or something your meat has already been cut and it didn't have all the juice drain out.

BTW same goes for salting. You should always salt meat before cooking it. Salting just prior to cooking does not draw out any significant moisture.
That's a good point that I forgot to mention.

115-125 degrees is on the side of the rare spectrum that's closer to still moving. I should've said 115 is the cut-off for the rarest that you'd want to cook beef. Usually people who want their meat at that doneness will request "super rare".
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2005, 09:50 PM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pdswife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Washington
Posts: 20,308
Send a message via AIM to pdswife Send a message via MSN to pdswife Send a message via Yahoo to pdswife
Talking

I love this site. I learn something new from you guys everyday. Thank you for making my life better.
__________________

__________________
In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on. Robert Frost
pdswife is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.