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Old 01-16-2014, 11:58 AM   #61
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Thanks for the link GG. It was a fun read. I'm going to try that.
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Old 01-16-2014, 12:21 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
My mom always said that and I always believed her

I would only add that you need to actually follow the directions, until you're comfortable enough that you can start winging it. I had a friend who would consistently overcook meat because it didn't "look" done and she couldn't understand why.

Ever since I read this article, I've been salting my steak at least 45 minutes before cooking; I only season with salt and pepper and cook to medium-rare. It comes out perfectly seasoned, juicy and delicious: Steak Recipe: Turning Cheap "Choice" Steak into Gucci "Prime" Steak | Steamy Kitchen Recipes
Thanks for the link GG. I'm always up to try something new.
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Old 01-16-2014, 01:09 PM   #63
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If you can read, you can cook. My SIL is living proof of that.
Not sure I can agree with this statement. Of course the novice could assemble something edible, but they would still not know technique and may not understand the terminology.

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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Ever since I read this article, I've been salting my steak at least 45 minutes before cooking; I only season with salt and pepper and cook to medium-rare. It comes out perfectly seasoned, juicy and delicious: Steak Recipe: Turning Cheap "Choice" Steak into Gucci "Prime" Steak | Steamy Kitchen Recipes
This was what I was looking for.
I was taught to never salt steaks before you cooked them. I was told it would remove moisture and that removing moisture was a bad thing. That it would dry out the meat.

Since the link refers to turning choice steaks in to prime steaks, would the use of prime make this method moot?
What I mean is? If you already have well marbled, high quality, tender steaks, would one still use this method?

I appreciate the link and have it bookmarked. I was not able to read all of the article, but I did read the reasoning/thinking. I stopped at the scientific explanations and drawings.
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Old 01-16-2014, 01:20 PM   #64
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Not sure I can agree with this statement. Of course the novice could assemble something edible, but they would still not know technique and may not understand the terminology.
I'm proof of it, too. It may not be perfect the first time, but you can certainly learn by reading. Well, *I* can

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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
This was what I was looking for.
I was taught to never salt steaks before you cooked them. I was told it would remove moisture and that removing moisture was a bad thing. That it would dry out the meat.

Since the link refers to turning choice steaks in to prime steaks, would the use of prime make this method moot?
What I mean is? If you already have well marbled, high quality, tender steaks, would one still use this method?

I appreciate the link and have it bookmarked. But I did read the reasoning. I stopped at the scientific explanations and drawings.
If you read the article, you would know that she was not using the terms choice and prime literally.

Times change, techniques change, we learn new facts, sometimes people change with them. My dad was shocked when I told him he should salt the steak well before cooking it; he was taught the same thing growing up. Searing doesn't seal in juices, either, but I can't help what people were told 40 years ago.

I would call this a quick method of dry aging. Dry aging removes moisture from meat, leaving more concentrated beefy flavor. If you choose not to use that terminology, just do me a favor and don't tell me, okay?
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Old 01-16-2014, 03:49 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
My mom always said that and I always believed her

I would only add that you need to actually follow the directions, until you're comfortable enough that you can start winging it. I had a friend who would consistently overcook meat because it didn't "look" done and she couldn't understand why.

Ever since I read this article, I've been salting my steak at least 45 minutes before cooking; I only season with salt and pepper and cook to medium-rare. It comes out perfectly seasoned, juicy and delicious: Steak Recipe: Turning Cheap "Choice" Steak into Gucci "Prime" Steak | Steamy Kitchen Recipes
That's one terrific article GG. I hope everyone does themselves the favor of reading the whole thing...

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Old 01-16-2014, 04:03 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post

My mom always said that and I always believed her

I would only add that you need to actually follow the directions, until you're comfortable enough that you can start winging it. I had a friend who would consistently overcook meat because it didn't "look" done and she couldn't understand why.

Ever since I read this article, I've been salting my steak at least 45 minutes before cooking; I only season with salt and pepper and cook to medium-rare. It comes out perfectly seasoned, juicy and delicious: http://www.steamykitchen.com/163-how...me-steaks.html
I wonder if the authors method would work on pork chops? Perhaps they're too lean?
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:15 PM   #67
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Excellent article GG!! Thanks for sharing it.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:30 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I'm proof of it, too. It may not be perfect the first time, but you can certainly learn by reading. Well, *I* can
If you read the article, you would know that she was not using the terms choice and prime literally.
Times change, techniques change, we learn new facts, sometimes people change with them. My dad was shocked when I told him he should salt the steak well before cooking it; he was taught the same thing growing up. Searing doesn't seal in juices, either, but I can't help what people were told 40 years ago.
I would call this a quick method of dry aging. Dry aging removes moisture from meat, leaving more concentrated beefy flavor. If you choose not to use that terminology, just do me a favor and don't tell me, okay?
Yep. I agree and will try this method the very next time I have steaks for dinner. Maybe tomorrow.

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That's one terrific article GG. I hope everyone does themselves the favor of reading the whole thing...
I was finally able to read it all and plan to use the method very soon.
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Old 01-16-2014, 07:23 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by Rocket_J_Dawg View Post

I wonder if the authors method would work on pork chops? Perhaps they're too lean?
I've used it on pork chops, too, and DH commented on how juicy and tasty they were
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Old 01-16-2014, 07:28 PM   #70
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GG, appreciate the article, it fascinates me! I have a little rump roast that's just begging for this kind of cooking!
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