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Old 01-16-2014, 08:20 PM   #71
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I've used it on pork chops, too, and DH commented on how juicy and tasty they were
Actually I always brine my pork chops and this seems to be a waterless brine. I wonder if there's any noticeable difference in the end product.
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Old 01-16-2014, 10:05 PM   #72
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Actually I always brine my pork chops and this seems to be a waterless brine. I wonder if there's any noticeable difference in the end product.
Salt is hygroscopic and is used to draw moisture out of foods. That is why Kosher salt is used to make meats Kosher. The salt draws blood (fluids) from the meat.

That being said, if a little salt is used, or a brine is used, the salt will be dissolved in water. There will be a greater concentration of salt water outside the meat than inside. Osmotic pressure will cause the salt water to be drawn into the meat until the concentration inside and out is equal.

Again though, if too much salt is used, as in a dry rub, it will draw water out of the meat, making it less juicy.

So the answer to your question is, dry salt applied to the meat will, over time, be drawn into the meat, if used sparingly. Brine solutions will actually hydrate the meat as the inside concentrations of brine and tissue fluids equalize.

Salt added for twenty minutes or more, before cooking, will season the meat more thoroughly that salting during cooking. Brining will do the same. Only brining can add moisture to the meat. Dry salting can not.

The single most important determining factor, other than the meat quality, in presenting a juicy, flavorful steak, is cooking it to the right internal temperature. Typically, rare meat is maintains more fluid, and is more tender. As you cook it longer, it loses more moisture, and toughens.

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Old 01-16-2014, 11:56 PM   #73
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....Ever since I read this article, I've been salting my steak at least 45 minutes before cooking; I only season with salt and pepper and cook to medium-rare. It comes out perfectly seasoned, juicy and delicious: Steak Recipe: Turning Cheap "Choice" Steak into Gucci "Prime" Steak | Steamy Kitchen Recipes
Good read. Thanks GG!
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Old 01-17-2014, 12:48 PM   #74
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Actually I always brine my pork chops and this seems to be a waterless brine. I wonder if there's any noticeable difference in the end product.

Have you ever dry brined your pork or poultry?

It totally makes you rethink ever wet brining again

Made famous by delicious Zuni Café chicken: zuni cafe’s roasted chicken + bread salad | smitten kitchen

It's a fabulous technique.

https://www.google.com/search?source...&q=dry+brining
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Old 01-17-2014, 02:35 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Have you ever dry brined your pork or poultry?

It totally makes you rethink ever wet brining again

Made famous by delicious Zuni Café chicken: zuni cafe’s roasted chicken + bread salad | smitten kitchen

It's a fabulous technique.

https://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-

8&rlz=1T4GGNI_enUS561US561&q=dry+brining
Jenny I remember you posting that zuni cafe roasted chicken before and I've since adapted the technique to a vertical roasted chicken, with spectacular results.
It's another great read folks!
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Old 01-18-2014, 12:55 PM   #76
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Its funny how stuff we did years (and even today) ago, is all of a sudden the right way to do it.

When I was growing up, my father would always season meat with all the spices he planned to use at least the day before he cooked it.
In fact, I have ribs in the fridge as we speak that were seasoned last night and liberally coated with a creole seasoning mix I make.
We have been doing this since I have been alive.
But we never called it brining. We just did it because we did it. To allow the seasoning to permeate the meat and give a stronger flavor to the meat.

Then here come TV chefs warning about salting a steak and how it would dry it out.

Seems i was better off before they came along.
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Old 01-18-2014, 01:31 PM   #77
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Then here come TV chefs warning about salting a steak and how it would dry it out.

Seems i was better off before they came along.
TV chefs have something to sell. Their fame. It makes big bucks for them. And they have to fill air time. So they often say things that make no sense or are opposite to what we have been doing for years as home cooks. Things our parents did and passed on down to us. Kitchen tricks that work. My mother didn't cook for the masses. She cooked for a family just as we do today. She used common sense when she cooked. And so do we. We do what we know works for us.
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Old 01-19-2014, 12:28 PM   #78
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TV chefs have something to sell. Their fame. It makes big bucks for them. And they have to fill air time. So they often say things that make no sense or are opposite to what we have been doing for years as home cooks. Things our parents did and passed on down to us. Kitchen tricks that work. My mother didn't cook for the masses. She cooked for a family just as we do today. She used common sense when she cooked. And so do we. We do what we know works for us.
Amen Addie. Well said.
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Old 01-20-2014, 08:20 AM   #79
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I've heard TV chefs say things that are just wrong. Addie said it perfectly.

The only shows I watch on Food Network involve actual competative cooking, as sometimes the chefs, or participants can get pretty creative. I watch what they do to get inspiration for new ideas. I don't watch shows where they're trying to teach me something. Instead, I come here to DC for information, or experiment on my own. I feel I can get accurate advice here, and can learn by doing.

I tried the salt and sit technique two nights ago for steak. I didn't care for it. The meat was juicy, and tender. But for me, the salt was too present. I like the flavor of the beef, with just a hint of saltiness to enhance the natural flavor of the meat. And I wait until I see steaks with the qualities I'm looking for in the meat counter before I'll buy one. I don't eat it often enough to warrant purchasing lesser quality meat when I want steak. The lesser meat is reserved for other preparations.

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Old 01-20-2014, 12:47 PM   #80
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Chief. Did you rinse off the remaining salt before cooking?
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