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Old 12-08-2014, 09:37 AM   #11
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Don't forget the Spaetzle! To me, that's the best thing about Hungarian Goulash, or for Kayelle's Chicken Paprikash
Not to split fine hairs, but the Hungarian equivalent of the "dumpling/noodle" that is added to Gulyás is Csipetke if s/one is looking for an authentic recipe. These are not shaved into the soup/stew, but rather the blobs of dough are about the size of a pea and rolled off your fingers into the pot. Spaetzle in Hungary are called galuska or nokeldli, but authentic Gulyás will have Csipetke (or not) and be served with a cucumber salad. At least, that is how I've always had it, maybe times have changed.
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Old 12-08-2014, 11:08 AM   #12
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Not to split fine hairs, but the Hungarian equivalent of the "dumpling/noodle" that is added to Gulyás is Csipetke if s/one is looking for an authentic recipe. These are not shaved into the soup/stew, but rather the blobs of dough are about the size of a pea and rolled off your fingers into the pot. Spaetzle in Hungary are called galuska or nokeldli, but authentic Gulyás will have Csipetke (or not) and be served with a cucumber salad. At least, that is how I've always had it, maybe times have changed.
Or maybe different regions of the country do it in slightly different ways, like in Italy or Germany.
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Old 12-08-2014, 11:23 AM   #13
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Or maybe different regions of the country do it in slightly different ways, like in Italy or Germany.
That would not be in Hungary.
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Old 12-08-2014, 12:02 PM   #14
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That would not be in Hungary.
Why not? It seems to me that a lot of traditions can be created during a thousand years of history which includes division into three areas. And the Habsburgs were German, where spaetzle is common.

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In 1000, King Stephen I (St. Stephen) founded the state of Hungary, and accepted the Catholic religion as standard. Stephen was crowned with the Holy Crown of Hungary and blessed by the Pope. The crown is now displayed in the Parliament building.

In 1241-1242 the invasion of the Mongols caused serious destruction in the country, and half of the population were killed or deported as slaves (1 million people). After the invasion King Béla ordered the construction of a system of strong stone castles to defend the country from further attacks. The second Mongolian strike was stopped at Pest by the royal army thanks to these castles.

After a Turkish conquering army defeated the Hungarian royal army at Mohács in 1526, the country split into three parts around 1541; the Hungarian Kingdom, the Habsburg dominion and the Turkish dominion. It took 150 years before the Hungarians could stand up to this situation, reunite and drive out the Turks. After the Turkish domination, the country became part of the Habsburg dominion, but under the leadership of Ferenc Rákóczi II. Hungarians partly took back their independence, and signed the treaty of peace at Szatmár in 1711.
http://gotohungary.com/history
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Old 12-08-2014, 02:43 PM   #15
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I understand that most of the recipes I see say to serve it over noodles or add the Spaetzle, but I want to make it with the chunks of potato in it like my mother did. I just wondered if anyone could tell me when I should add the potatoes so they get done, but not mushy. If not, I will just wing it.
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Old 12-08-2014, 03:12 PM   #16
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Too late to edit, but I just found a recipe with potatoes, and it says cook the goulash for 1-1/2 hour, add the potatoes, and cook for 1/2 hour more.
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Old 12-08-2014, 03:21 PM   #17
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Carol assuming the potato will be bite size I think 30 minutes would be too long. I'd aim for 15 minutes.
Let me add that if you choose to use potato the leftovers won't freeze well.
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Old 12-08-2014, 06:07 PM   #18
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Why not? It seems to me that a lot of traditions can be created during a thousand years of history which includes division into three areas. And the Habsburgs were German, where spaetzle is common.



Hungary's history in a nutshell - History
I misinterpreted what you wrote--I read it to mean if Hungarian goulash were made outside of Hungary. I think every Hungarian family has their own version of goulash and how they like to eat it. I do know that which I've eaten prepared by s/one from Hungary includes a lot more paprika than one would think (one friend uses about 1/2 c!). Although, hard to say exactly how much because she pours it in with the onions until it "looks like enough." I personally don't like cooked green pepper, but have yet to eat goulash without that s/one else makes. So I guess my version would not be authentic, because I leave out the green and red peppers that one usually finds in it.
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Old 12-09-2014, 09:44 AM   #19
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Carol assuming the potato will be bite size I think 30 minutes would be too long. I'd aim for 15 minutes.
Let me add that if you choose to use potato the leftovers won't freeze well.

I usually check things during cooking time, so if the meat is pretty tender when I add the potatoes, I would check until the potatoes are fork tender. I find that many things get done before the cooking time stated in the recipe.

And, I don't expect to have leftovers. I will be lucky to get DH to try this freshly cooked, so getting him to eat it leftover is a total dream. Without the potatoes, he probably wouldn't even try it.
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Old 12-09-2014, 12:29 PM   #20
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I usually check things during cooking time, so if the meat is pretty tender when I add the potatoes, I would check until the potatoes are fork tender. I find that many things get done before the cooking time stated in the recipe.

And, I don't expect to have leftovers. I will be lucky to get DH to try this freshly cooked, so getting him to eat it leftover is a total dream. Without the potatoes, he probably wouldn't even try it.
My late husband hated leftovers. Since I married Steve (sous chef) I don't think I've ever run old leftovers into the garbage disposal. Maybe I've become a better cook, or maybe he just likes my cooking better.
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