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Old 11-13-2008, 10:55 AM   #11
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I have a roast thawing and would love to use it for this recipe.. but I want to leave it whole instead of cutting it up into cubes. If I brown the meat first ... how long do you think I should cook it in all those wonderful juices for? It's about 3 pounds.
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Old 11-13-2008, 11:02 AM   #12
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A three pound roast should be done is 3-4 hours.
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Old 11-13-2008, 11:20 AM   #13
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Thank you Andy!
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Old 11-13-2008, 12:09 PM   #14
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If I were making this recipe, I would tweak it a little by:
Increasing the garlic to 3 or 4 cloves and add it to the liquid instead of to the browning.
Increase the bay from 1/2 small to 3 or 4 average leaves.
Increase the tomato paste to a small can or slightly less.
Recipe calls for 18 small white onions. I assume we are talking pearl onions here. A reasonable substitute would be 2 or 3 quartered white or sweet onions. 18 small onions is a lot.

All these ingredients add a depth of flavor, but in the small quantities I think that they would get lost.

All are my opinions. Dissenting opinions encouraged. I'm here to learn.
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Old 12-12-2009, 09:56 AM   #15
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Here's another way

Here's another way:

Beef Bourguignon


Notes:
A traditional french stew cooked with red wine. A bit of demi-glace or brown sauce adds depth to the flavor. Adapted from Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook.

Ingredients:
  • 2lb beef shoulder or neck cut into 1 1/2"cubes
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 4 onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 tbsp all purpose flour
  • 1 cup red Burgundy
  • 6 carrots, cut into 1" pieces
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • Bouquet garni (1 sprig parsley, 2 sprigs thyme, 2 bay leaf wrapped in cheesecloth)
  • Chopped flat parsley

Equipment:
  • Dutch oven or large heavy pot
  • Wooden spoon
  • Ladle

Directions:
  1. Season the meat with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in the Dutch oven until almost smoking.
  2. Add the meat in batches and sear on all sides. Do not overcrowd the pot.
  3. Remove last batch of meat and add onions to pot. Lower heat slightly and cook for about 10 minutes, until golden brown. Sprinkle flour and stir for 4 more minutes.
  4. Add the red wine. Scrape up bits in bottom of pot.
  5. Return the meat to the pot and add carrots, garlic, bouquet garni.
  6. Add enough water (and demi glace if you have it) to cover the meat by one third.
  7. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 2 hours or until meat is very tender. Stir gently during cooking. Skim off any scum.
  8. Remove bouquet garni, add chopped parsley and serve.

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Old 12-13-2009, 08:05 AM   #16
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I tasted Beef Bourguingon for the first and only time many years ago at the Bellagio buffet in Las Vegas. I wasn't too impressed with the dish. That's why even after I seriously got into cooking these last 6-7 years, I've never felt tempted to make this stew.

But after watching Julie & Julia, I made it for the first time last week. I used Julia's recipe from her excellent book The Way to Cook. I used beef shank. I followed her recipe to the letter because I wanted the authentic taste so as to understand the big deal with Beef Bourguingon.

I'm sorry to say that I still wasn't impressed. The taste was very similar to what I had tasted in Las Vegas that first time. The meat was indeed meltingly tender and the sauce was certainly rich enough. But the flavor was very basic, very beefy, with the added depth of the red wine reduction. I guess I keep expecting a more unique, complex flavor which in my mind would warrant the attention given to this dish.
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Old 12-16-2009, 04:55 PM   #17
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Try adding a spoonful of real demi-glace... and use quality red wine. If that doesn't do it, then you're right, you just don't like bourguignon. No matter. Plenty of other goodness out there.
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Old 12-17-2009, 06:37 AM   #18
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Beef Bourguignon reminds me of Julia Child, hence the movie Julie & Julia:)haven't tried making it though but my aunts swear by Julia Child's recipe



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Old 01-16-2010, 07:06 AM   #19
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Hie everyone
I'm French and I live ... In Bourgogne !

so "Boeuf Bourguignon" is a recipe that I really know


in my home, we have a different recipe.
there is no bacon (and no ham), and there isn't a lot of carotts (I think that's a pitty because I love it, but now it's just to add some flavour)
and we eat this with potatoes that come from Auvergne. It is wonderfull
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Old 01-17-2010, 04:36 AM   #20
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Well I'll be .... Had two pounds or lamb cubes and was just making dinner on the fly but it seems what I did was pretty much this reciepe except lamb instead of beef.
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