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Old 08-10-2011, 07:07 PM   #21
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I can see adding tomato paste to a soup I make with the stock, I am not sure I would want to use it while making the stock itself. Can't imagine it wouldn't be right tasty though.
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Old 08-10-2011, 08:26 PM   #22
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Spreading a coating of tomato paste on beef bones before roasting them is a standard method for making beef stock. It's one of those flavor enhancers that you really can't taste in the finished product but makes it all taste better.
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Old 08-10-2011, 09:30 PM   #23
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Ok.. so now you have me wanting to make a large batch of beef stock... I wonder how much I still have.
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Old 08-10-2011, 09:33 PM   #24
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Although that's not how I did it, I can see how the tomato would totally round out the flavor of the stock. While making the veggie beef soup with the bones/meat, I couldn't figure out what was lacking in the taste until it hit me; I didn't have any tomato in there. At first it was intentional because I don't like tomatoes but then I realized I needed some kind of tomato so I put a can of tomato sauce in there and it totally changed it to the perfect flavor.

I'll definitely be visiting that butcher again at the farmers market to get more soup bones and next time I'll experiment with roasting them and adding other stuff. Only problem is, dh doesn't accept soup as a meal lol. But I guess I can always make up a batch and freeze portions of it to take as lunch at work.
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Old 09-06-2011, 10:46 AM   #25
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I probably should not be posting here as I am new to the cooking experience. However, my limited exposure has convinced me that making a good stock (as well as roux) is a valuable fundamental to master.

Here is what I consider a great how to article for making beef stock
Brown Beef Stock – The Culinary School Recipe | Island Vittles

It mirrors what many of you have already said...Roasting the bones with a mirepoix. Brushing with tomato paste then roasting some more. Other points I picked up on was that is is important to use COLD water as the first liquid to help extract the good stuff from the roasted bones. So far I have added a bouquet garni for seasoning the stock. I have also read to avoid stirring a stock as it will cloud it.

For me though, the simple but important issue of determining whether my stock (etc.) has achieved a state of low and slow simmer or boil is in question. Simmer is good. Boil is less so. I have tried measuring with a thermometer which works ok. But whenever I see other cooking programs that says 'Simmer', there seems to be more activity in their pot than what happens in mine. I have read that simmer is below a boil so, at sea level at least, the temp should be in the 190 to 205 range. But that range just doesn't 'look like' what others consider simmer.

How do you determine simmer / boil state, or is it too trivial to even consider?

Thanks
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Old 09-06-2011, 12:12 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuanaCook View Post
I probably should not be posting here as I am new to the cooking experience. However, my limited exposure has convinced me that making a good stock (as well as roux) is a valuable fundamental to master.

Here is what I consider a great how to article for making beef stock
Brown Beef Stock – The Culinary School Recipe | Island Vittles

It mirrors what many of you have already said...Roasting the bones with a mirepoix. Brushing with tomato paste then roasting some more. Other points I picked up on was that is is important to use COLD water as the first liquid to help extract the good stuff from the roasted bones. So far I have added a bouquet garni for seasoning the stock. I have also read to avoid stirring a stock as it will cloud it.

For me though, the simple but important issue of determining whether my stock (etc.) has achieved a state of low and slow simmer or boil is in question. Simmer is good. Boil is less so. I have tried measuring with a thermometer which works ok. But whenever I see other cooking programs that says 'Simmer', there seems to be more activity in their pot than what happens in mine. I have read that simmer is below a boil so, at sea level at least, the temp should be in the 190 to 205 range. But that range just doesn't 'look like' what others consider simmer.

How do you determine simmer / boil state, or is it too trivial to even consider?

Thanks
Simmering involves hot liquid that bubbles slightly without moving the water very much. It's the temperature where the water begins to boil. 190' F. is much lower than the boiling point of water - 212 at sea level. It is hot enough to cook most foods, but not so hot so as to disturb the food to make the broth cloudy. Eggs can be cooked at this temperature to keep the shell from cracking due to movement created by a rolling boil. The egg white and yolk will set beautifully. Eggs can be poached, or coddled at this temperature as well, and will hold together better. When making egg-drop soup, the same technique is used. A hard boil is mainly used to concentrate liquid faster, as the water vaporizes faster and is released into the air at a faster rate. This is useful when concentrating a broth. But, to get the harder boil, the temperature of the pot must be hotter, creating the possibility of scorching whatever food is touching the hot pan surface.

Simmering is useful to avoid scorching such foods as pea soup, milk, tomato sauce, etc. The lower heat still cooks the food. The lower pan temperature is less likely to burn the food.

When you place a pan of water over a heat source, it will quickly show you where the hot spots are in your pan, as the bubbles will emanate from those places first. Difusers will hellp elliminate hot spots, and help you avoid scorching foods.

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Old 09-07-2011, 11:01 AM   #27
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I don't think that boiling vs simmering makes that much difference if you are not eating the meat. However, beef, chicken, whatever (as in coq au vin, pot au feu, New England boiled dinner, or boef bourgonion) it is much more important to let it simmer rather than boil. The more gentle cooking leaves the meat more tender, less stringy.
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Old 09-07-2011, 07:56 PM   #28
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I have little experience to know which or why, but it seems to me many recipes request what chef Ann Burrell (and probably everybody else too) calls BTB RTS (Bring To Boil, Reduce To Simmer.) To accurately reproduce the recipe, I feel it is important to reliably accomplish precisely that by identifying the difference between he two.

Thanks again.
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