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Old 12-28-2003, 09:31 PM   #1
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Best cut for roast beef?

What is the best cut for a nice roast beef? I made a spiral ham for Christmas for hubby & me, and enjoyed having the leftovers. So, I thought it would be nice to cook a roast beef. I wont be using my crockpot, so what is a good one for the oven?

Any suggestions?

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Old 12-28-2003, 10:24 PM   #2
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Tender Roast Beef

I just buy a cheap cut - the longer it cooks the more tender it becomes. I don't recall the name of the cut - just that it's a cheap one! LOL

Sometimes I cook my roast in a pot on the stove (cover with water, add veggies, salt, pepper, garlic, etc.) for 3 or so hours. I sear on all sides first.

Or I'll put in an oven bag with mushrooms and cream of mushroom soup and about 1/4 cup sherry (I can't remember now if I add some water too) then bake for about 3 hours.
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Old 12-29-2003, 12:10 AM   #3
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Best beef for roasting

Standing rib or any rib roast, pierced with garlic and rubbed with kosher salt- yuum! Not very innovative but I've never tasted better
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Old 12-29-2003, 05:59 AM   #4
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it depends if you want a pot roast type, or an oven roasted type. for a post roast, I just use a big ol' chuck roast. if you want to oven roast it, then a bone-in rib roast works the best, in terms of flavor and tenderness.
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Old 12-29-2003, 07:20 AM   #5
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I agree with Iron chef...get a standing rib roast!
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Old 01-01-2004, 04:42 PM   #6
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I bought a tri-tip roast, I think? Now I cant remember, but its one of the more tender cuts. I plan on making it for dinner on Sunday. Which do you think would turn out better? Crock pot or Oven? I've only used my crock pot once.
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Old 01-01-2004, 09:31 PM   #7
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First, different cuts are called different things depending on your location. HERE a tri-tip is a cut that requires braising to achieve tenderness. Thus...break out that crockpot!
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Old 01-02-2004, 12:53 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiggerbengal
I bought a tri-tip roast, I think? Now I cant remember, but its one of the more tender cuts. I plan on making it for dinner on Sunday. Which do you think would turn out better? Crock pot or Oven? I've only used my crock pot once.
I agree with Iron Chef. My mom uses her crockpot for tri-tip - browns it first and then adds the old reliable dry onion soup mix and a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup. (Turns out great for unbuckle-your- belt comfort food). I would add a little red wine but maybe that's just my excuse for uncorking another bottle!
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Old 01-02-2004, 11:45 PM   #9
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Cross-Rib or Standing Rib

In my books the best oven roasts have bones in them. For an inexpensive delicious meal for two or three I often buy a small Cross-Rib roast, and cover it copiously with garlic salt and pepper. Delicious and inexpensive. I use a high heat method, cook it at 500 until the center temperature reaches *130, then let it stand for about 15 minutes. If I am having more people over, I'll purchase a three or more rib Standing Rib or Prime Rib, and use a modified high heat method - 500 for 45 minutes. Lower the heat to 325 for about half an hour, then turn it up to 450 until the internal temp reaches *130, usually about another 15 - 30 minutes. I use an instant read thermometer to get the temp right every time. That or a probe take the guess work out. I have found that a roast can sit quite happily on the counter wrapped in tin foil for a fair amount of time if other things need cooking, like Yorkshire Puddings.

*medium towards rare
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Old 01-03-2004, 06:22 AM   #10
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Kiteking has uncovered the secret of perfect roast beef........Yorkshire puddings! I roasted a piece of topside the other day, not my favourite cut, but on sale at the supermarket, studded with garlic, cooked on a bed of onions with a bit of red wine, and a splash of brandy. It turned out nice, and we are now eating cold beef sandwiches. I made Yorkshire puddings and they actually worked, mine usually look like pancakes!
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