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Old 02-05-2009, 12:05 PM   #1
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Best Lean Beef to Cook in a Dutch Oven?

I am pretty new to cooking so I appreciate simple recipes - does anyone have ideas ?

1. Which cuts of beef are best to cook in a dutch oven?

2. Any good recipes for said items?


Appreciate it even if you can give me a general direction, I can wing it :)

Thanks everyone!

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Old 02-05-2009, 12:15 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by machx View Post
I am pretty new to cooking so I appreciate simple recipes - does anyone have ideas ?

1. Which cuts of beef are lean and cook well in a dutch oven?

2. Any good recipes for said items?


Appreciate it even if you can give me a general direction, I can wing it :)

Thanks everyone!
Pot roast/chuck roasts are great for dutch ovens and slow cookers
Brown (meaning to seare in the juices) first on both sides in the dutch oven, add salt & pepper to meat and set aside. Add potatoes, carrots, onions, garlic to the dutch oven and add one 15oz can of chicken or beef broth. Lay roast on top of the vegetables, top with the lid and let it simmer on medium heat for 2-3 hrs and voila!
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:19 PM   #3
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Really lean beef doesn't do well in a dutch oven. It dries out and can be tough.

I agree that chuck is one of the best. Brisket, too.
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:22 PM   #4
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Really lean beef doesn't do well in a dutch oven. It dries out and can be tough.

I agree that chuck is one of the best. Brisket, too.
After I posted I was thinking that.. Actually come to think of it scratch the lean thing, it doesn't have to be that lean, just not tons of fat! I don't mind a bit of fat but not like marble... get my drift? :)
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:27 PM   #5
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Pot roast/chuck roasts are great for dutch ovens and slow cookers
Brown (meaning to seare in the juices) first on both sides in the dutch oven, add salt & pepper to meat and set aside. Add potatoes, carrots, onions, garlic to the dutch oven and add one 15oz can of chicken or beef broth. Lay roast on top of the vegetables, top with the lid and let it simmer on medium heat for 2-3 hrs and voila!
This sounds really good, thanks!

Are there any strategies to reduce the cooking time? I'm guessing beef just takes longer to cook in general (Can you tell I'm a newer cook? :) )
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:42 PM   #6
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Dutch Oven = long, slow cooking by definition.

Think pot roast and stew -- meat braised (looked low and slow) in a heavy, lidded pot with some liquid.

You need to cook the meat for a long time -- till it's falling apart. If you cook it only until it's "done" it will be very tough.

Beef Bourguignon is kind of stew that's delicious and not that hard to make.

Pot Roast is easier though. It's just a beef roast cooked in liquid, generally beef broth or wine. Some people use dry onion soup mix or canned cream soup like mushroom. Usually you toss in some onions, carrots and potatoes, too. You cook the meat till it's very well done and falling apart.

There are loads of recipes posted here for pot roast and stews.
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:54 PM   #7
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Gotcha thank you... I was able to cook up chili quickly last night, So perhaps beef roasts will be something I reserve for the weekend when I have a couple hours to wait. During the week I get home at around 6 PM and I'm hungry! :)

Thank you for all the useful info!
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:56 PM   #8
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You are right. Dutch oven cooking is something for a non-workday.

But the best thing is that you can make up a lot and enjoy easy leftovers during the week.

Pot roast gives you versatile leftovers.
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:57 PM   #9
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Gotcha thank you... I was able to cook up chili quickly last night, So perhaps beef roasts will be something I reserve for the weekend when I have a couple hours to wait. During the week I get home at around 6 PM and I'm hungry! :)

Thank you for all the useful info!
I make dishes like this on the weekends, put it in the fridge then heat it up when I get home. Sometimes letting it sit for a few days adds lots more flavor as well
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:57 PM   #10
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This sounds really good, thanks!

Are there any strategies to reduce the cooking time? I'm guessing beef just takes longer to cook in general (Can you tell I'm a newer cook? :) )
It's not beef in general that takes longer to cook - it's the tough cuts that are suitable for braising in a Dutch oven. They have a lot of fat and connective tissue, and cooking them for a long time at a low temperature allows the fat to render out and the tough connective tissue to essentially melt and make the meat more tender. The same is true of pork and lamb shoulder or butt roasts.

If you want a faster cooking beef roast, you want a sirloin or other tender roast that bakes in a shorter period of time and is done when the meat is medium-rare in the center.
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