"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-25-2007, 09:48 PM   #1
Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 88
Braising eye round steak

Hey everyone. so i went a little nuts today at the butchers but i hadnt eaten all day and everything looked so good. i bought this nice 3lb chunk of eye round steak and usually i cut it into slices and pan fry for sandwiches but id love to try to braise for the first time. how would one do so? thanks!

__________________

__________________
oppose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2007, 10:17 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,384
Season with salt and pepper and brown it in hot oil on all sides. Place it in a dutch oven with diced onion, carrots and celery. Beef broth and red wine, tomato and some thyme, garlic and a couple of spoons of tomato paste. Bring it to a boil and simmer, covered for 2-3 hours until the meat is fork tender. You can also put the covered pot into a 300F oven and let it cook in there. When the meat is done, remove it and reduce the sauce and thicken oit with a flour and water slurry. Adjust the seasoning and serve.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2007, 10:27 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Des Moines Iowa
Posts: 1,214
Andy M you are so right on
__________________
Cook with passion or don't cook at all
Dave Hutchins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2007, 09:13 AM   #4
Head Chef
 
Jeff G.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1,352
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Season with salt and pepper and brown it in hot oil on all sides. Place it in a dutch oven with diced onion, carrots and celery. Beef broth and red wine, tomato and some thyme, garlic and a couple of spoons of tomato paste. Bring it to a boil and simmer, covered for 2-3 hours until the meat is fork tender. You can also put the covered pot into a 300F oven and let it cook in there. When the meat is done, remove it and reduce the sauce and thicken oit with a flour and water slurry. Adjust the seasoning and serve.

Yep--but I would toss in some red potatoes cut in half...I like potatoes....
__________________
Jeff G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2007, 11:32 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 3,619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Season with salt and pepper and brown it in hot oil on all sides. Place it in a dutch oven with diced onion, carrots and celery. Beef broth and red wine, tomato and some thyme, garlic and a couple of spoons of tomato paste. Bring it to a boil and simmer, covered for 2-3 hours until the meat is fork tender. You can also put the covered pot into a 300F oven and let it cook in there. When the meat is done, remove it and reduce the sauce and thicken oit with a flour and water slurry. Adjust the seasoning and serve.
Sounds wonderful, Andy. I do it in a similar fashion but I have a question about the beef broth - broth in general. Do you make your own or do you buy it? The same with chicken. I'm embarrassed to admit I've never added broth to anything. I put some canned chicken broth in something once that said "for a richer result, sub some of the liquid with broth". Well, it came out too salty. Now, ya'll know I'm a poor cook so it could have been any number of things that made it too salty. (Cook's error is probably #1 on the list.) But I've been noticing ya'll mention broth a lot so there must be something to it. Any hints about this subject? TIA
__________________
Fisher's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2007, 11:45 AM   #6
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,384
I regularly make my own chicken stock, but not beef.

If you buy canned stocks, buy the low salt so you have more flexibility. I also have chicken and beef base on hand to intensify flavors. Again, look for the lower salt brands or options as they can add a lot fo salt.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2007, 11:55 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 3,619
Thanks so much, Andy. I didn't know they came in low-salt varieties but it makes sense.
__________________
Fisher's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2007, 12:11 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Yes, the low sodium canned broths allow you much more flexibility with seasoning.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2007, 12:17 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 3,619
I definitely need flexibility, Jennyema. I don't seem to have a natural knack for seasoning things. I am trying to learn that if a little is good, a lot is not better.
__________________
Fisher's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2007, 12:58 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
I definitely need flexibility, Jennyema. I don't seem to have a natural knack for seasoning things. I am trying to learn that if a little is good, a lot is not better.
That's a really good lesson to learn! Rememebr you can always add more.
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.