"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-02-2005, 08:06 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Sandyj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 577
Charcoal Steak

My husband often buys something from our local supermarket (am I allowed to say the name of the store?): it's called a charcoal steak - usually about 1/2 inch or so thick and well marbled. It's very inexpensive - two pieces (one will be enough for one person) wrapped together cost under $3.00. He does it on the bar-b-cue (we call this braai) basting it with a bit of Worcestershire sauce and Knorr's Aromat. It is absolutely delicious - nicer than anyone else's steak that I've had on the bar-b-cue (except when we buy fillet). Here's the question - we've never seen this "cut" of meat at any other supermarket - what is it, do you think? - Sandyj

__________________

__________________
Sandyj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2005, 01:28 AM   #2
Traveling Welcome Wagon
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere, US
Posts: 15,973
Hi Sandyj,

I did a search and found this:

In the meat industry many meat department use what is termed "fanciful names", these may be common to a particular area or just made up to sound more appealing. "Patio Steak" is one such name, in Wisconsin and Michigan where I travel, it is most commonly used to describe a steak cut from the front shoulder of the steer. This steak is also known as a: Top Blade Steak, Butter Steak, Charcoal Steak, Finger Steak, Chicken Steak, or Petite Steak if taken from the Top Blade Muscle. If taken from the English muscle it may be called an English, Ranch, or Bread & Butter Steak. The bottom line is to ask the meat cutter in your supermarket, where they cut it from and how it is best prepared.

Barbara
(wow, when I pasted that in here, it changed the color of my name too! lol)
__________________

__________________
Barbara L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2005, 01:51 AM   #3
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
I'm with Barbara - ask the butcher! They are the ones who cut and named it - they will be able to tell you where it came from.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2005, 10:19 PM   #4
Sous Chef
 
Sandyj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 577
Once again...Thanks!

Thanks for that information, and, yes, I shall ring the bell and summon the butcher and ask. I have tried, once in a while, to talk to the butcher at the supermarket where we shop most often, but I seem to arrive on days when the only folks at the back are helpers who don't understand what I'm asking. In our area of New Jersey, there are not very many actual butcher shops. I actually approached one in our town and asked if I could buy the casings to make sausages (South African boerewors). Sadly, it turned out that the shop I was in was not an actual butcher, but more of a 'meat boutique'). I've heard there's one in Dumont that a friend of mine (from New Zealand) found. Anyhoo, I believe that the description that you found is accurate. Honestly, these humble cuts are really nice on the grill. They seem to have two sides - a really tender one, like a filet side, and one that's less tender (but never tough). Because everyone is so very concerned about fatty meat, and these are well marbled, I've thought this might be the reason they're not well known. - Again, Thanks!
__________________
Sandyj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2005, 11:56 PM   #5
Cook
 
Tater Tot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandyj
My husband often buys something from our local supermarket (am I allowed to say the name of the store?): it's called a charcoal steak - usually about 1/2 inch or so thick and well marbled. It's very inexpensive - two pieces (one will be enough for one person) wrapped together cost under $3.00. He does it on the bar-b-cue (we call this braai) basting it with a bit of Worcestershire sauce and Knorr's Aromat. It is absolutely delicious - nicer than anyone else's steak that I've had on the bar-b-cue (except when we buy fillet). Here's the question - we've never seen this "cut" of meat at any other supermarket - what is it, do you think? - Sandyj
Its called a Chuck Eye it comes from where the chuck meets the Rib Eye.. You must shop at Albertsons for They call it a charcoal steak there (at least they did when I cut meat there) ..If your getting two good size peices there then go somewhere else.. The smaller peices are alot more tender and have tons more flavor.. But there hard to find because many meat cutters keep them for their own grill..Yes they are cheep and great but you only get about 8 to 10 steaks per cow....Look for the smaller ones...
__________________
Tater Tot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 04:24 AM   #6
Sous Chef
 
Sandyj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 577
Shoprite's Charcoal Steaks

Hi,
Thanks for that information. I wish I was more knowledgeable about cuts of meat - I've been trying to pay more attention. We shop at Shoprite, mostly. My husband bought some of these steaks this past Sunday, and commented that they had sold them using a different name. Must be a new butcher in town! By good size pieces, I mean a piece of meat about 3/4 to 1/2 inch thick that covers the palm and fingers of my hand. One side of the piece is more tender than the other. Is that still too big?
Sandyj
__________________
Sandyj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2005, 12:47 AM   #7
Cook
 
Tater Tot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 52
There kinda hard to tell...if the peices are less then an inch thick then they are worthless on the grill..but if they are look for ones about 3 fingers wide with nice marbling and no clear fat or silver....
__________________
Tater Tot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2008, 01:38 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1
finger steaks

I also shop at Shoprite; here they are called Foodland now, and I have been seeing these little finger steaks. They are about the size of the palm of the hand, and they are well marbled and more inexpensive than most, but they have a line running down the middle of them that looks more like connective tissue or gristle than it does fat. I have some marinating right now along with some strip steaks just in case we don't like the finger steaks.
I looked up recipes for finger steaks and it seems most of them are like chicken fingers, cut into strips and deep fried, which we try to avoid. If any of you have had these types of finger steaks on the grill, please let me know, and if you have any good recipes for marinades for them I would appreciate it.

Thanks for a good forum, I am happy I found ya'll.
__________________

__________________
shebeshela is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]