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Old 12-20-2006, 03:42 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Essiebunny
I received a 2 pound chateaubriand as a gift. How do I prepare it and what do I serve with it?
There will be 4 of us eating.
Congratulations, Essie! What a fabulous gift! That's a lot of meat for four people, unless you're feeding the backfield of the Chicago Bears, tho...

I would agree with the suggestion to sear it on both sides and finish it in a hot oven to 125... I'd only season it with grey sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, and my preferred sauce is Marchand de Vin, also known as Wine Merchant's Sauce. I hope you have a couple of bottles of great Bordeaux to go with that outrageous piece of meat!

Wine Merchant’s Sauce:

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
3 tablespoons finely chopped shallots
¾ cup dry red wine (such as Côtes du Rhône or Zinfandel)
another ½ cup of the wine
3 tablespoons additional butter
freshly ground pepper and sea salt to taste

1. Pour off the fat from the pan, but do not wash it. The particles of caramelized meat juices adhering to the pan will contribute to the success of your sauce.


2. Add 1 tablespoon butter and the shallots to the hot pan. Sauté the shallots over low heat for about 3 minutes, then pour in the red wine. Raise the heat and cook until the wine is reduced to almost a syrup. Add the ½ cup wine, and reduce again. This time, leave a little more juice (about 1/3 cup in all). Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the remaining butter, 1 tablespoon at a time, until it is absorbed and the sauce is thickened. Add freshly ground pepper and taste before adding salt. It may very well be salty enough.


3. To serve, arrange the meat on hot plates. Stir into the sauce any juices that have accumulated on the plate during the meat¹s rest. Nap the meat with the sauce, sprinkle with the finely chopped parsley, and serve.
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Old 12-20-2006, 03:50 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDP
Be sure to pull it out and let it set a good 2 hours to let it temper a bit. I have also been playing around with smoked paprika and have made a simple rub of 1 part granulated garlic and salt, 2 parts smoked hot paprika that would be a great seasoning and would work well with the Bearnaise sauce. Your searing temp can't be white hot though as it would burn the paprika. I just did a similar thing last night but I stuffed the tenderloin with a Spanish style chorizo stuffing. Although if you were trying to get 4 portions ( depending on the size of your Chateau) stuffing it could yield more servings.

JDP
Adding some spinach and a bit of bread crumbs to your stuffing might be good also.
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Old 12-20-2006, 04:57 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Candocook
Adding some spinach and a bit of bread crumbs to your stuffing might be good also.
????? I wouldn't stuff a Chateaubriand with anything. I surely might serve a spinach dish alongside the steak, but I wouldn't be messing with that glorious piece of meat.

(just mho)
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Old 12-20-2006, 05:00 PM   #14
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I'm with ChefJune on this - just say no to stuffing.

My first experience eating this "glorious piece of meat" was in a glorious setting as well:

A dinner cruise on the Seine through Paris.

Sigh.........
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Old 12-20-2006, 05:09 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
I'm with ChefJune on this - just say no to stuffing.

My first experience eating this "glorious piece of meat" was in a glorious setting as well:

A dinner cruise on the Seine through Paris.

Sigh.........
Just reading that made me sigh....... shoooot! they could have served you sauteed cardboard and it would probably have tasted great in that setting!
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Old 12-20-2006, 05:11 PM   #16
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I was wearing my red silk dress that night, too.

Yep, cardboard would have melted in my mouth.
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