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Old 12-23-2006, 01:54 PM   #11
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It's done when the thermometer you have says it's done!

I preheat to 250F, stick the roast in and immediately turn it down to 200F. Slowly roast until a thermometer inserted into the thickest portion of the meat registers 130F, then pull the roast. Rest it beneath some tented foil and increase the oven temp to 500F. Put the roast back into the box and roast for 10-15min, just enough to render the exterior fat and brown the muscular tissue.

Rest another 15-20min, then carve n' serve! You want to cook with as gentle a heat as possible which will keep those ugly bands of well-done/gray meat from polluting the outer layers of the roast. The above method will yield a medium/medium-rare doneness from the center of the roast almost all the way to the exterior.

Just my two cents of course.
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Old 12-23-2006, 02:55 PM   #12
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A great big thanks to all for your input. It appears the common denominator in all responses is the need for a remote ther. and staring at my three conventional ones on the weekend before Christmas with five hours to go before serving time, is not going to earn me very many points for planning. The only thing I can do at this point is to take a calculated shot at some "blended" amount of time between 1 and 2 roasts and hope to err on the rare side. I promise to keep a stiff journalistic upper lip and report the results, success or disaster.
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Old 12-23-2006, 03:11 PM   #13
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I understand your "ice cube" analogy, however it doesn`t Quite work like that, the Initial load will require more energy sure (you oven stays ON for longer) but that`s the internal thermostat, it`s acutaly compensated for.
what you have is latent heat LAG, it won`t take twice as long to melt 2 cubes as one as it`s not what`s called a "Closed system" you`de be looking a 1/3`rd extra time max depending on volume.
Now then, Surface area is fascinating in that it does Plenty to compensate for this over time :)
(it`s even classes a reaction accelerant), put them in according to instructions and give them 1/3 extra time (it`s not linear like you`de expect).
and certainly use the thermometer!

hehehe I`m somewhat envious that you have Beef ribs there too, I can`t get them here for love nor money.
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Old 12-23-2006, 04:43 PM   #14
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Interesting. At least you're willing to commit to an extra amount of time and quantify it. I certainly agree with your initial load approach. Then if we have a recipe that calls for 500F for one hour, then turn oven off and sit for two hours, would you surmise that it would be reasonable to increase the 500F time, but leave the 2 hour time the same...on the theory that the additional "ice cube" would be absorbed in the first heating phase?
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Old 12-23-2006, 07:26 PM   #15
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I did Prime Rib (boneless) for the local homeless shelter for Christmas last year & I'm doing it again this year. :-) Here are my notes from last year for cooking it:

BEEF - Let sit outside at room temp. for 1 hour. Preheat oven to 475.
Bake for 30 minutes. Reduce heat to 325. Continue roasting until internal temp. reaches between 130 - 145. Meat will continue to cook when removed from oven. Let sit for 15 minutes before carving.

I did a lot of research because I was cooking such a large quantity of expensive meat for someone else. I'm doing 34 lbs this year. It's 34 lbs divided between 2 roasts. Last year, after talking to the butcher, I cut the roasts into smaller pieces & I will do the same again this year. I remember going to the shelter the evening before to cut the roasts & rub them with an oil/seasoning mixture, stuck some garlic into slits & refrigerated it overnight.

I don't know if this helps you or not - I sure hope so! Best of luck!
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Old 12-23-2006, 09:13 PM   #16
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The recipe I use calls for starting the roast(s) at 450 for 25 minutes and then turning the oven down to 350 for 16 minutes per pound until the internal temperature reaches 135-140 for medium rare. The meat thermometer is, as you see, an essential instrument here. Doing the garlic slits thing is another tasty thing to do. Good luck. Seems a lot of folks are doing rib roasts this year.
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Old 12-23-2006, 11:19 PM   #17
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[quote=atty]A great big thanks to all for your input. It appears the common denominator in all responses is the need for a remote ther. and staring at my three conventional ones on the weekend before Christmas with five hours to go before serving time, is not going to earn me very many points for planning.


It does NOT need to be a remote thermometer. You can get instant read thermometers for $5, if you had time to shop. They can be easily had in the supermarket aisle for $14 or so.
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Old 12-23-2006, 11:27 PM   #18
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Well Folks, here's the autopsy report. Viewer discretion is advised. As long as we're listing all the reasons why this train derailed killing all aboard, let me start off by saying that my oven is a DCS, and for those of you that are not stateside, it is a home version of a commercial oven....that is to say it is no slouch.

The recipe was 5 min/lb at 500F, then two hours at oven off. My "blended" time for two roasts was 4 min/lb at 500F, then the same two hours for oven off. The result was a disastrous 155F on one and 145F on the other. Suffice it to say that my crematorium had no trouble with 2 roasts, and I suspect it would not have blinked at 5. So if anyone had any questions about the number of roasts vs. cooking time, I'd have to say fahgedda 'bout it!! Obviously this venture will not happen again without a remote therm., but I have to wonder how they did it in the old days without such a wonderful technology. For a first timer, it would have to be a lot of luck.

Thanks again for the thoughts. I'm off to resole a few pairs of old shoes with 20 lbs of prime rib.
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Old 12-24-2006, 09:34 AM   #19
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Yeah, go much over 140 (on the finsihed side) and you're talking gray football. Roasting quickly at high temps also produces bands of overcooked gray meat around a juicy red/pink center. Low and slow is the way to go (along with a thermometer of course)!

Sorry to hear about your expensive experiment gone south...
Make a solid beef gravy and serve the slices of roast covered in that over some mashed taters.
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Old 12-24-2006, 09:48 AM   #20
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erm, perhaps I should have made it a little more clear instead of assuming you`de know this, but the same effect I mentioned on the Heating side also effects the Cooling side too, with that Mass of product in there at the correct temp, it would also take longer to cool too (latent heat energy).

consider this though: "there`s no such thing as a failed Experiment, Only more Data" :)
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