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Old 11-08-2008, 08:09 AM   #1
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Cooking time for standing rib roast

Hey everyone,
I have a bone-in standing rib roast that I'm going to cook tonight. The butcher says its big enough to feed 18 healthy eaters; I think he said 7 ribs but I'm not sure.
I'm going to sear it on the stove top and cook it at 225. I'm aiming for a temp of 130 degrees, and I have a meat thermometer.
Only... about how many hours should I give it?
The butcher wouldn't say, because he's never roasted it at a temp that low, so all he would say is "use a thermometer".
But I need some kind of ball park so my guests don't have to wait til midnight!
I saw 6.5 hours somewhere on the web, but that was for medium.
Any suggestions?
Thanks!

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Old 11-08-2008, 08:21 AM   #2
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Here is how I roast a standing rib roast - got this recipe from a butcher years ago and it works like a charm:

Standing Rib Roast

Preheat oven to 425

Remove roast from packaging and place on a rack. Rub seasoning all over it(I use Lawyrs seasoning salt, garlic powder and pepper). You can season the roast up to 1 hour before you roast it.

Place rack inside of a large roasting pan. Put a small amount of water into the bottom of the pan.

Place roast in 425 degree oven and roast for 45 minutes. This will sear the meat and help lock in the juices.

After 45 minutes, turn the oven off and leave the roast in the oven for 3 hours. DO NOT open the door during this time period.

About 2 hours before serving, insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the roast. Turn oven back onto to 325 degrees. Roast until internal temp on meat thermometer reaches 145 degrees (for medium center. TIme will vary depending upon the size of your roast.

Remove from the oven, let it rest 15 minutes before carving.


I love this recipe because I dont have to be in the kitchen, I can roast it during the day/afternoon and not have to baby it until the end cooking time.
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Old 11-08-2008, 08:23 AM   #3
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I just noticed you only want to get to 130 degrees - that is REALLY RARE - I don't know, but that might be too rare. I think the roast would be at 130 after 3 hours in the oven, if you follow the recipe I posted.

good luck - and enjoy
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Old 11-08-2008, 09:15 AM   #4
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Standing Rib Roast

This is a tried and true method. It will give you a nice crust and perfect doneness every time. The only issue is that you cannot use the oven for other cooking at the same time but the roast will keep for a while as you get other stuff ready.


1 Ea Standing Rib Roast
TT Salt and Black Pepper
1/4 C Flour

Preheat the oven to 500 F.

Just before putting the roast into the oven, rub it with salt, pepper, and flour.

The timing of the cooking is based upon the number of ribs and the degree of doneness you want. Multiply the number of ribs by 12 minutes for rare, 13 minutes for medium rare, and 14 for medium. For example, if you have a 4 rib roast and want it to be medium rare, you would calculate 4x13=52 minutes.

Place the roast into the 500 F oven and cook it for the prescribed time.


DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR ONCE YOU PUT IN THE ROAST.

After the calculated cooking time, shut off the oven and don't open the OVEN door.

Leave the roast in the oven for at least and hour and a half (and up to three hours. There will be no change in the degree of doneness).
Do not open the oven door during this time.

After the 90-180 minutes, remove the roast and cover it with foil and let it rest for 30 minutes before carving.
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Old 11-08-2008, 09:19 AM   #5
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The following is just my opinion.
1) I think 225 is too low on the oven
2) I would worry that with 7 ribs, you might have problems with the center being at a way different degree of doneness than the ends and outside.
3) Again, my opinion, I would consider cutting it into two roasts, say 3 and 4 ribs. Having 18 people is a big table, One at ether end might be easier to serve and the smaller roasts would cook more evenly.
4) You are obviously after slow cooking. Cool! Take a look at this.

Finally, these are my opinions on how I would do it. You are having a big dinner and I would want to to be a happy occasion for you. I am sure that others will add info. enjoy!

AC
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Old 11-08-2008, 09:40 AM   #6
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Thanks for the replies, everyone!
I'm kind of set on the slow-roasting idea, because I keep reading that it works best.
That article was helpful, Andy. Thanks!
I think I'm going to try 6.5 hrs and see what happens.
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Old 11-08-2008, 09:41 AM   #7
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by the way, Andy, if you did that two roast thing, would you cook them in the same roaster pan? or not? I only have one oven...
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Old 11-08-2008, 01:22 PM   #8
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The same roaster pan would be fine, hopefully, it is large enough to leave some air space between them.
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Old 11-10-2008, 07:26 AM   #9
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Update:
I left the roast whole, due to pan and space constraints, seared it, and put an internal thermometer (the kind you read from outside the oven) in it. I put it in the oven at 225 6 hours before I wanted it to be done. It was an 18 pound roast, and I think it would have cooked to rare in about 5 hours; it was cooking too quickly so I lowered the temperature to 200 after 3 hours to slow it down, then raised the temperature back up again for the last hour. I cooked it to 137 degrees, since the internal temperature doesn't raise much after you take it out when you slow roast it. It turned out perfectly! In fact, I think next time I might take it out even a little earlier: it was more medium rare than rare.
Oh, and with the slow roasting, there wasn't a huge difference in done-ness anywhere in the roast. It was a little more rare in the center, but not a lot.
Thanks for all the help!
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