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Old 10-23-2006, 03:19 AM   #21
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Mmmmm, Corned Silverside with Mustard Sauce. I simmer my C'Beef in water with golden syrup and malt vinegar added. No salt. The water needs to have a balance of sweet and sour so if you are going to try this way, taste the water!. For a 2 kg piece of beef just covered with water, I would use about 2 to 3 tablespoons vinegar and same of golden syrup.
Also in pot are whole peeled onions, whole peeled carrots, parsley stalks, orange rind, bay leaves and peppercorns.
Toward end of cooking I salt the water a little and add kumara and potatos. Cabbage done seperately of course and I never add water to cook it, just the rinsing water attached. When done its lots of butter and black pepper.

For the sauce, beat 2 eggs with 2 tablespoons sugar. Put into pan and add 4 tsps dry mustard powder and 2 tablespoons plain flour. Stir to combine and then add 2 cups of the cooking liquid and 1/2 cup malt vinegar. Cook on low heat until thickened, stirring. Add salt and pepper if required.
This sauce should have a sweetness cut with the acid of the vinegar. It is my favourite sauce with corned beef.
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Old 10-23-2006, 04:23 AM   #22
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Oh! Lyn, that sauce sounds just me, and here I am having to have sausages and vegies for dinner.
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Old 10-23-2006, 05:41 AM   #23
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I was brought up that way, too...but have since discarded that method. I sear and braise the corned beef with sauteed onions and garlic and a bit of white wine.

I prefer to roast the potatoes after tossing them with olive oil and thyme, S&P.

I cut the cabbage into large chunks and sautee them in bacon fat with apples, a bit of marmalade, some cider vinegar and sherry.

I've got nothing against the all in one pot method, but I believe that method does no justice to the flavours of the individual foods.
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Old 10-23-2006, 05:54 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I used the following ingredients to make the brine for curing the fresh corned beef. You can choose any recipe you like, there are a ton on the internet.

5-6 Lb Beef Brisket
4 Qt Water
2 C Kosher Salt
2 C Brown Sugar
1 Tb Juniper Berries
2 tsp Allspice Berries
2 Bay Leaves
6 Garlic Cloves, peeled


Your butcher can get you a whole fresh brisket. Using a jacarding tool or similar implement, pierce the meat liberally on both sides. put it into an appropriately sized SS, ceramic or glass container.

Prepare the brine by combining all the ingredients and stirring until the salt and sugar are dissolved. Pour over the meat, cover and refrigerate for 10 days. You may want to weigh down the meat if it floats so it is completely submerged.

As this is a very salty mixture, use not materials that are prone to corrosion.

When the 10 days have passed, remove the meat and rinse it well in cold water. Cook as you would any corned beef.

And that's it?! You mean I could theoretically be eating real corned beef within a fortnight? This IS good news!

Okay Andy, I'm in ... but I'm confused by your next post re the spices. So you don't use the above recipe? What do you use? (and BTW, there will be zero possibility of me getting a commercial mix ready for corning, so bear that in mind please).

(And be nice. I know I teased you mercilessly about your blossom-strewn salt shaker, but that's no excuse to deliberately doctor this recipe, Andy, now is it?)
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Old 10-23-2006, 06:49 AM   #25
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Corned tounge was one of my favourite foods as a kid until I found out it was a real tounge.

I dont cook my vegies with the corned beef and and don't serve it with cabbage as I never really been keen on cooked cabbage (love cabbage in coleslaw and wombok/chinese cabbage in a thai chicken salad). I usually have it with white sauce with parsley if any but a horseradish cream sauce sounds a whole lot nicer.
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Old 10-23-2006, 07:10 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Miss J
Corned tounge was one of my favourite foods as a kid until I found out it was a real tounge.

I dont cook my vegies with the corned beef and and don't serve it with cabbage as I never really been keen on cooked cabbage (love cabbage in coleslaw and wombok/chinese cabbage in a thai chicken salad). I usually have it with white sauce with parsley if any but a horseradish cream sauce sounds a whole lot nicer.
That's why at my house if friends were over for dinner and we happened to be having tongue, we'd serve it sliced. Everybody loved it that way!

Hope you haven't given it up Little Miss J? It's one of the nicest meats around!
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Old 10-23-2006, 07:23 AM   #27
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I have given up on it I must admit. I think its a case of mind over matter though. Will have to conquer my fear/hesitations and try again!
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Old 10-23-2006, 10:03 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
And that's it?! You mean I could theoretically be eating real corned beef within a fortnight? This IS good news!

Okay Andy, I'm in ... but I'm confused by your next post re the spices. So you don't use the above recipe? What do you use? (and BTW, there will be zero possibility of me getting a commercial mix ready for corning, so bear that in mind please).

(And be nice. I know I teased you mercilessly about your blossom-strewn salt shaker, but that's no excuse to deliberately doctor this recipe, Andy, now is it?)
I'm always nice.

I don't make my own corned beef any more. I gave up trying to get the flavor I was looking for. The spice mix I listed above makes a tasty corned beef. It's just not what I wanted.

I was referring to buying commercial corned beef, NOT a commercial spice blend, I have never seen corned beef spices marketed separately.

When I was looking for spice blend recipes, I found plenty on the internet. Just google curing corned beef or something like that. There are a number of spices common to all the recipes and various others that can vary.

If you can't get corned beef you like (or can't get it at all), making it is easy, you just have to plan ahead.

Just make sure to use nothing in the curing process that can be corroded by salt. I did my first one in a cheapo SS pot that had some other metal for the rivets that held the lid handle on. The rivets corroded and the handle fell off. The SS was fine.
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Old 10-23-2006, 10:05 AM   #29
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I do mine exactly like that but I like to add whole peeled onions timed to just get done as the corned beef gets done. I like to have a whole onion to eat along with the taters, carrots and cabbage.

And I use straight horseradish as a condiment for the beef. And since I'm from the Southern part of the U.S. the bread is cornbread!

Leftovers go into classic Ruebens.
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Old 10-23-2006, 11:12 AM   #30
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Thank you Andy! Can't get it all here (the real stuff, that is) and I want to introduce my hubby to it, so this is great. Thanks for the hint regarding the corroding too!
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