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Old 10-25-2006, 04:56 PM   #31
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Sorry I took so long to post.
I forgot all about it!
Short on time, so at least here are a couple shots.
I'll post recipes/notes tomorrow.

My Old Stand-By Recipe


My Old Stand-By upgraded w/Creamy Horseradish White Sauce


#2 is good!
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Old 10-28-2006, 11:32 PM   #32
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Two words; Guinness extra stout. Well that's three words, & here's a few more.
  • 4 pounds corned beef brisket
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 (12 fluid ounce) can or bottle Irish stout beer (e.g. Guinness®)
DIRECTIONS
  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Rinse the beef completely and pat dry.
  2. Place the brisket on rack in a roasting pan or Dutch oven. Rub the brown sugar on the corned beef to coat entire beef, including the bottom. Pour the bottle of stout beer around, and gently over the beef to wet the sugar.
  3. Cover, and place in preheated oven. Bake for 2 1/2 hours. Basting often. Allow to rest 5 minutes before slicing.
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Old 10-29-2006, 01:01 AM   #33
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Andy, I use pink salt to make my corned beef. Do you use it in your brine or the simple salt sugar brine mix above. My method is nearly the same but I view corned meat as a "cure". Without the insta-cure you don't get the pink color. I only brine for 5 days as that is what I was taught.

Also I usually have corned pork -Boston Butt- as we like the texture better than brisket.
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Old 10-29-2006, 10:55 AM   #34
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I use kosher salt and get gray corned beef. The pink color for the meat is not a big deal for me. I grew up with the gray stuff.
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Old 10-30-2006, 12:26 AM   #35
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Quote:
I use kosher salt and get gray corned beef. The pink color for the meat is not a big deal for me. I grew up with the gray stuff.
I was confused by this and have found that at least in the northeast it is quite common to brine briskets as you do, Andy, and still refer to the product as corned beef. I've never had it so now I'll have to try it and see th3e difference in taste.

Most have never had their own 'Corned Beef 'made at home so I think most think of store bought that is corned with nitrites as well as the rest of the brine. Easy to spot, it is pink meat. the sodium nitrites are what gives corned meat and ham and and bacon and hotdogs and... their pink color and unique taste.

I will give here the Ruhlman book, Charcuterie version of corned beef:

1 gal water
2 cups Kosher salt
1/2 cup sugar
1 oz pink salt*
3 garlic cloves minced
2tablespoons pickling spice

5# brisket well marbled (first cut) beef [as I said before I use pork Boston butt instead]


1 place brisket in cooled brine, weight down to keep submerged refrigerate for 5 days. [ my note: after this time it starts getting too salty and can start to get mushy]

2 Remove and rinse it thoroughly.

3 cook as above for about 3 hours- water should always just cover brisket- or until fork tender

4 slice and eat


I think the above covers how to cook it in many well thought out manors so all I'm really trying to illustrate is how to make and use your own. Corning is a way to preserve meat for another time rather than eat it now, otherwise lets brine for flavor and eat it now.

*pink salt is a mix of 93.75% pure salt [NaCl}like we all know and 6.25% potassium nitrite another salt
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Old 10-31-2006, 01:59 PM   #36
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Jeese, sorry I forgot the white sauce recipe. It's a slightly modified version of the one in the CIA text.

Horseradish White Sauce

2-C Bechamel Sauce
4-fl.oz Heavy Cream
2-oz Ground Horseradish
Freshly Ground White Pepper & Kosher Salt

Make the bechamel using 50% whole milk and 50% corned beef cooking liquid for the fluids. Whisk in the the cream and horseradish, and simmer until it reaches a good consistency. Season with the freshly ground white pepper and kosher salt. Strain through a fine mesh filter to remove any fibrous horseradish bits (if desired).

I tossed the potato and carrot wedges with some of the sauce. It is perfumed with the aroma of all the meat and vegetables from using some cooking liquid in the bechamel, and has just enough richness to complement the veggies. I drizzled a bit over the meat as well. It's definetly the way I will make CB&C when doing the "Boil" method from now on! The milk/cream balance the sharpness of the horseradish so that it's primarily just the flavor that comes through (which goes excellent with the flavors of the cabbage and corned beef).

I still want to try a braised version with beer too. I'd also like to try and make my own someday!
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Old 10-31-2006, 02:05 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thumpershere2
We love corned beef and cabbage and I cook it like you do Nicholas, all in one pot. Beef, cabbage and carrots and then I put it all on one large platter and set on the table.Now I'm really getting hungry
While I adore the saltiness of corned beef brisket, I tend to think the cabbage tastes overly salty if I cook it all together. When the brisket is done (I often use a crock-pot for the brisket and cook it on LOW for hours), I quarter the cabbage and place the wedges in a steamer basket in a large pot. I add a ladel-full of the cooking liquid from the brisket and steam the cabbage over it until tender. Works a charm!

Fraidy
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Old 10-31-2006, 02:48 PM   #38
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I soak the corned beef prior to cooking to get some of the salt out so the end product is not so salty.
Re pink salt? Is this the gourmet variety of salt? That is usually used as a final sprinkle, not in a brine where it is dissolved as NaCl. I think the pink of corned beef is created by a curing product such as nitrites which aren't present in most home corned beef recipes.
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Old 11-01-2006, 08:05 AM   #39
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Quote:
Re pink salt? Is this the gourmet variety of salt?
No, the pink is added to the mix of 93+% normal kosher salt and 6+% potassium nitrite that are used as a cure so that you don't use it by mistake for regular salt. It is called by other names as well, one being insta-cure #1- I think that is the name given by [ butcher-packer.com ] Butcher & Packer Supply Company out of Detroit.

For those interested in preserving - really another subject for another forum - let me recommend the book I referenced above Charcuterie by Micheal Ruhlman & Brian Polcyn; a really great book.

Lastly, FraidKnot is right about the cabbage, I like his steamer method but often will steam Brussels sprouts instead of the big cabbage.
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Old 11-24-2006, 08:31 PM   #40
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corned beef stock

hi........has anyone made a successful soup from the left over stock. I hate throwing it out, I have tried to make a soup but it is missing something???
Any suggestions peeps??
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