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Old 03-18-2011, 09:17 PM   #11
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Thank you for the recipe Goodweed. I have 4 airtight containers, each big enough for a 4 pound brisket. And with my new Foodsaver! I'll be able to create my own low-sodium corned beef.
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Old 03-18-2011, 10:21 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
I bought one extra for the freezer, at 3.69/lb (I think). Brisket are hard to come by here as it is. I've got one soaking right now. I'm going to turn it into pastrami tomorrow.
CAn you elaborate on how you will do this? I ended up with an extra CB brisket, when I added lamb to our menu in order to have a low sodium entree. I keep hearing "just smoke it", but that's kinda vague, LOL.
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Old 03-18-2011, 10:47 PM   #13
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I heard that years ago, around the Depression Era, corned beef was almost a throw away meat. It was considered "poor food" - and very cheap. I guess as it became more popular, it also became more expensive. Ours was around $13.00 and excellent after cooking 8 hours in the crockpot, I almost didn't need a knife to slice it. My only regret is that St. Patricks's Day comes but once a year - then again, what's that got to do with it?
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Old 03-19-2011, 07:10 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by NoraC View Post
CAn you elaborate on how you will do this? I ended up with an extra CB brisket, when I added lamb to our menu in order to have a low sodium entree. I keep hearing "just smoke it", but that's kinda vague, LOL.
It's my first time trying this and there are lots of different methods I came across. The method I am going to use is; Soak for 6 hours in water, changing the water every two. Rince and rub with black pepper, corriander and garlic powder (I went 3:1:1).... these steps are already done and it's been in the fridge overnight in plastic wrap. In a couple hours I'm going to put it on the smoker, a Weber Smokey Mountain, with maple wood and smoke at 200-225F until the meat gets to 165F. Then let cool and slice thin. Just about everyone agreed to use a mild wood and to keep your temps on the cool side of 225.

Now, I read several recipes that said to take to 200F, like you typically do for brisket, but one I found said you don't need to since the beef was corned, or brined... that it will be tender and done and 165. So we'll see It made sense to me.
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Old 03-19-2011, 10:28 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
It's my first time trying this and there are lots of different methods I came across. The method I am going to use is; Soak for 6 hours in water, changing the water every two. Rince and rub with black pepper, corriander and garlic powder (I went 3:1:1).... these steps are already done and it's been in the fridge overnight in plastic wrap. In a couple hours I'm going to put it on the smoker, a Weber Smokey Mountain, with maple wood and smoke at 200-225F until the meat gets to 165F. Then let cool and slice thin. Just about everyone agreed to use a mild wood and to keep your temps on the cool side of 225.

Now, I read several recipes that said to take to 200F, like you typically do for brisket, but one I found said you don't need to since the beef was corned, or brined... that it will be tender and done and 165. So we'll see It made sense to me.
Thanks!
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Old 03-19-2011, 12:09 PM   #16
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Well done Goodweed, the brine is similar to the one I use but I add salt peter, the next thing you should try is Ox Tongue
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Old 03-19-2011, 01:57 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
It's my first time trying this and there are lots of different methods I came across. The method I am going to use is; Soak for 6 hours in water, changing the water every two. Rince and rub with black pepper, corriander and garlic powder (I went 3:1:1).... these steps are already done and it's been in the fridge overnight in plastic wrap. In a couple hours I'm going to put it on the smoker, a Weber Smokey Mountain, with maple wood and smoke at 200-225F until the meat gets to 165F. Then let cool and slice thin. Just about everyone agreed to use a mild wood and to keep your temps on the cool side of 225.

Now, I read several recipes that said to take to 200F, like you typically do for brisket, but one I found said you don't need to since the beef was corned, or brined... that it will be tender and done and 165. So we'll see It made sense to me.
Are you starting with fresh brisket or with corned beef? If with fresh brisket, why soak it first? If it's fresh brisket, then it isn't corned beef without salt in the process, even though it will probably taste like corned beef.
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Old 03-19-2011, 02:45 PM   #18
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To make a corned beef, you start with a fresh beef brisket and soak it in a seasoned brine. Soaking it in the brine makes it corned. Most corned beef is made with the brisket cut but other cuts of beef can also be corned.
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Old 03-19-2011, 02:57 PM   #19
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Are you starting with fresh brisket or with corned beef? If with fresh brisket, why soak it first? If it's fresh brisket, then it isn't corned beef without salt in the process, even though it will probably taste like corned beef.
I'm using one of the two corned beefs I bought and mentioned earlier in this thread. It is recommended they be soaked, even for smoking and turning into pastrami.

You know, it's kind of funny. People brine foods all the time and don't soak them to remove the brine taste before cooking, yet for corned beef soaking is recommended. Is that because it has been packaged?
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Old 03-19-2011, 03:10 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
I'm using one of the two corned beefs I bought and mentioned earlier in this thread. It is recommended they be soaked, even for smoking and turning into pastrami.

You know, it's kind of funny. People brine foods all the time and don't soak them to remove the brine taste before cooking, yet for corned beef soaking is recommended. Is that because it has been packaged?
Corned beef has a lot of salt in it and needs to be washed to remove excess salt from the surface. If you are going to poach it, much of that salt will be drawn into the fresh water, rendering the meat edible. If you are going to grill, or smoke it, the soaking is done to remove the excess salt.

The same is true of a country smoked ham that has been cured in salt, and then smoked in a smokehouse. If you try to eat it straight from the processor, it is so salty that it is inedible, and must be poached before baking. Remember, corning is a method that was used to preserve the meat with little or no refrigeration. The salt inhibited the growth of organisms that are dangerous, and that spoil the meat. Corning is just another salting/curing method, albeit with the addition of pickling spices to enhance the meat flavor.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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beef, brisket, kossher salt, pickling spice, recipe

Corned Beef Brisket Made my first ever corned beef from scratch. It was so easy that it was rediculous. I simply followed what appeared to be a good recipe and technique after googling "Corned Beef Recipe". I mixed kosher salt and sugar with water, brought it to a boil to dissolve the solids, and let it cool. I added about 3 tbs. pickling spice to the water, placed the brisket into a gallon size plastic zipper bag, Added the brine/spice mixture, and let it sit in the fridge at abotu 35'F. for 5 days. I took it out of the bag, washed it to remove excess salt and spices, put it into the slow cooker, covered with water, and let it go for the night, and the next work day. The flavor was much better than the store bought corned beef. I will be doing this again.:biggrin: It was sooooo tender and flavorful. Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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