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Old 11-16-2009, 02:31 PM   #1
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Cuts that only look like short rib

I've gotten what my store calls "simmering ribs" which look pretty close to the chunks of short rib that I've gotten there before, but hey definitely don't cook like real short ribs. after some cooking they get tougher & there's no fat to skim off when they're done. what did i actually buy?

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Old 11-16-2009, 02:56 PM   #2
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Short ribs come from where a riding saddle would set if you were to put a saddle on a cow or steer. It's a very tasty cut, but not necessarily tender and sometimes requires special treatment, such as butterflying the meat beside each of the ribs using an accordian cut - laying it out in a long ribbon, just as the Koreans do, and then BBQing for a long time, or one of the most popular methods, and my favorite, is braising.

Your ribs were still tough because you most likely haven't cooked it long enough. Tender meat comes from breaking down the colligen with heat applied for a long enough time to melt it. Short cooking times only serve to cause the colligen to draw up like a spring and tighten everything it's attached to. If it looks done on the outside but is still tough, it was probably cooked at too high a temperature for too short a time. Low and slow or paper thin and quick is the only way to go for certain cuts of meat. With ribs, low and slow no matter what method you use.
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Old 11-16-2009, 04:51 PM   #3
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so 2 hrs of braising in beer at low heat isn't enough? it was barely bubbling & I kept the meat on the outsides of the pan to keep them from cooking too fast. out of curiosity i went to another store & found the same things labelled "short ribs, brisket-style" which makes me think I'm getting somewhere. a guy at the first store tried to tell me there was no difference between the two kinds except that one had the bone in & the other didn't, which sounded like a enormous load of |3(_)115/-/!7, even to a naif like me. the real short rib (bone in, unlike what i got) had way more marbling & just by looking at it i could tell there's be lots of skimming when it was done. so if they took the bone out it would lose all its marbling? now i wonder what the difference between brisket-style short ribs are and real ones. i bet the brisket-style has a real name too.
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Old 11-16-2009, 05:22 PM   #4
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Retailers have gotten into the habit of creatively labeling meats. Your "simmering ribs" were probably cut from the brisket and sold with a different name for a higher price.

This is also done with meat cut from the pork shoulder and sold as boneless country-style ribs.

Stick with the original cuts rather than the creative ones. Besides, the bones add flavor to your braise that would be missing with boneless cuts..
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Old 11-16-2009, 05:31 PM   #5
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Stick with the original cuts rather than the creative ones. Besides, the bones add flavor to your braise that would be missing with boneless cuts..
i wanted the boneless ones because i can't brown the side that has the bone on it but maybe you're right. i think that's what i've learned after getting burned a couple times. buyer beware...

so if it actually is brisket just packaged as "boneless short rib" or whatever what can I do with it, since all I've got it 4 chunks that might be ~4oz each?
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Old 11-16-2009, 05:41 PM   #6
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Cut off thin slices ACROSS THE GRAIN and use them to make Chinese pepper steak. It won't be tough at all.

Here's a recipe.
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Old 11-16-2009, 06:03 PM   #7
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throw in crockpot. cook til falling off bones. use for tacos, burritos. really good. some times i add a sauce , sweet and sour, etc and serve over rice. can also make a yummy sorta sloppy joe on buns.
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Old 11-16-2009, 07:29 PM   #8
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Quote:
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...so 2 hrs of braising in beer at low heat isn't enough? .
Absolutely not, not the way you discribe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by baking fool View Post
... a guy at the first store tried to tell me there was no difference between the two kinds except that one had the bone in & the other didn't,.
I think it's quite possible that he is right.
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Old 11-17-2009, 08:20 PM   #9
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even though i was tempted to try out andy's recipe yesterday I just got mad & decided I was going to cook them until they softened up, which they did. so now i feel like a major ******* because i tried cookng them for 4:45 this time & they turned out just as i remembered them. i guess i forgot how long I cooked them last time, which was months ago. at least the guys at the store won't find out that i've been dissing them online
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