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Old 02-11-2012, 03:01 PM   #1
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Divine Dublin Cornbeef For St. Paddy´s

Here is my take on Saint Patrick´s ...

Since, I like piquant cuisines, I serve with Horse radish Dip and Mustards.

Firstly, to eliminate the rotten egg aroma of cabbage, which is a Brassica genre vegetable along with Brussel Sprouts, Cauliflower and Broccoli; if overcooked, cabbage green or red emits sulfide, and to minimize this horrible aroma, here are some suggestions:

1) chop the cabbage in small wedges
2) make sure, water is boiling rapidly with salt, before dropping the wedges in
3) the more rapidly, you boil, the less chance of the rotten egg aromas
4) DO NOT COVER ( this prevents the possibilities of gas forming and prevents the stinky sulfide aromas.)

Divine Dublin Cornbeef for St. Paddy´s :

1 orange
4 1/2 pound Cornbeef Brisket rinsed
20 whole cloves
4 tsps caraway seeds
2 1/2 pounds Small Potatoes
Cabbage cut into wedges
salt and pepper

1) stud the orange with the cloves in large stock pot
2) add cornbeef, caraway seeds and salt water to cover to boil.
3) reducing flame, to Medium Low, cover and simmer 3 hours until tender
4) boil the small potatoes until tender in salted water
5) in another large pot, place the wedges of cabbage in boiling salted water and as quickly as possible boil on high flame uncovered ( 8 to 10 mins )
6) carve meat and place on large platter
7) drain the cabbage and the potatoes and place around the cornbeef
8) take meat stock and pass thru a sieve
9) place stock in a saucepan, with a little flour and seasoning, and stir frequently until thickened
10) put in sauceboat
11) serve with Irish Beer, Ale or Stout
12) Serve with Irish soda bread if possible and horse radish and / or Mustard

Margi Cintrano



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Old 02-11-2012, 03:34 PM   #2
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Margi, I'm not a fan of citrus flavors. Could I leave the clove studded orange out?

Also, why use a separate pot for boiling the potatoes? I like to make kielbasa and cabbage which includes potatoes that I've always cooked in the same pot.
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Old 02-11-2012, 04:32 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
Margi, I'm not a fan of citrus flavors. Could I leave the clove studded orange out?

Also, why use a separate pot for boiling the potatoes? I like to make kielbasa and cabbage which includes potatoes that I've always cooked in the same pot.
I am with you. Boiled dinners in my house have always been one pot meals. Company shows up, you toss a few more veggies in the pot. And I have never heard of an orange with a boiled dinner. I use the pot liquor for mashing the potatoes and other veggies with butter on your plate.
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Old 02-11-2012, 05:47 PM   #4
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I am with you. Boiled dinners in my house have always been one pot meals. Company shows up, you toss a few more veggies in the pot. And I have never heard of an orange with a boiled dinner. I use the pot liquor for mashing the potatoes and other veggies with butter on your plate.
I usually just mash the boiled potatoes with a fork, slather with butter and top with gravy made using the pot liquor.
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Old 02-11-2012, 05:54 PM   #5
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You've reminded me I have a brisket in the freezer that I was going to corn...that's a good project for this weekend. Should be ready in time for St. Patrick's Day.
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Old 02-11-2012, 06:33 PM   #6
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Seems like a very elaborate way to prepare this dish. 3 pots to separately cook different parts of the dish somehow seems out of character for what is in it's most basic form, a peasant dish.

I like the idea of a clove studded orange and I may try that at some point. However, seasonings aside, traditionally this is a one pot dish using very inexpensive ingredients to feed a family. The key is adding the ingredients at different times so that the whole dish becomes ready at the same time. The single pot method allows the mingling of flavors that makes this a classic stewed dinner.

Corned Beef and Cabbage House & Garden | January 1965


Yield: Serves 6, with meat left over for additional meals

Ingredients
5 pounds corned brisket of beef
6 peppercorns, or packaged pickling spices
3 carrots, peeled and quartered
3 onions, peeled and quartered
1 medium-sized green cabbage, quartered or cut in wedges
Melted butter (about 4 tablespoons)

Preparation

Place the corned beef in water to cover with the peppercorns or mixed pickling spices
Cover the pot or kettle, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 5 hours or until tender, skimming occasionally.
During the last hour, add the carrots and onions and cover again. During the last 15 minutes, add the cabbage.
Transfer meat and vegetables to a platter and brush the vegetables with the melted butter.

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Old 02-11-2012, 10:00 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Firstly, to eliminate the rotten egg aroma of cabbage, which is a Brassica genre vegetable along with Brussel Sprouts, Cauliflower and Broccoli; if overcooked, cabbage green or red emits sulfide, and to minimize this horrible aroma, here are some suggestions:

1) chop the cabbage in small wedges
2) make sure, water is boiling rapidly with salt, before dropping the wedges in
3) the more rapidly, you boil, the less chance of the rotten egg aromas
4) DO NOT COVER ( this prevents the possibilities of gas forming and prevents the stinky sulfide aromas.)
I'm sorry but that is just so totally wrong, or maybe I just know nothing about cooking. Cabbage (or any Brassica) doesn't emit any sulfide stench. Not unless maybe you cook the heck out of it but I have never done that. Or maybe you have some sensitivity to sulfides, or I have an immunity. I've never heard anybody saying cooking Brassica produces sulfide aromas. Or even if people say that I've never had that happen in my kitchen, and I eat a lot of Brassica.

Quote:
Originally Posted by forty_caliber View Post
Seems like a very elaborate way to prepare this dish. 3 pots to separately cook different parts of the dish somehow seems out of character for what is in it's most basic form, a peasant dish.
Same here. I've always cooked the basic recipe, in one pot. That's one of the attractions of corned beef and cabbage. The cook can spend his or her time visiting with guests instead of slaving in the kitchen.

And mustard? And horseradish? Yeah, of course! How could you serve this dish without mustard and horseradish?


It would be interesting to serve this dish with a different Brassica, maybe gailan... (kai-lan, Chinese kale)
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Old 02-11-2012, 11:35 PM   #8
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I think House and Garden forgot one item. The Potatoes. I also like turnips or rutebaga with my boiled dinner.
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Old 02-11-2012, 11:38 PM   #9
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It would be unthinkable to not have potatoes.
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Old 02-12-2012, 12:48 AM   #10
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margi, i'm guessing this is a little out of your field of expertise, but it still looks like a recipe i'd try once.

i'm seeing a more southwestern european influence with the orange and cloves. more provence than leinster.

interestingly enough, i was in dublin a few years ago and could not find corned beef and cabbage anywhere! then i tried in belfast, derry, westport, kilkenny, ballinamore, mullingar, and a few other towns. it became a joke between my irish friends and i to see if we could find it offered in a restaurant anywhere in the entire country! nada.
plainly, it's not an irish dish but rather irish american.

additionally, the spirit of this dish is a one pot boiled meal which was trying to imitate a common method of cooking in less affluent areas of ireland. the corned beef was an american substitute for a salt preserved ham which was what one might find in ireland many years ago.

not that any of this matters, though. we have boiled corned beef several times a year so i might be able to convince dw to give this one a go. i'll try to remember to post results if so.
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