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Old 10-19-2006, 03:19 PM   #11
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Gretchen, I agree. We have been quite happy with the prices and the quality of Costco meats.
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Old 10-19-2006, 03:58 PM   #12
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Me too, only complaint I have is the size of the package they have. Most of the time I have to freeze any unuse portion.
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Old 10-19-2006, 04:02 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by jc9394
Me too, only complaint I have is the size of the package they have. Most of the time I have to freeze any unuse portion.
I generally wait until I have the occasion to use the whole tenderloin because we don't really care as much for tenderloin fixed as a steak--prefer other cuts. So, it's tough because to get the price "break" you have to buy the whole piece, or pay the higher prices for a smaller roast or the individual steaks. A vacuum sealer is a nice appliance to preserve the good meats--and much much more, of course.
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Old 10-19-2006, 04:04 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Gretchen
--prefer other cuts.
Gretchen, which cut you prefer? I notice a lot of people like rib eye better than filet.
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Old 10-19-2006, 04:06 PM   #15
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As a warehouse store, Costco and the others deal in larger quantity packages. They began life servicing small businesses, not individual consumers.

I have no problem portioning a whole tenderloin, double wrapping and freezing it for later use. The savings are well worth it.
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Old 11-09-2006, 07:24 PM   #16
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first off, hi guys! long time no see!

going to ressurect a slightly older thread here... i thought of my buds at DC just yesterday when perusing offerings at our local korean market (**awesome** produce, and everything's cheaper than regular store). there's always an abundance of things i don't recognize when shopping around there, and this was one of them. they had packages labelled "filet mignon - tenderloin" that contained an entire tenderloin in a vacuum pack. no big fatty cap like someone else on this thread described, so i'm assuming peeled, but all had an obvious strip of "silverskin" along the top. they were crazy cheap, only a couple bucks a pound, but it's money wasted if i don't know what i'm getting into. so the questions:
1. pretend i'm a little slow here, how tasty a cut is this?
2. how do i pick a good one?
3. what's the best/right way to slice it once it's at my house?

thanks guys!!
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Old 11-09-2006, 08:33 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
As a warehouse store, Costco and the others deal in larger quantity packages. They began life servicing small businesses, not individual consumers.

I have no problem portioning a whole tenderloin, double wrapping and freezing it for later use. The savings are well worth it.
I would agree that cutting up a tenderloin is probably the easiest cut of any there is. I have a FoodSaver which is great for really sealing meats for freezing.
We just prefer other steaks (for more flavor) to filets so it doesn't work that way for us--we use it as a roast for large holiday dinners or parties. And the savings are a number of dollars/lb. as Andy says. As a roast to serve as many as 12, for example, for christmas, it is a pretty economical "splurge" meal with a lot of WOW.
But even our supermarkets sell whole tenderloins now, as well as steaks (at a higher price).
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Old 11-09-2006, 10:50 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fireweaver
...1. pretend I'm a little slow here, how tasty a cut is this?
2. how do i pick a good one?
3. what's the best/right way to slice it once it's at my house?

thanks guys!!
Good to see you again.

Fillet mignon/Tenderloin is considered the most elegant cut of beef for roasts and steaks. Château Briand is cut from the tenderloin. Other cuts have a more pronounced beef flavor but there is none as tender.

If you're getting a cryovac package of tenderloin, it's kind of difficult to do an in depth inspection. Pick any one. They all come with silver skin. It should be removed before portioning and cooking.

I choose to cut steaks from the thinner end, about 2" thick. I use the butt end for a roast. I also tie each steak with string to give it a nice round, uniform shape which promotes even cooking. I also tie the roast at 2" intervals.
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Old 08-20-2007, 07:29 AM   #19
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Is there a difference between a tenderloin from a Steer than from a Cow
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Old 08-20-2007, 01:43 PM   #20
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I think the only difference between a tenderloin from a cow vs. a steer would be size.

If a cryovac tenderloin has a "fat cap", that is easily removed by just running your fingers under the membrane, pulling it away from the main muscle mass, then cutting the membrane where it joines the meat. The silverskin is a separate membrane that has to be cut away with a very sharp knife. There is also a "chain" of muscle, fat, and connective tissue on one side of the tenderloin. At work, I cut this off, but save it for later use (we usually remove as much connective tissue as we can, and grind it to make some really good hamburgers).
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