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Old 04-07-2006, 11:30 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasgirl
Don't worry sattie. There are many many ways of cooking dishes. Some call it one name, others call it something totally different. It shouldn't be a debate on what is the "REAL" way of doing a dish. This site is for getting the different ways that people all over the world make things.
As for the many ways of cooking dishes... that is what I was marveling at.... just amazing the different recipes for goulash on this thread. All I have known is the way I was taught, now I have new ideas!!! Yipee! Thanks texasgirl!!!
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Old 04-07-2006, 11:35 AM   #22
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It's interesting to me how we in this country create dishes and then give them the name of another (exotic sounding), completely different dish.

The goulash dishes we ended up talking about are nothing like an old style Hungarian goulash. Americn Chop Suey is nothing like the Chinese dish. There are probably other dishes in this category.
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Old 04-07-2006, 12:24 PM   #23
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This site will give you an authentic version of Hungarian Goulash, or Gulyas. You will find that it is a substantially different dish than what has been presented here.

www.gumbopages.com/food/hungarian/gulyas.html

That being the case, I still like the Americanized version for a quick meal. It's truly yummy in its own right, and can be easily altered to fit your tastes. And as for adding kidney beans to goulash, if you also add some chili powder, then you have a dish that's called chilli-mac around here.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed fo the North
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Old 04-07-2006, 04:41 PM   #24
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GW, you've found a link that reinforces what I've always thought - generous lashings of paprika is what makes it goulash.

That's not to say that other variations aren't wonderful.

I don't necessarily care what these dishes are called as long as they taste good.
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Old 04-07-2006, 05:24 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
GW, you've found a link that reinforces what I've always thought - generous lashings of paprika is what makes it goulash.

That's not to say that other variations aren't wonderful.

I don't necessarily care what these dishes are called as long as they taste good.
I like the way you think. If it tastes good, you can call it muzzlewort for all I care. The quality is much more important than the arbitrary names we give to foods. But then again, using the correct names allow us to understand what each other is talking about. Hmm, which is more important to me, being able to communicate with others, or the food itself. Initially, it would be the food. But some communicative commonality (say that one three times fast) is essential for us to learn and share ideas.

communicative commonality, communicative commonality, communicative commonality! There. I said it three times, and quickly.

Seeeeya: Goodweed of the North
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Old 04-07-2006, 05:32 PM   #26
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Goodweed is today's winner of the alliteration prize.
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Old 04-08-2006, 07:35 AM   #27
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You can add this one to the Americanized list, if you wish.

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Gram's Boarding House Goulash

casserole-beef

2 tablespoons butter; melted
2 cloves garlic; minced
1 large onion; peeled & chopped
1 large green bell pepper; seeded & chopped
1 large yellow bell pepper; seeded & chopped
3/4 lb italian sausage, hot; browned & crumbled
3/4 lb italian sausage, sweet; browned & crumbled
1 1/2 lb ground beef; browned & crumbled
2 can (4 oz) mushroom stems and pieces; chopped
2 can (28 oz) italian tomatoes, peeled; coarsely chopped
2 can (6 oz) tomato paste
2 large fresh basil leaves
1-3 lb elbow macaroni; cooked al dente

Preparation:

In a large frying pan, melt butter, add garlic and onion and sauté until
onions are translucent. Add peppers, place a lid on frying pan and simmer
until peppers soften. Add the chopped mushrooms with juices and, removing
the frying pan lid, let cook down until most of the juices are gone. You
can use fresh mushrooms. Just add a bit of beef or chicken broth.
Meanwhile, coarsely chop the tomatoes into a large stock pot and add the
tomato paste, the basil leaves and the juice from one of the cans of
tomatoes (Hold the second can of juice in case the sauce needs to be
thinned). Then add the onion-pepper mixture and turn the heat under the
stock pot to medium low, stirring occasionally.
Remove casings from sausage and place in the large frying pan and brown,
breaking up with a spatula as it cooks. When the sausage is finished remove
with a slotted spoon and add to the tomato sauce in the stock pot. Drain
off all but 2 or 3 tablespoons of the sausage juices from the frying pan
and brown and crumble the ground beef in the same manner as the sausage.
When finished, pour the contents of the frying pan into the stock pot,
including the juices.
Let the stock pot simmer, stirring occasionally, for an hour or so to let
all the flavors blend. Cook the amount of pasta you want and mix into the
stock pot. I like mine a bit more hefty, so I usually use less pasta. Gram
used to use the pasta to "thin out" the goulash (ie. feed more people).

Note: I like Contadina for the tomatoes and paste. Bear with me on this.
I've been making it for years, but it has never been written down. I now
make it so I can freeze it into small portions for my lunches.

** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.73 **

enjoy!

wolfie
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Old 04-08-2006, 09:21 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
Goodweed is today's winner of the alliteration prize.
Thanks, I think. What's alliteration mean anyways?

Seeeeeeay; Goodweed of the North
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Old 04-08-2006, 10:04 AM   #29
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Alliteration (n.): repetition of an initial sound, usually a consonant or cluster in two or more words of a phrase

communicative commonality
Goodweed gives great greetings generously
marmalady made more meringues than mudbug
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Old 04-08-2006, 11:41 AM   #30
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I'm thinking about making one of the goulash recipes and substituting venison sausage. Will that work?
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