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Old 07-28-2007, 02:35 PM   #1
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Grass Fed Beef Top Round Roast

Folks,

I have a 3 lb. organic grass fed beef top round roast that I need some ideas for. I don't really want to prepare it as a roast per sey, but I would like some ideas of what else I could do with this cut of beef. Maybe the best way to prepare it is as a roast. If so, does any have any TNT recipes for grass fed beef?

I appreciate any tips/ideas for this.

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Old 07-28-2007, 03:00 PM   #2
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That should be a good roast. Prepare it as you would a regular roast beef so you can appreciate the difference in flavor.
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Old 07-28-2007, 03:30 PM   #3
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Miss Sattie

I think I am agreeing with Andy here. Pot-roast it, and keep it simple.
Grass fed beef will offer a somewhat different taste and texture. Enjoy that!
Monitor you cooking times/temperatures closely!

Enjoy!!!!
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Old 07-28-2007, 06:11 PM   #4
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I think a top round roast is good for an oven roast, not a pot roast.
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Old 07-28-2007, 07:42 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I think a top round roast is good for an oven roast, not a pot roast.
In dry heat be very diligent not to over cook.
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Old 07-28-2007, 07:57 PM   #6
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Once, I went to someone who told me his cows ate nothing but grass that was in the field. I was prepared for something good plus being healthy. Well, I fixed the same way any other meat and everyone could not eat due to the fact it was so tough. Later, I found out that when meat does not have the normal amount of fat it tends to be tough. I never went out there again. I did ask him why the roast turned out tough and he said I was first person who told him about this. I only wish I would have known maybe I could have baked it on lower temperature. What do you do when you have tough piece of beef? You don't know this ahead of time. My cousin gave me side of beef t hat they couldn't eat because of same reason. I gave it to someone else. I do feel bad about this experience but will not try something that someone else hasn't had good luck with. Cost too much.
I wish you good luck and please let us know how it turns out.
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Old 07-29-2007, 08:46 AM   #7
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It's likely to be dry and tough. I suggest adapting a venison recipe or making a goulash with a sour cream sauce. Slow low temperature cooking with moist heat would be advisable.

Could also be used to make chili or a sauerbraten. If you do the latter I'd suggest going with a recipe that includes ginger.
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Old 07-29-2007, 10:31 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill
It's likely to be dry and tough. I suggest adapting a venison recipe or making a goulash with a sour cream sauce. Slow low temperature cooking with moist heat would be advisable.

Could also be used to make chili or a sauerbraten. If you do the latter I'd suggest going with a recipe that includes ginger.
Thanks for advising about the meat. I only wish I had known this BEFORE the fact. Ours was surely tough and dry. I did not make very much gravey as there was hardly nothing o work with. Makes a big difference about the kind of meat you choose. I sure won't forget it.

Thanks for your advice justplainbill.
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Old 07-29-2007, 11:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by In the Kitchen
Thanks for advising about the meat. I only wish I had known this BEFORE the fact. Ours was surely tough and dry. I did not make very much gravey as there was hardly nothing o work with. Makes a big difference about the kind of meat you choose. I sure won't forget it.

Thanks for your advice justplainbill.
I wish I had seen this before the fact. I would have dry-roasted as Andy M. said, but would have larded with bacon. When it comes to meat, the flavor and texture is all about the fat. Look for the marbling; if its not there, you need either a slow cook, high liquid method or an additional way of infusing fat.
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Old 07-29-2007, 01:19 PM   #10
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I have been buying all my meats from this local ranch that raises all their livestock organically/naturally. I have not had any issues with any of the meats being dry or lacking fat/marbeling. As Andy stated, it does have a different texture than the meats you get at the grocery store. To me, and in particular with the roasting cuts, the meat is denser. I really enjoy the flavor and I like knowing that the livestock lived a somewhat normal life compared to what you may get at the gstore.

Andy, I'm with you, I'm thinking simply seasoned, roasted in the oven at a very low temp. On the website for where I purchase the meat, it suggests to cook it to a medium rare / medium and slice thinly.

Here is where I purchase from in case anyone is interested, it's pricey, but I like quality meat and I like knowing who's backyard it came from.

Burgundy Pasture Beef, Grandview, Texas, 817-866-2247

ITK... I agree, I think it is very helpful to know that the meat your in possession of is grass fed or not. It really does have to be handled differently and you also have to be prepared for the difference in the flavor.
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