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Old 06-30-2012, 11:52 AM   #1
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Hamburger, revisited

How many ways can you make a hamburger? I mean, besides stuffing it, or adding herbs and spices, and maybe a raw egg to the ground beef, hasn't everything been tried?

So, as usual, I had to try and tackle a simple meal and make it unique. Here's what I did, and it came out great.

I have a 6 inch Griswold, cast iron fying pan. I also had some grilled burges already made. The trick was in the presentation. I had no really good buns, and no time to make them. It was a couple days from pay-day, and so I was pretty much broke as well. So I thought about this for a bit and came up with the following:

Tater-burger, no fries required:

Peel and grate one russet baking potato per burger (this wa easy because there currently are only two in our household. Take one half of one grated potato and place it into the hot, pan (rendered pork fat was the fat of choice for this dish) and cook over medium heat, until crispy brown on both sides. Place on paper towels to drain off excess grease. Do the same with the other half of the potato. The six inch, diameter disks of crispy hash browns was then lightly covered on one side with catsup (this became the inside) and freshly sliced cucumber. The hot burger was set on top. The second disk was lightly spread with mayo. If I'd had fresh tomato, I would have added those slices as well. I used the hashbrown disks as the bun for the grilled burger. It was a match made in heaven. But to make this work, the hasbrown disks must be cripsy, and seasoned properly with a little salt. Spuds and a burger, who'd of thunk they'd pair so well. Anyone whose ever been at a picknick where burgers were cooked, that's who.

You can, of course put any topping you want on your burger.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 06-30-2012, 12:01 PM   #2
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Sounds great Chief. I just wish Stirling liked hashbrowns.
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Old 06-30-2012, 12:35 PM   #3
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Sorry to diverge, but the topic of hamburgers always makes me think of my "hamburger" story.

Back in about 1982, we were in a little restaurant in Nice. If you've been there, you know the kind. Small place of perhaps five tables, cook and waiter the only staff. Right across the road from the harbor, so the seafood was alive the evening before.

We were in not hurry and spent some time talking to the young waiter who wanted to exercise his English. We ordered and got coquille saint jacque, which of course we can never get at home fresh enough to be served with the coral.

Another American came in, the kind, spotable 300 meters away by his dress, that makes you cringe, following the theory that the foreigners that Europe seems to him to always be filled with will understand English, if only it is spoke slowly and loudly enough. This sent the waiter into je n' parle pas anglais mode, in order to at least get some entertaining confusions out of this boor.

Said boor then began trying to order a hamburger. He's sitting in a wonderful little seafood restaurant, in the land of masters of seafood preparation, in sight of the boats unloading the catch, and he wants a hamburger. The waiter, in French with much hand flapping, implies that such a dish is something new to him. But he eventually catches on and agrees that, yes, he now understands, and a hamburger is certainly to be had.

He goes off and returns with what "hamburger" was mostly taken to mean in France at the time, a ground beef patty, plain on a plate. I suspect the waiter had to dash out the back and beg the meat from another restaurant and talk the cook into making it.

After some stammering and sputtering, the boor ate the "hamburger," happily watched over by the smiling waiter who I don't think regretted at all the absence of a gratuity. We, however, got a rare bargain, excellent coquille saint jacque and a floorshow. We more than made up for the gratuity.
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Old 06-30-2012, 12:46 PM   #4
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ROFL!!!
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Old 06-30-2012, 01:02 PM   #5
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GLC

I have certainly seen that kind of tourist.

Tourist to spouse, "What city are we in?"
Spouse, "It's Tuesday, so it must be Copenhagen."

At the bank:

Teller, "What kind of currency would you like?
Tourist, "Green stuff, real money."

Overheard from 50 feet away, at a flea market in a small village (Heard by a friend. Imagine the Brooklyn accent.) "Harry. Harry! Ya gotta come over here and look at this. Harry!!!"
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Old 06-30-2012, 01:13 PM   #6
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Tax Lady and GLC,

Harry is running in his Nikes and tropical Hawaiian shirt and clashing bermudas, almost out of breath ... The cruise ship is about to pull anchor and depart ...

I can just imagine GLC´s tourist scene ...

GLC: thank you for posting the " realistic " ( I live in Europe )
and humorous story ...

Margi.
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Old 06-30-2012, 01:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
Sorry to diverge, but the topic of hamburgers always makes me think of my "hamburger" story.

Back in about 1982, we were in a little restaurant in Nice. If you've been there, you know the kind. Small place of perhaps five tables, cook and waiter the only staff. Right across the road from the harbor, so the seafood was alive the evening before.

We were in not hurry and spent some time talking to the young waiter who wanted to exercise his English. We ordered and got coquille saint jacque, which of course we can never get at home fresh enough to be served with the coral.

Another American came in, the kind, spotable 300 meters away by his dress, that makes you cringe, following the theory that the foreigners that Europe seems to him to always be filled with will understand English, if only it is spoke slowly and loudly enough. This sent the waiter into je n' parle pas anglais mode, in order to at least get some entertaining confusions out of this boor.

Said boor then began trying to order a hamburger. He's sitting in a wonderful little seafood restaurant, in the land of masters of seafood preparation, in sight of the boats unloading the catch, and he wants a hamburger. The waiter, in French with much hand flapping, implies that such a dish is something new to him. But he eventually catches on and agrees that, yes, he now understands, and a hamburger is certainly to be had.

He goes off and returns with what "hamburger" was mostly taken to mean in France at the time, a ground beef patty, plain on a plate. I suspect the waiter had to dash out the back and beg the meat from another restaurant and talk the cook into making it.

After some stammering and sputtering, the boor ate the "hamburger," happily watched over by the smiling waiter who I don't think regretted at all the absence of a gratuity. We, however, got a rare bargain, excellent coquille saint jacque and a floorshow. We more than made up for the gratuity.
Yes I am American. No, I am not a boor. I can't understand people who go to places they've never been, and not experience the wonders of the new land. I was on aricraft carriers and sailed around the Pacific rim, having the chance of a lifetime to meet and be with people from Australia, Korea, Japan, the Phillipines, and Hawaii. Most of my shipmates headed straight for the bar, and female company. I could see no use in that. Instead, I snorkled in the pristine waters of the Phillipino beaches, I swam in Hawaii, I ate the local foods in every country I had the opportunity to visit.

Of the places I got to experience, perhaps the most exotic, and dynamic food was in the Phillipines. I of course ate Pansit (sp), and lumpia. But I ate from a host of street vendors selling barbecued pork, or chicken, or even monkey on a stick (though I suspect themonkey was chicken after all). I had squid with ink on rice, and coconut pie made with slabs of fresh coconut, in a creamy sauce in a pie shell. I ate fambulous meats, cooked to perfection, and sauces with sauces made from the tropical fruit that was so plentiful. The food was amazing.

In Hong Kong, and in the Phillipines, it wasn't uncommon to see a man, or woman, with a great wok, and a huge propane torch on the sidewalk, cooking fresh stir fries. They tasted incredible, and talk about fast food. You watched them cook it right before you, season it, and put it on your plate, all in less than 5 minutes.

Every place I went, or lived, had incredible foods, and activities unique to that area, that enriched my life.

Your story would be like me going to one of San Diego's famous fish restaurants and ordering a burger. How lame is that! You know that when I went to Pike's Place Market in Seattle, I wasn't going there for a hot dog. That's where I was introduced to truffle salt, and some of the best, fresh seafood anywhere. The quality of ingredients I brought to my son's home to cook up made for meals I can't duplicate in my own home. But then again, I can get a host of fish that call the Great Lakes their home, as well as venison, bear, wild rabbit, grouse, squirrel, beaver, and a host of other wild game meats, plush truly free range chickens and turkeys, and beef, pork, and lamb from local growers that puts supermarket meat to shame. Fresh eggs from the small farms, where the chickens roam the fields and yards is at hand as well. And let's not even go into the wild blue berries of the U.P. There are none better on the planet. Come on up and test me on that one.

Every place you will every visit, or live in, has something that makes it special, and wonderful, if you take the time to discover it.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-30-2012, 01:41 PM   #8
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That would be my DH! Seems like just about every restaurant we go to, the first thing he looks at are the burgers! He'd eat that at every place if I let him!
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Old 06-30-2012, 09:20 PM   #9
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I understand the whole "when in Rome thing" but give the guy a break. Perhaps his taste buds had been overwhelmed by a couple of weeks of foreign food...well... foreign to him. Maybe he just wanted something familiar and comforting for one meal. Travel can be taxing if you aren't used to it and I'm quite sure that the owner of the restaurant found the boor's money just as spendable as anyone else's.
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Old 06-30-2012, 09:52 PM   #10
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Americans aren't said to be the rudest tourists. I think that honor goes to the Germans in surveys I've seen. But Americans often view other countries as a sort of Disneyland, intended for their amusement where the customer is always right. They think nothing wrong, for instance, with wearing shorts into a church, because it happens to be heavily visited by tourists. Europeans are far more accustomed to moving through other cultures.

The effect of this is that American tourists sometime feel no need to learn anything about where they are going. This leads to some unfortunate misperceptions. The American is accustomed to wandering through shops "just looking." They had no idea that "just looking" was not done eerywhere. So they are oblivious to the posting of an ENTRE LIBRE notice when a French shop invites lookers. Nor are they accustomed to greeting the owner or staff in a shop. So the tourist enters a non-ENTRE LIBRE shop, failing to acknowledge the shopkeeper, and when asked, announces, "Just looking." The shopkeeper's nose is now out of joint. The tourist then perceives French shopkeepers as rude. The shopkeeper perceives the American as deliberately rude.

And most Americans see few European tourists and so have little opportunity to see the other side and become aware of how difficulties can arise. Sadly, so few Europeans get beyond the east or west coast. Mostly, I think, our own fault for not promoting our country better.

Sorry for the hijack. This was supposed to be about hamburgers. I kind of feel like that if you're going for a hamburger, it ought to be a good old greasy burger with beef containing a reasonable amount of tasty fat and a bun with the cut side toasted on a buttered grill. The epitome, in my mind, is always Dirty Martin's place across from the University of Texas Campus in Austin, where they've been doing them like that since 1926. I don't eat many hamburgers, maybe two a year, at most.

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ground beef, potato, recipe

Hamburger, revisited How many ways can you make a hamburger? I mean, besides stuffing it, or adding herbs and spices, and maybe a raw egg to the ground beef, hasn't everything been tried? So, as usual, I had to try and tackle a simple meal and make it unique. Here's what I did, and it came out great. I have a 6 inch Griswold, cast iron fying pan. I also had some grilled burges already made. The trick was in the presentation. I had no really good buns, and no time to make them. It was a couple days from pay-day, and so I was pretty much broke as well. So I thought about this for a bit and came up with the following: Tater-burger, no fries required: Peel and grate one russet baking potato per burger (this wa easy because there currently are only two in our household. Take one half of one grated potato and place it into the hot, pan (rendered pork fat was the fat of choice for this dish) and cook over medium heat, until crispy brown on both sides. Place on paper towels to drain off excess grease. Do the same with the other half of the potato. The six inch, diameter disks of crispy hash browns was then lightly covered on one side with catsup (this became the inside) and freshly sliced cucumber. The hot burger was set on top. The second disk was lightly spread with mayo. If I'd had fresh tomato, I would have added those slices as well. I used the hashbrown disks as the bun for the grilled burger. It was a match made in heaven. But to make this work, the hasbrown disks must be cripsy, and seasoned properly with a little salt. Spuds and a burger, who'd of thunk they'd pair so well. Anyone whose ever been at a picknick where burgers were cooked, that's who.:lol: You can, of course put any topping you want on your burger. Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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