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Old 10-20-2006, 02:19 PM   #1
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Help! Bottom rump roast

Every time I use this cut of beef, it comes out dry and tough. I am roasting it in a metal pan at 350 degrees covered with foil. I added some beef broth to it as well because this cut of beef does not have alot of fat. It never comes out for tender. It only took two hours to roast, and I figured it would be more like four hours.

What is my mistake? I dont have a slow cooker so thats not an option. How can I get this cut of beef tender and moist? Is the temperature too high? Should I keep it uncovered? Should I not even use this cut of beef?

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Old 10-20-2006, 02:24 PM   #2
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A bottom round is not an oven roast. IMO it'll never come out tender cooked that way.

It needs to be braised like a pot roast. You don't need a slow cooker, just a heavy pot with a tight fitting lid. Cooked correctly, it is very tender and flavorful.

Cook it low and slow in the oven with liquid. There are lots of pot roast recipes on DC, I am sure you'll find one that appeals to you.
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Old 10-20-2006, 02:27 PM   #3
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Amber, IMO rump roast is only good for pot roast type meals. If you are looking for tender roast beef then you need to splurge on either standing rib or prime rib.

BUT, lets see what we can do with what you have. Do you have a heavy dutch oven or something that can go in the oven? If so, try putting down some veggies, potatoes, carrots, onions, parsnip etc on the bottom, sear your meat and set it on top of the veggies. Then pour some liquid (beef broth, red wine mix is nice) over the veggies, but don't let it cover the meat. Sometimes I use a little rack to keep the meat higher. Then cover and put in the oven at 250 or so for a loooong time. If you do it slowly it will be nice and tender and all the stuff in the bottom will help flavour the meat.
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Old 10-20-2006, 02:28 PM   #4
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jenny, great minds!
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Old 10-20-2006, 03:02 PM   #5
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A little fat is not a bad thing - some fat adds moisture. Cook at a low temp - about 350 - low and slow - preheat the oven - slice the meat against the grain. Also let it rest after you remove it from the oven. Try poking some holes in the roast and basting with juices.
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Old 10-20-2006, 03:12 PM   #6
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I'm gonna add the veggies as suggested, and then let it slowwwww cook for as long as it takes to get this meat fork tender. Even though the package says it's a bottom rump oven roast, I'll have to treat it like a pot roast. Thanks everyone!
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Old 10-20-2006, 03:13 PM   #7
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What everyone else has said--just too lean and too tough for a dry roast. That said, I have had it served to me and it has been sort of edible, but the secret was to cook it rare and slice VERY thin across the grain. Done that way it could also make some passable French dip sandwiches with some au jus.

One way I have very successfully cooked rump roast is as a sandwich filling. Funny sounding recipe but it does work. In a crock pot put a jar of hot 'n sweet pepper rings. Put your roast on top. Cover tightly and cook for 8 hours on low. Shred the meat and combine with the juices.
Put on good pully hoagie buns, top with a slice of muenster, provolone or some such kind of cheese. Wrap in foil and warm in oven until the cheese melts.
For cooking as a pot roast low and slow, I find 300* to be a pretty good temp. Above that it will roast and the liquid will boil too vigorously.
It would also make a good beef BBQ and you might still be able to do this with what you have. Put a layer of onions in the crockpot, put the roast on top, pour in a can of beer and a 12oz. bottle of BBQ sauce. Cook for 8 hours on low (if you are starting with uncooked roast). Maybe 4 hours for the already cooked meat--not sure, since I haven't ever done that but seems like it might work.
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Old 10-20-2006, 04:58 PM   #8
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I've cooked this roast a few times, and yes, it DOES have to be slow cooked, (braised) as suggested, or it won't come out right.

Brown it first on all sides with a little hot oil in a heavy cast iron kettle. Add a chopped or sliced onion, a few celery stocks and some carrots for aromatic veggies, some garlic, seasonings, a boquet garnie and some water halfway up the roast.

Cover and let it slow cook for several hours over a very low flame. You can also thicken the juice afterwards if you like for a luscious brown gravy. It should be moist and fork tender throughout.

Add some frozen stew veggies to the gravy during the last half hour if desired, and let them cook through.


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Old 10-20-2006, 05:06 PM   #9
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Amber, can't wait to hear how it turned out. And not to rain on Corey, but don't let the liquid come up on the meat. It will disintegrate if you try to slice it against the grain that way. If you keep it above the liquid and just do it really slow it will be sliceable.

Corey, your recipe sounds delicious. I'm sorry to sound rude and disagree with you about the liquid bit, I've just had very poor results when I've done it that way. Could be just me though!
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Old 10-20-2006, 05:40 PM   #10
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No, not to the top of the roast. Nor should you even consider 3/4 the way up! You just want to tame the beast with as little water as possible, but start with the water at least 1/4 to 1/3 the way up the meat.

Braising calls for as little water or other liquid as possible - but just enough to keep the meat moist and the liquid at a very suttle and gentle simmer.

And since the meat has a tough grain anyway, when done, it should hold its shape enough to be able to slice without falling apart. As long as you try to slice the meat ACROSS the grain.

Let the liquid settle enough so that the fat rises to the top of the liquid. You can then skim this off and use it to make a roux for a very delectable brown gravy.


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