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Old 09-17-2012, 09:13 AM   #21
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I too do my pot roast on top of the stove. I think you have better control over it. And I have a glass cover for my pot so I can see what it is doing. I do put my veggies in during the last 45 minutes. Turnip and carrots go in first. Potaotes last. I also add a packet of onion soup mix to mine. It gives the gravy a great flavor along with the fond from browning the meat.
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Old 09-18-2012, 12:08 AM   #22
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My favorite prep of a pot roast is stove top browned and braised over a mirepoix. I generally add a little stock and/or tomato paste. Vegetables go in with about a half hour to go. The usual pepper, garlic, and spices.
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Old 09-18-2012, 07:05 AM   #23
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I brown the meat (usually its about 2-3 lbs ) on top of stove the into oven with potatoes, carrots, onions, celery, (sometimes parnips) salt pepper, bay leave, lil roswmary, 1-2 garlic cloves minced up and beef ( i use foil and then put the cover on top of that then last 1/2 to 45 min uncover to finish cooking and veggies brown up a lil. then remove meat and veggies and make a pan gravy to go with.
total cooking approx 2-2 1/2 hrs depending on size of meat.

I have always had a tender beef and very flavorful veggies and no leftovers - and it is requested often.

Ill do the same with chicken - we call it chicken pot roast
chicken, potatoes, onions, chix broth celery s & p bay leaf a lemon or 2
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Old 09-18-2012, 07:22 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by letscook View Post
I brown the meat (usually its about 2-3 lbs ) on top of stove the into oven with potatoes, carrots, onions, celery, (sometimes parnips) salt pepper, bay leave, lil roswmary, 1-2 garlic cloves minced up and beef ( i use foil and then put the cover on top of that then last 1/2 to 45 min uncover to finish cooking and veggies brown up a lil. then remove meat and veggies and make a pan gravy to go with.
total cooking approx 2-2 1/2 hrs depending on size of meat.

I have always had a tender beef and very flavorful veggies and no leftovers - and it is requested often.

Ill do the same with chicken - we call it chicken pot roast
chicken, potatoes, onions, chix broth celery s & p bay leaf a lemon or 2
Don't forget pork works just as well as beef/chicken. Did some bone in country style ribs last night. Stove top, pot roast style and used the braising liquid to make gravy.
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Old 09-18-2012, 04:32 PM   #25
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Don't boil beef

You don't want to boil beef. Cook's Illustrated had a great article about this a few years ago. Either simmer it around 190 degrees or pressure cook it at 15 psi (250 degrees). Boiling at 212 degrees is the worst thing- makes it tough. It has something to do with how the connective tissues in beef react to heat. To do the low heat thing, put it in a dutch oven and put the dutch oven in stove oven at around 200 degrees for about 5 hours.
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Old 09-18-2012, 07:10 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Stock Pot View Post
You don't want to boil beef. Cook's Illustrated had a great article about this a few years ago. Either simmer it around 190 degrees or pressure cook it at 15 psi (250 degrees). Boiling at 212 degrees is the worst thing- makes it tough. It has something to do with how the connective tissues in beef react to heat. To do the low heat thing, put it in a dutch oven and put the dutch oven in stove oven at around 200 degrees for about 5 hours.
You are right. But with a very low simmer on top of the stove, you can not only get a very tender cut of meat in less time, but save on energy also. The heating elements (gas or electric) in the oven are much larger than the burners on top of the stove. And the heat is directed right to the pan, not all around it. Also using a pressure cooker, saves even more. You can have a complete tender meal in one hour with a pressure cooker. It doesn't have to be electric or plug in. I cooked many meals for Sunday dinner with my Presto pressure cooker on top of the stove. And it was done with a very low, low gas flame.

Even though I don't pay for my utilities today, I am always mindful of the cost. Not only for myself, but for others. While raising a family, I was always looking for quick meals to go from the stove in the shortest time while using the lest amount of energy. Saving on my food bill I also was mindful of saving on my utility bills.
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Old 09-18-2012, 08:11 PM   #27
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Right. Either way. I kind of like stovetop myself because you can taste it along the way.
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Old 09-18-2012, 08:50 PM   #28
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Sounds like you have been checking the pot fairly frequently. Every time you lift the lid, you are losing temperature in the pot. I would trust the crock pot to do it's job, and leave it for the required time. I often lay a sheet of foil over the pot and then put the lid on.
Lyndalou, you are totally correct on this, and I too have been guilty as charged.
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Old 09-18-2012, 09:21 PM   #29
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Your right craigc, don't know why i forgot that to, I do pork the same way and its delious. I also like to do it with the addition of saurkraut.
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Old 09-18-2012, 09:24 PM   #30
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Don't forget pork works just as well as beef/chicken. Did some bone in country style ribs last night. Stove top, pot roast style and used the braising liquid to make gravy.
I have some bone in country style ribs I need to use, maybe I should make it this way.
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