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Old 12-08-2018, 04:00 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by skyy38 View Post
Yep, preferences and methods!

IMHO, to me though, "reverse sear' is like pitching your tent AFTER the rain has come down.

Yeah, go low for the interior and THEN sizzle that suckers exterior at the end.

One problem though- when you sear at the END of the roasting cycle, you're just heating up the INTERIOR that much more because it had been heating up slowly, but now, it is influenced by the outside reverse sear temperature, which means the interior temperature of the roast will go up several degrees than you had originally intended.


Long story short: Your medium rare will turn into medium well, because of "reverse sear".

Pitch that tent BEFORE it rains...….
If you were familiar with the method you would know that isn't true.
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Old 12-08-2018, 09:17 AM   #22
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...Long story short: Your medium rare will turn into medium well, because of "reverse sear".

Pitch that tent BEFORE it rains...….
If you had actually used the reverse sear method, you would have learned that isn't what happens. The point of letting it rest after cooking is to prevent further cooking during the sear.
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Old 12-08-2018, 12:01 PM   #23
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If you had actually used the reverse sear method, you would have learned that isn't what happens. The point of letting it rest after cooking is to prevent further cooking during the sear.
Egg-zactly. The reverse sear method works perfectly. Kenji López-Alt of Serious Eats described the science and I've been making it this way for the last three years.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/12/...prime-rib.htmlClick image for larger version

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Old 12-08-2018, 04:11 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Egg-zactly. The reverse sear method works perfectly. Kenji López-Alt of Serious Eats described the science and I've been making it this way for the last three years.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/12/...prime-rib.htmlAttachment 32484
You beat me to it..


Of all the rib roasts I've cooked over the years, this is the best method I have found..



Works as well on the smaller 1 rib (call it a steak) I make for Jeannie and myself, throughout the year..



Ross
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Old 12-08-2018, 05:49 PM   #25
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I don't grill, but I certainly enjoy the results of a reverse sear cook. I prefer beef cooked that way over any other and I like my beef on the rare side of medium rare.

Skyy38, don't knock something until you've tried it. I was skeptical too, but it turned out to be my favorite way CraigC cooks steaks, i.e. rib eyes, aka prime rib.
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Old 12-08-2018, 11:41 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
The people who are suggesting reverse sear in this thread have tried it. They know exactly how it turns out.
Exactly?

Each and every time? I don't think so.


Since your hunk of whatever is on a low temperature and beef and turkey cook from the outside, IN, it's a matter of heat conduction.

Ever heat a cup of instant coffee in a microwave using cold water.

2 minutes later, you have a perfectly heated cup of coffee.

Ever heat a cup of even just lukewarm coffee in a microwave?

2 minutes later, that coffee is practically boiling, because the microwave
"latched on" to the lukewarm heat and increased it.

Going back to the meat and turkey, which have been roasted on low until they are close to the ideal internal temperature, and then the oven is turned up to reverse sear it, heat conduction "latches on" that low internal temperature and increases it to where you don't want it to be, which is going to mess with the final internal temperature.

The actual trouble with reverse sear is that most people don't know WHEN to engage the searing temperature.
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Old 12-09-2018, 12:13 AM   #27
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If they check their Prime rib at 125 DF Internal and then start to reverse sear, heat conduction latches on to the "perfect" internal temperature and increases it through the searing process.

Remember that lukewarm cup of coffee that wound up boiling?

Also, after the reverse sear and you take your Prime Rib out of the oven, it continues to cook, even as it's cooling down, on the countertop.

The damage has already been done though, with the reverse sear, because it just turned 125 into 135 and then 135 gets turned into 140 or even higher, while resting, which puts your Prime Rib in medium well territory, at LEAST!!!


And Medium Well for Prime Rib, is about as good as the bottom of your shoes, after you've stepped into a pile of crap.


Oh btw, for those of you who wish you had a "convection oven"-guess what?

You ALREADY have a convection oven! You just don't know it!
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Old 12-09-2018, 12:18 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by skyy38 View Post
Exactly?
Yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skyy38 View Post
Each and every time?
Yup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skyy38 View Post
I don't think so.
Have you ever tried it?

Did you read the article I posted?

Like I said, I've done this several times and it works *perfectly.* Every time.
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:10 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skyy38 View Post
...Going back to the meat and turkey, which have been roasted on low until they are close to the ideal internal temperature, and then the oven is turned up to reverse sear it, heat conduction "latches on" that low internal temperature and increases it to where you don't want it to be, which is going to mess with the final internal temperature.

The actual trouble with reverse sear is that most people don't know WHEN to engage the searing temperature.
From reading this part of your post, it seems like you did not read the linked article that has been posted - twice. Otherwise, you would have seen this part:
Start your prime rib in a very low-temperature oven (200 to 275°F), let it reach about 125°F for medium rare, remove it and let it rest while you crank the oven up to its maximum setting, then set the beef back inside for just a few minutes to crisp up the exterior. There isn't a roast in the oven while you increase the temperature up to maximum, so there is nothing for the heat to "latch on" to. The roast in returned to that super-hot oven (in the case of my range, 550 degrees) just long enough to crisp the outside. If anything, the roast is in the oven just long enough for it to return to 125 degrees after losing a few while resting on your counter. Therefore, you "engage the searing temperature" when the empty oven reaches its maximum heat. Think of it as the sun coming out for a short time so that your roast can leave your tent between reaching it's 125 degree internal temperature and then being returned to that 550 degree oven for about five or ten minutes to get all crispy.
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:10 AM   #30
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The actual trouble with reverse sear is that most people don't know WHEN to engage the searing temperature.
The meat is taken to an internal temperature 10F to 15F below the desired finished temperature and rested while the temperature is increased to searing temperature. In my case I use a BGE and the searing temperature is 650F for 30 seconds, turn, 30 seconds, flip, 30 seconds, turn, 30 seconds, pull and rest.

Seems you want to argue with us about a TNT method, which is a waste of time.
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