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Old 06-26-2007, 05:27 PM   #1
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ISO Advice on Cooking Brisket

hey guys...got a 2lb piece of briskett. was told its very good if you put it in a pan, with button shrroms, potatos, beef/onion powderd soup mix, and cover it 3/4 of the way with red wine and some water.

easy enough...but i forgot to ask what temp and time length.

any ideas? i was thinkin low and slow...maybe 250 for 3 hours??

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Old 06-26-2007, 05:30 PM   #2
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sear that puppy first. then add all your nice others. Check it occasionally for fall-apartness.

sorry to be so technical, but yes low and slow is the way to go.
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Old 06-26-2007, 05:44 PM   #3
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You've described a braise and that's just what you need for a brisket.

Cook it covered on the stove top at a simmer for around three hours. In the oven at 300F-350F for the same time. It's done when a fork goes in with little resistance.
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Old 06-26-2007, 05:54 PM   #4
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thanks guys!! also..there is a 2-3 mm layer of fat on once side...should i leave that?

i figured i would, and do it fat side up so it melts in ala boston butt... is that correct?
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Old 06-26-2007, 05:55 PM   #5
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Right on......
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Old 06-26-2007, 08:37 PM   #6
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Mugsy27 - I LoL'd with Andy M.'s response.

I always leave the fat on when cooking (but on top). I will sometimes also cool off the result once cooked (in fridge or freezer) to have the fat become more solid and scoop it away.

If in a rush, you can also use "special strainer/measure cup" that has the pour spout at the bottom (fat rises so you can have a quicker seperation of broth vs. fat availible back into the meal prep). These measure cups are normally easy to find.

For something with a "fat cap" I normally trim to around 1/3 inch or less, but make sure the resulting fat is not part of the meal. The benefits of leaving some of the fat in the cooking process is added flavor , especially when you have root vegitables to absorb the flavor, and the resistance to the meat drying.

Of course, that is just my personal opinion.

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