"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-01-2016, 09:55 AM   #21
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
OK I have to chime in here, as Corned Beef, and Corned beef hash, were kind of central to my survival as a graduate student.

So there is, obviously, a difference between corned beef and corned beef hash. The first is just the meat, the second is meat plus some potatoes, usually spiced. Dinty More, Mary Kitchen, and Hormel there are a number of brands.

I like corned beef hash for breakfast. Make a pancake of it, with a hole in the middle, and put an egg or two in.

RB thanks for your defense of this food. we all have our comfort foods, and our convenience foods.

I'm at heart a New England guy, I spend a couple years out in Oklahoma, and learned a little bit about Southern cooking. One of the things I lost was my preconceptions, learned more about SPAM than I like, but good info alltogether. Also cooking possum.

We all sometimes have some time with less money than we want. I think sharing recipes and strategies to deal with that is important. I do know I would have starved to death in grad school if I couldn't get a flat of Hornel Corned Beef Hash. It was my major protein, at a time I was living on a $30 month food budget.

There are many strategies to make corned beef hash taste good. I promise.

TBS
__________________

__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 11:25 AM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 20,659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
Seems to me that some people find the time to comment on other posters taking the time to comment on related but not actually on topic subjects. Which o course is not on topic.

Looking through the thread, about half the comments are related to the topic but not actually on topic. I find this fairly typical of forums everywhere.

I don't know what the problem is.
The problem is that we all have something to share. And of course going off subject is the norm for this forum.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 11:33 AM   #23
Head Chef
 
CakePoet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Wexio
Posts: 1,324
adrianxw: Just tip that has nothing to do with canned corn beef ( I can find this is several Swedish store.) If you can get to Malmö or Göteborg Sweden, there is The English shop ( google it) and you might more stuff you love.
__________________
For the love of Cheese!
CakePoet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 11:41 AM   #24
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
I'm at heart a New England guy, I spend a couple years out in Oklahoma, and learned a little bit about Southern cooking. One of the things I lost was my preconceptions, learned more about SPAM than I like, but good info alltogether. Also cooking possum.TBS
Oklahoma seems an odd place to learn Southern cooking. Transplants maybe? I never knew Spam was widely used in the cuisine.
__________________
If you're gonna make a Key Lime pie, you have to use real Key Limes!
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 11:46 AM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 20,659
Now, back on topic.

My first husband loved canned corn beef. During the war, if it wasn't canned corn beef, it was Spam. Both plentifully supplied by the American soldiers. So I started buying it for him. You open the can with a key and have to be very careful that it doesn't spring back on you. (Lesson learned) He would heat the slices up in a sauté pan and have it with eggs.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 01:44 PM   #26
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Oklahoma seems an odd place to learn Southern cooking. Transplants maybe? I never knew Spam was widely used in the cuisine.
Tulsa is known for its aviation. Air Force seems to like spam, spam sandwiches, spam casseroles.

yup, I was in Tulsa. Lets call it Ozark cooking? You are right it isn't strictly southern cuisine. Actually picked up some cooking tricks from the Tribes.
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 01:50 PM   #27
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Now, back on topic.

My first husband loved canned corn beef. During the war, if it wasn't canned corn beef, it was Spam. Both plentifully supplied by the American soldiers. So I started buying it for him. You open the can with a key and have to be very careful that it doesn't spring back on you. (Lesson learned) He would heat the slices up in a sauté pan and have it with eggs.
Corned beef slices with eggs, and toast? Both that or spam. My granddad was a WWII veteran, he would very carefully make that every morning.
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 08:58 PM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 20,659
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
Tulsa is known for its aviation. Air Force seems to like spam, spam sandwiches, spam casseroles.

yup, I was in Tulsa. Lets call it Ozark cooking? You are right it isn't strictly southern cuisine. Actually picked up some cooking tricks from the Tribes.


Such as? I am part Native American and am entitled to the settlement checks tribal members receive every month. I never applied because the only thing I have ever done that could be considered Native American was to open a can of corn.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 10:03 PM   #29
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 7,472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
[/B]

Such as? I am part Native American and am entitled to the settlement checks tribal members receive every month. I never applied because the only thing I have ever done that could be considered Native American was to open a can of corn.
Sorry Addie...but do you ever review what you post before you hit submit?
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 10:25 PM   #30
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 7,472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I have not used canned corned beef in years because the price has increased to the point where it is not a good value for me.

I used to use the canned corned beef to make hash. A can or corned beef, an equal amount of boiled potatoes, a little minced onion and or green bell pepper, salt and pepper to taste, bacon grease, fry low and slow until the bottom develops a crust, turn with a spatula and mash down continue frying until a new bottom crust is formed, serve with ketchup and an egg or two.

For sandwiches. Mash the corned beef, add minced onion, sweet pickle relish, enough mayonnaise to bind the mixture together. This mixture can be eaten on a cold roll or stuff the roll, add a slice of cheese, wrap in aluminum foil and place in a hot oven until the cheese has a chance to melt. You could also do it on bread in a CI pan, similar to a tuna melt.

A skillet meal with ribbons of fresh cabbage, chunks of canned corned beef. Add a little water to the skillet, cover and steam until the cabbage is tender, remove lid and cook until the water has evaporated and the mixture starts to fry. You can also do this with a can of drained sauerkraut.

Put chunks of canned corned beef in a cream sauce with some frozen peas and cook until the meat and peas are heated through, serve over boiled or baked potatoes.

Oh, back to the original question. I would heat it at 350-375F for 30 - 40 minutes.
This. ^ Adding a couple of cans to my shopping list to keep on hand in the pantry.
__________________

__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
beef, corn, corned beef

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.