"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-12-2007, 10:01 AM   #1
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Question ISO Beef Stock Help

I started a beef stock last night using about eight pounds of beef shanks, split and cut into two inch pieces, and about four pounds of split beef feet. This is my first time using the feet. After slowly simmering for about 14 hours I was amazed to find quite a lot of gelatinous material still attached. I am tempted to start another batch using the same bones and then combining and reducing the two batches. I've seen this subject discussed before, and I think there is a French word for the process that roughly translates to reboil the bones. I can't remember the word and googling reboil bones doesn't help. Any experience with this out there?

__________________

__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2007, 08:26 PM   #2
Traveling Welcome Wagon
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere, US
Posts: 15,919
I have never tried this, but it is an interesting idea. Hopefully someone will come along soon with some tried and true advice.

Barbara
__________________

__________________
Barbara L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2007, 08:27 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,159
Did you brown the bones in the oven before you began to cook the stock, skillet? I always do that. It gives the stock a great flavor.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2007, 09:17 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
Did you brown the bones in the oven before you began to cook the stock, skillet? I always do that. It gives the stock a great flavor.
Yep. About 45 minutes at 425F. This was more bones than I'm used to and could have gone longer.
__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2007, 09:59 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
I think the term you're looking for is "remoulliage", or something similar.

14 hours is an awfully short time for beef stock. I usually cook mine for between 24 and 36 hours, usually 36. Just cook the stock until all the collagen (cartiliage and other connective tissues) have broken down and dissolved into the stock. Keep in mind that "Elastin" - based connective tissues WILL NOT break down. Off the top of my head, the only connective tissue made from elastin is the backstrap, but I know there's one more.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2007, 10:52 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK
I think the term you're looking for is "remoulliage", or something similar.

14 hours is an awfully short time for beef stock. I usually cook mine for between 24 and 36 hours, usually 36. Just cook the stock until all the collagen (cartiliage and other connective tissues) have broken down and dissolved into the stock. Keep in mind that "Elastin" - based connective tissues WILL NOT break down. Off the top of my head, the only connective tissue made from elastin is the backstrap, but I know there's one more.
Remouillage
Thanks Allen! I put the bones in the ice box and maybe tomorrow morning I will start another batch. I have learned from previous experiments that you can thicken water until the bones turn to powder. You always get a thick viscous liquid but eventually, if it has any flavor at all, it's a bad one.l
__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2007, 05:35 AM   #7
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK
Keep in mind that "Elastin" - based connective tissues WILL NOT break down. Off the top of my head, the only connective tissue made from elastin is the backstrap, but I know there's one more.
Well I had to look up backstrap and elastin. Is elastin what that silverskin stuff on a loin or gizzard is made of?
__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2007, 09:16 AM   #8
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Straits of Juan de Fuca
Posts: 893
I'd put the same batch right back on the stove and cook (simmer) longer!!
__________________
~~~~~~~~~~
an old cook, still learning new tricks!
cjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2007, 09:22 AM   #9
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
Well I had to look up backstrap and elastin. Is elastin what that silverskin stuff on a loin or gizzard is made of?
I'll have to pull out my textbook and check. First, I have to find my textbook. Hopefully later today; I have the day off.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2007, 09:46 AM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjs
I'd put the same batch right back on the stove and cook (simmer) longer!!
Me too. I've only hear of using fresh bones for stocks.
__________________

__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.