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Old 07-08-2008, 04:15 PM   #1
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ISO great Beef Brisket!

DH and I are watching Diners, Drive-ins and Dives. All BBQ.
IT"S KILLIN' ME!!!

We grilled an awesome turkey on the 4th... now we want to attempt a brisket. Don't have a smoker, would like to use our Weber charcoal grill.
Can anyone help?

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Old 07-08-2008, 04:42 PM   #2
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1. Use a rub. It can be anything from salt, pepper, and garlic powder to prepackaged, or make up your own with spices you like. Apply the rub the day before you plan to cook the brisket.

2. Use indirect heat (obviously), with a temperature of 225 degrees.

3. Use whatever type of wood you prefer. I like hickory or oak for brisket.

4. Use a probe thermometer. You're going for an internal temp of 190 degrees, so time isn't as important as temperature.

5. Once you reach 190 degrees, pull the brisket, wrap it very well in foil, then wrap in a large towel and place in an empty ice chest with the lid closed for 1 to 2 hours.

6. Unwrap the brisket and slice against the grain. It should be juicy and tender.

Good luck!
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Old 07-08-2008, 04:52 PM   #3
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Check out this post. It's about ribs but the technique is universal.
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Old 07-08-2008, 05:34 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Check out this post. It's about ribs but the technique is universal.
Andy, that is excellent advice except for one thing. I would never apply olive or any other type of oil to my ribs before putting on the rub. If anything, I'd use plain, yellow mustard. You don't taste the mustard on the finished product and it helps create a nice crust with the rub.

Just sayin.
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Old 07-08-2008, 05:37 PM   #5
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I hear you. I posted the link for the technique of using the Weber for smoking so it could be adapted for Suzie's brisket.

Basically, the link I posted just goes into some detail on how to do what you suggested.
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Old 07-08-2008, 06:27 PM   #6
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Suzi, cooking a brisket (you probably want to go with a flat, not a whole brisket) entirely on the kettle will require some significant babysitting of your cooker for a lonnnng time.

Brisket needs long, low cooking time and long and low are challenging on a kettle. To keep the temp low, you need just a small pile of briquetts, and when they burn up, you will need to replace them with another small pile, which will mean opening up the lid a lot, losing heat.

I'm thinking you might want to start it on the kettle, hit it with smoke for a few hours, then wrap it in foil, with some really good liquid (I have a recipe) and finish it off in a 225 for the remaining hours.

What do you think?

Lee
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Old 07-08-2008, 06:37 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QSis View Post
...I'm thinking you might want to start it on the kettle, hit it with smoke for a few hours, then wrap it in foil, with some really good liquid (I have a recipe) and finish it off in a 225 for the remaining hours.

What do you think?

Lee

Lee, does it make a difference if you smoke first then oven bake or oven bake then smoke?
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Old 07-08-2008, 06:48 PM   #8
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Yes, it does make a difference, Andy. A raw piece of meat will take the smoke better than one that's partially cooked or cooked.

Although, I DO hit cooked hams and bologna chubs with smoke for an hour or two, and they taste great.

Lee
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Old 07-08-2008, 06:49 PM   #9
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Thanks. Good to know.
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:36 PM   #10
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Lee I am willing to go thru a few briskets to find the perfect one!
I'll try anything once!
Thank you everyone.
My step-FIL is a welder by trade. I think we have him talked into building a smoker.... as he drools over good food as bad as we do!!
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