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Old 06-08-2007, 02:10 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb L.
Kadesma, could you post how you make your prime rib? I make one once a year at New Years, want to see if it is much difference than I do. Thanks ! Barb
Barb,
will PM you how I do mine..Am taking Carson for new shoes right now and he is so eager to go I just have to go..
kadesma
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Old 06-08-2007, 02:29 PM   #12
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great Thanks!
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Old 06-09-2007, 11:36 AM   #13
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I think I"m going to buy a 7lb roast. 6-8 people are coming so I'm thinking that should be enough with 1lb per person and one guest is a little girl who is only 6 years old.

I was wondering, if I took it out at 135 degrees and let it sit for 10-15 minutes, what degree do you think it will go up too? I just don't want this turning into a medium well or well done roast.

Thanks
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Old 06-09-2007, 12:17 PM   #14
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Around 145F to 150F, which I think is perfect for a beef toast.

When I cook a beef roast, I preheat the oven to as high as it goes, which in my case is 550F. I cook the roast at 550F for 30 minuters, then reduce the temperature to 350F and, although I use a meat thermometer, I expect the remaining cooking time to be approximately 20 minutes per pound, and schedule my side dish preparation accordingly.
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Old 06-09-2007, 12:21 PM   #15
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but.....The chart says:


Medium Well 146 - 150 F

I thought Roast Beef was better at least Medium or even less for some people. I don't like it too rare myself.




I think I'm going to follow some advise I found on cooking it on low "225" degrees. As you know there are many schools for cooking prime rib. High - than Low. Straight 325 or LOW 225. I have chosen the low 225.

I have gotten such wonderful advise so far and will be using bits and pieces from everyone.
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Old 06-09-2007, 01:04 PM   #16
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The last prime rib I cooked was at 225 degrees. I did sear it first. I used a meat thermometer and removed the roast at 135 degrees. During the rest the temperature rose to 142. It was perfect for me.

Residual cooking will be less at the lower temperture than if it's cooked at a higher temperature.

Another advantage of the low cooking temperature is that the roast is more evenly cooked. It's more consistent from the outside to the inside than it would be at higher temps.

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Old 06-09-2007, 01:32 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by jayco
The last prime rib I cooked was at 225 degrees.
How long do you think it will take about? I have read different advise from sites and recipes. I'm buying a 7lb boneless prime rib.

Some say expect at least 4 hours, but start checking at 3 hours. Others say about 21-23 minutes per lb which would end up being under 3 hours.

It's a little difficult when I would like to plan my sides. I'm making mashed and Green Beans Slow-Cooked with Bacon and Onions on the stove.

I will probably remove roast at around 135 degrees. I'm still thinking about it.


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Old 06-09-2007, 02:16 PM   #18
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That sounds like a great menu.

When I removed my roast from the fridge it's temp was 32 degrees. After one hour on the counter and the searing it was still at 42 degrees. (Internal)

It was a 3 1/2 pound roast.

It went into the oven at 11:40.

After 1 hour of cooking time it was at 84 degrees. After two hours it was at 122 degrees.

At 2 1/2 hours it hit 135 degrees. After about 20 minutes resting time it was at 142 degrees.

With your menu you shouldn't have any problems with the sides.

Hopefully the times of my roast will give you a good idea of when to start them.
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Old 06-09-2007, 03:34 PM   #19
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For a more fail safe method with less guessing, and especially considering that you have not done this before, do what Andy said. Everyone has their own methods but the one Andy suggested is the most basic and easiest to execute and you'll get a good result.

Do NOT cook the roast past medium. Remember that once to remove the roast from the oven, there will still be carryover cooking so if you're shooting for medium, take the roast out at about 138-140. Let it rest for 5-10 minutes and then cut it. If you're not sure and don't want to overcook it, then take it out even sooner, at 135. Remember that you can always cook it a little more but you can't go back once you overcook it. If people want it cooked more, then cut off individual slices and pop it back in to oven or saute it.

Do NOT get the sirloin roast. Sirloin roasts are leaner and have less flavor than a rib roast and are less forgiving if you screw it up. Given that it's for a special occasion, don't do yourself a disservice just to save a few dollars.
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Old 06-09-2007, 06:00 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayco
That sounds like a great menu.

When I removed my roast from the fridge it's temp was 32 degrees. After one hour on the counter and the searing it was still at 42 degrees. (Internal)

It was a 3 1/2 pound roast.

It went into the oven at 11:40.

After 1 hour of cooking time it was at 84 degrees. After two hours it was at 122 degrees.

At 2 1/2 hours it hit 135 degrees. After about 20 minutes resting time it was at 142 degrees.

With your menu you shouldn't have any problems with the sides.

Hopefully the times of my roast will give you a good idea of when to start them.
Well so much for the average 20 minutes per pound. Yours is an average of 43 minutes per pound. If I buy a 7 lb roast that would be 301 minutes. I don't think that would be accururate for a 7lb roast as most sites I come across say between 3 and 4 hours or average 20-23 minutes per pound.

I am defintely cooking this at 225 because I have decided to follow this recipe. Anyone have any suggestions about it, let me know.
Family Secrets #49: Prime Rib of Beef - Picture Perfect

I'm still trying to figure out estimate time. I guess i'm going to figure about 3 hours and another 15/20 minutes of resting time. So my estimate is put it in the oven at In the oven 11:45
Done hopefully by 2:45 plus add resting period.
So I'm guessing i'll start my sides around 2:15.
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