"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-02-2010, 12:33 AM   #1
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
ISO technique for making velvety pate'

For New Year's Eve every year, we share teh night with some good Canadian friends from across the river. We cook up a massive meal and toast in the new year at midnight. We sometimes play games, or watch a hockey game, or sometimes, we just talk and catch up. The wife of the couple loves a good liver pate'. This year, I made up a pate' from calve's liver. I braised 2 lbs. of calves liver in water after dicing it up. I cooked it until it was just done, and had a buttery tenderness. I drained the broth and added 1/2 cup of butter. I then seasoned it with onion, garlic, salt, ground coriander, and freshly ground black pepper. I then used a hand blender to create my pate' I wasn't satisfied with the texture, as it was grainy with bits of cartillage floating around in the mixture. I added water and simmered the mixture for another two hours, hoping to break down the cartillage and any other tougher bits. I drained it in a fine seive until firm. I tested again and still found the grainy texture. I forced the pate' through a fine, wire seive, which did remove the cartilage and the larger pieces of liver (like grains of sand). I tried it again and it was deliscious in flavor, but still had that graininess. I put it in hte fridge overnight to serve to our guests the next day.

Our guests brought some store-bought pate, I don't remember the brand, and we served all three, my homemade with the two varieties from the store. The flavors were no contest. The woman guest was so dissatisfied with the comercial pate' that she threw it in the garbage. She absolutely loved the flavor of my preperation. I too agreed that in flavor, the comercial stuff was terrible, while mine made me very happy. But here's the part that's driving me crazy. The comercial pate' was silky smooth, with no grainy texture at all. My homemade pate' was far superior in flavor, but the texture didn't measure up, in my opinion. It had a texture that was between a good pate', and deviled ham.

Anybody know any techniques for creating a velvety smooth pate'? I could use some help with this one. I've got the flavor down to near perfection, or so said our guest. But the texture that I want just isn't there yet. Maybe I need to try a different type of liver?

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 09:02 AM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Silversage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 863
GW,

Have you tried forcing the mixture through a very fine drum sieve? When I make lemon curd, I always force it through a fine strainer to get out any 'scrambles' or chalaza. The same technique might work here.
__________________

__________________
Silversage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 09:14 AM   #3
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silversage View Post
GW,

Have you tried forcing the mixture through a very fine drum sieve? When I make lemon curd, I always force it through a fine strainer to get out any 'scrambles' or chalaza. The same technique might work here.
I did force it through the finest sieve I have. It's a fine, wire-mesh sieve that I often use for sifting flour. It took out the sand-grain sized particles. But the pate' still wasn't velvety smooth. But thanks anyway.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 09:49 AM   #4
Sous Chef
 
Silversage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 863
GW,

I don't have any experience with pates, but am just throwing out suggestions here. How about a fine chinois?
__________________
Silversage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 10:06 AM   #5
Master Chef
 
jabbur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Newport News, VA
Posts: 5,481
I have no experience with this but maybe after pushing it through the fine mesh, give is a whirl with your blender again or in a food processor. Maybe it needs that extra whipping action to smooth it out after the larger grains have been removed.
__________________
I could give up chocolate but I'm no quitter!
jabbur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 11:25 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
I would say a steel blade of a food processor would work better than your hand mixer. Nothing in the hand mixer to cut things up and smooth everything out.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 12:08 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf View Post
I would say a steel blade of a food processor would work better than your hand mixer. Nothing in the hand mixer to cut things up and smooth everything out.
Elf, I think Goodweed used an immersion blender to purée the paté, not a mixer.

GW, I find the metal blade of the food processor is far superior to the immersion blender for a smooooooth paté texture. AND for good measure, force it through a fine sieve (I use my tamis).
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 01:19 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Aaaaa...thanks ChefJune. I saw "hand blender" and my mind went to "hand mixer.: I agree, the food processor would still be better.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 04:02 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Well allrighty then. I'll give the food processor idea a try and see if that works better. Thanks everyone.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 07:09 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Personally I do not like beef or even calf liver, thought you can make it right.
Of course I am not a pro on pate but for chopped liver I cook it with the carrots and then add some of the carrots to foods processor when you are chopping it. Of course I also like to add hardboiled egg like any good chopped liver it is not good with an egg and some fried onions with the fat they were fried in, all of this smoothes out the texture of liver. But in reality I’d go with chicken liver over beef any day.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.