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Old 10-01-2016, 12:13 AM   #41
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RBCookin, did you have a 'bistecca alla fiorentina' by any chance? They're HUGE and delicious, from Chianina cattle. Now THAT is an experience|
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Old 10-01-2016, 01:54 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
RBCookin, did you have a 'bistecca alla fiorentina' by any chance? They're HUGE and delicious, from Chianina cattle. Now THAT is an experience|
I did not, but I did watch a family of 4 sharing one. I had a fillet from a chianina at Osteria Bottega di Lornano (about 5 km northeast of Siena) and it was wonderful. The bistecca alla fiorentino was simply too big for even my wife and I to share. For those who don't know, it's the largest porterhouse I've ever seen, and cut 2 inches thick, cooked medium rare (you don't get any choice, so those who prefer their steak dry and tasteless, don't bother ordering it).
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Old 10-01-2016, 03:14 AM   #43
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where is this thread going.....I'm confused as usual......:)
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Old 10-06-2016, 10:46 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Today I was looking through our weekly supermarket flyer for the coming week.
I saw Certified Angus Beef Top Round Roast on sale for $2.49/Lb.

My question to you is...

Do YOU buy this cut of meat (Angus or not) and how do YOU use this cut of meat?
I came across this article today about the German dish sauerbraten:
http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-germ...rbraten-234101

The recipe calls for bottom round, but I found this interesting page that says top and bottom rounds have about the same degree of toughness, so they should cook similarly:
http://meat.tamu.edu/ansc-307-honors/meat-tenderness/
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Old 10-06-2016, 01:06 PM   #45
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Ok, I'll weigh in here on beef round. use inside round, top round roasts, and eyed of round to make in mu8ltiple says. Here are some suggestions.

1. If you are comfortable with your meat market, round has full flavor, and is lean. Chop fine for beef tatar, or any of the raw-beef recipes that require chopped or ground beef.

2. Sliced into steaks, against the grain, and about 1 inch thick, tenderize by stabbing to death with a fork, or meat tenderizing device, with meat tenderizer containing papain, then cook over very hot coals for steak. Slice very thin against the grain and use in sandwiches.

3. Roast just to rar3 state, and slice very thin to serve in open faced sandwiches with gravy.

4., use option 2, but dredge in eggwash and seasoned flour. Pan fry until well done. Add beef pan gravy, mushrooms, and onions. Cover and simmer for about 40 minutes to make Swiss Steak.

5. My favorite, use the whole roastm, especially eye of round, or inside round. Place in a water-tight container with a corned beef pickling solution. Let it hang out for two weeks in the solution at 40' F. Remove and sloow cook it for an internal temp of about 180' f. Slice thin, across the grain, for wonderful corned beef. If you want, you can take the uncooked corned beef, sprinkle the outside with coarse grind pepper, and slowly smoke it to make fabulous pastrami.

Round doesn't have to be tough and chewey, and it has lots of flavor.
teat it right and you have something special.

DW always expect round steak to be nearly inedible as she has false teeth, and her meat needs to be very tender. Buy treeting the round steak with Tender-Loving Care (pun intended) Ican give her great tasting round steak that she has no trouble with. And it always surprises her. Of course look at the meat to avoid gristle, or connecting tissue. Also note that there is very little fat, and so you must take care not to overcook, or dry out the meat. Beef round can be your friend.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-06-2016, 01:18 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by expatgirl View Post
where is this thread going.....I'm confused as usual......:)
My original question was simple. Do you buy this cut? If you do, what do you cook with it?

I am aware of how it can be used, just curious as to how popular a cut it is with folks here.
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Old 10-06-2016, 03:16 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
My original question was simple. Do you buy this cut? If you do, what do you cook with it?

I am aware of how it can be used, just curious as to how popular a cut it is with folks here.
I try to purchase locally grown 1/4 cow and it comes in the mix of steaks roasts, livers, hearts, etc. I have purchased it, but is a favorite for only certain meals that are made very rarely do to DW's preferences.

Hope this answers your original question more accurately.



seeeeeeeya- chief Lognwidn of he North
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