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Old 09-25-2016, 12:49 PM   #1
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Just Curious

Today I was looking through our weekly supermarket flyer for the coming week.
I saw Certified Angus Beef Top Round Roast on sale for $2.49/Lb.

My question to you is...

Do YOU buy this cut of meat (Angus or not) and how do YOU use this cut of meat?
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Old 09-25-2016, 01:06 PM   #2
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We've bought Angus beef cuts before. I personally didn't see any difference in what we normally get versus the Angus beef. Top round roast can be cut up and used for stew meat or any similar dish. It obviously can be ground for ground round. We've roasted it whole using Craig's 500 for 5, then 200 for 1 hour per pound method and it makes a decent roast beef sliced thin.
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Old 09-25-2016, 01:11 PM   #3
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I slow roast whole inside rounds(which contains the top round) at work every day(300F). We use them for our beef sandwiches. We cook to rare, leave overnight, then, cut into 4 pieces, clean out the fat and gristle, and slice at 1 against the grain. We then portion it and reheat it a few seconds until warm. It's too lean for stew, I mean, you can use it alright, but it's not ideal. But, it is tough meat so you need to either braise, or stew, it for a long time, or cut it somehow into small pieces or slices so you can chew it easier.
I use the whole round also for burgers. I have lots of steak trim on hand so I add 20% of that for a medium ground beef. Works well because the round is typically the least expensive cuts and I have lots of fat available. We usually do about 60 lbs at a time..
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Old 09-25-2016, 03:03 PM   #4
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I'm not a big fan of top round myself. I prefer fattier cuts.

So I guess my answer is no, I don't buy this cut.
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Old 09-25-2016, 03:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I'm not a big fan of top round myself. I prefer fattier cuts.

So I guess my answer is no, I don't buy this cut.
I'm with you there. I don't buy it for home, either. I use it commercially because of it's price and availability..It's also a big hunk of meat, so it is easy to work with because it requires little cleaning/trimming...
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Old 09-25-2016, 03:24 PM   #6
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I use top round, bottom round and rump roasts to braise long and low either whole for pot roast or cubes for stew.
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Old 09-25-2016, 03:38 PM   #7
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I rarely buy it. I prefer chuck roast for braising and I don't make roast beef since theres just two of us.
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Old 09-25-2016, 03:57 PM   #8
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I cut it up once and put it in the crock pot for a stew. I don't remember what I was expecting, but it was very tender and came out delicious. Now I'm trying to find the recipe again because I found some more for sale and I want to repeat what I did.
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Old 09-25-2016, 05:37 PM   #9
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At $2.49 a pound I'd buy it for pot roast or to grind with fat added to the mix.
And it would do well cubed for use in chili and stews.

Maybe even thin sliced for steak sammies.

As far as Certified Angus goes I'd look for Prime, Choice, or Select before I worry about the color of the steer/cow.

What Is Certified Angus Beef®? | Burger Conquest
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Old 09-25-2016, 06:10 PM   #10
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I confused the intent of my question by adding the Angus part. I am really only concerned about that particular cut of meat commercially available from any breed.

A while back, I had a discussion with the meat manager at my local supermarket and his opinion was that you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between Angus and other once cooked and on your plate. He viewed it as a marketing device only.
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