"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-16-2009, 04:55 PM   #11
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Just a word of caution: don't salt your steak until just before you cook it. Salting the meat in advance helps to pull the natural moisture out of it, and can result in dry steak.
While it is true that salting draws out moisture that is not the whole story. Salting steak ahead of time (say 24 hours or so) is an excellent technique known as dry brining that does not result in dry meat. Initially the salt draws moisture out, but then if you wait a little bit that now salty liquid in then drawn back into the meat and seasons the entire piece from the inside out.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2009, 05:28 PM   #12
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I'm sure you've heard of Champaigne. But Champaigne is not Champaigne unless it is created in the Champaigne Valley of France. The same is true of several other famous foods. Kobe beef is the same as well. It is a particular breed of beef grown in the Kobe' Valley of Japan. It is a highly prized and pricey product. Beef in general is very expensive in Japan as most of it is imported due to little land mass. What others have stated about Wagyu Beef in the U.S. is correct. It originated from the Kobe' Beef stock in Japan before it became illigal to export the famous breed's sperm cells. It is a closely guarded product.

Do just a bit of research and you will find many varieties of fine cheese from France, Spain, England, and other countries that reserve the name of that product according to strict manufacturing processes, and only in the region of origin for that product. Many are the wines, and vinagers that share this trait. Kobe' beef is the only meat I know of that is as closely guarded.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2009, 01:02 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
my_psychosis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Iowa
Posts: 161
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Just a word of caution: don't salt your steak until just before you cook it. Salting the meat in advance helps to pull the natural moisture out of it, and can result in dry steak.
Wow. Thank you, I never knew this. I love a juicy medium rare myself but my boyfriend loves dry burnt meat. ( Icky, I know)
This will help to make them right for each of us.
__________________
“I went into a restaurant. The menu said, ‘Breakfast anytime.’ So I ordered French toast during the Renaissance.” Steven Wright
my_psychosis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2009, 04:38 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,228
Mislabelling a product to create the impression of a superior product is a pet peeve of mine. A chain restaurant here lists an american kobe hamburger. Most beef sold as Kobe in US is probably Waygu, and may or may not meet the standards of Kobe. Cheeses are commonly mislabeled. Try to find a Swiss made swiss. To the wine industries credit, I find less mislabeled wines than in most food products. I have never seen an american Bordeaux or Burgundy or Chianti, except maybe in jug wines. One product that has gained favor as a superior product is Angus Beef. This is a brand name, not an indication of quality. There is even a USDA choice Angus listed on their web site.
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2009, 05:36 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
Mislabelling a product to create the impression of a superior product is a pet peeve of mine. A chain restaurant here lists an american kobe hamburger. Most beef sold as Kobe in US is probably Waygu, and may or may not meet the standards of Kobe. Cheeses are commonly mislabeled. Try to find a Swiss made swiss. To the wine industries credit, I find less mislabeled wines than in most food products. I have never seen an american Bordeaux or Burgundy or Chianti, except maybe in jug wines. One product that has gained favor as a superior product is Angus Beef. This is a brand name, not an indication of quality. There is even a USDA choice Angus listed on their web site.
Whoa there!! First off, how the heck do you get any shopping done what with all that label checking? Good grief!

Second - "Angus" beef is not only an indication of quality, it's a BREED. Both Black & Red Angus beef are considered superior beef. As is Charolais. As is Hereford. As is Wagyu/Kobe. It's all in the mouth of the beholder, & you have no business laying down determining whether it's quality or not. That's just your opinion.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2009, 06:09 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Whoa there!! First off, how the heck do you get any shopping done what with all that label checking? Good grief!

Second - "Angus" beef is not only an indication of quality, it's a BREED. Both Black & Red Angus beef are considered superior beef. As is Charolais. As is Hereford. As is Wagyu/Kobe. It's all in the mouth of the beholder, & you have no business laying down determining whether it's quality or not. That's just your opinion.
Hold the phone, everyone. There is indeed a brand of beef called "Angus Beef". Just as there is a brand of ground beef called "All Beef Patties". The company that owns the brand may grow the breed Angus, or Black Angus. But just because they own the brand name, doesn't gaurantee that the product they sell is equal to the name.

There is a restaurant chain called "Black Angus" that own their own cattle ranches and do serve the breed "Black Angus" exclusively. And you can expect that the steaks they sell are of superior quality. But I dont' really know enough about the owner company of the Angus Beef brand to say whether or not they sell true Black or red Angus Beef.

I think that I am restating the idea that BigJim68 was trying to make. Misrepresentation is commonplace in industry. For instance, there are multiple versions of the Excedrin product whose name would suggest that the particular version has been specially formulated for a specific treatment, when in fact, there are several different versions of the product, each with a specific name, such as Excedrine Migraine, or Excedrine Extra Strength, with exactly the same ingredients.

For those who aren't savvy about beef grading in the U.S., there are many supermarkets that will highlight "Select" beef as if it were of higher quality than what they normally sell, when in fact, USDA Select is lower quality and good only for ground beef and stewing. Are the stores lying about the select beef? No they aren't. But they are trying to pull the wool over the eyes of the uneducated meat buyer.

I don't like the suggestive labeling practices of many companies. So I read labels and try to remain educated about products. We all need to do that.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2009, 09:38 AM   #17
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,228
GW. Thanks for restating my case. I don't mean to imply that Kobe, Angus (correctly Certified Angus), or other designations are indications of an inferior product. They can be, and often are, superior products. I am saying that brand names are brand names, and exist to set a product apart from others on the shelf. Only a few products are government graded, and even within grades there exists a wide difference in quality. IMO great food starts with great ingredients, and it takes only a short while to acquaint yourself with quality issues. I see Kobe going the way of Angus, Select, Choice, Prime, etc. i.e. being used as a marketing tool with little or no regard to the actual quality of the product. Kobe is a city in Japan, and produces a limited quantity of meat raised in a special way. Most of it is sold in Japan. It would not surprise me to learn that more Kobe is sold in NYC than is produced in Kobe.
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 10:08 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 333
Send a message via AIM to danpeikes
If I rember correctly, and no I have not confirmed this, but I remeber AB saying on episode of ICA that "America Kobe" is Waygu that has been bred together with black angus. Yes both of these are brand names. I would assume that much of this meat is high grade due to the great DNA, but I would guess that not all this meat is high grade. Just my $.02
__________________

__________________
danpeikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.