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Old 04-08-2009, 03:57 PM   #1
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Kobe beef

Hi everyone I am working on writing an article about Kobe beef. And I need some more ideas for spices that go well with Kobe. I am trying to think but today is kinda distracting. Help me out?

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Old 04-08-2009, 04:21 PM   #2
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If you're writing an article about Kobe beef, than I assume you've eaten it.

That said, there really aren't any specific "spices", etc., that "go well with Kobe". Kobe beef is nothing more than a very high-quality variety of beef. Apart from not cooking it to death, literally ANY preparation used for high-quality beef works with Kobe. There's nothing secret or special about it.
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Old 04-08-2009, 06:04 PM   #3
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I just read that Kobe beef is Magyu beef from Kobe Japan. Like Champagne and sparkling wine. Ha.
BC. I think it is special. But you are right. I was just needing some inspiration.
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Old 04-08-2009, 06:14 PM   #4
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So are you saying that you haven't even tasted the product you're writing about? What publication are you writing for, because frankly I can't imagine a cooking, dining, or even agricultural publication wanting an article written by someone who hadn't even tasted the product.

Oh, & by the way, it's "Wagyu" beef, not "Magyu". And the product in Japan is raised specifically different from the same product in the U.S. But I'm not going to do your research for you. . . .
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Old 04-08-2009, 08:12 PM   #5
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Oh no I have eaten it, a number of times. Yes I meant to type wagyu, Thank you for the correction. And yes you are right American wagyu is different than Kobe. Just as I imagine wagyu beef from other parts of Japan is different than the wagyu from Kobe. You still haven't provided me with any inspiration BC. We have pretty much just talked about things we both already know.
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Old 04-09-2009, 07:58 AM   #6
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It is delicious, isn't it? Unfortunately, now that Wagyu is raised in the U.S. I doubt that many - if any - restaurants here are serving the real "Kobe" from Japan, even if that's what they call it on the menu.

The last time I probably had what was most likely "real" Kobe beef, it was at a restaurant a number of years ago when Kobe beef - & Japanese cuisine in general - was just becoming popular. It was a perfectly cooked (medium-rare if I remember correctly) filet mignon served on a bed of wasabi-spiked mashed potatoes. Absolutely fabulous!

I think the problem you're going to run into as far as recipe inspiration is that terrific beef like Kobe/Wagyu shines best if prepared with simplicity. You really don't want to marinate it or season or sauce it heavily with anything. Other than serving it relatively plain with an interesting side dish like the restaurant served it to me, I can't imagine gilding a nice Kobe/Wagyu steak with much more than perhaps a light pat of compound butter. Something lightly laced with herbs would be nice.

I'd definitely avoid any of the usual steak sauces, cream sauces (like Bearnaise), or the bacon that one sometimes gets wrapped around a filet mignon. I think all/any of the above would mask the great flavor of the beef.

How do you normally enjoy your beef - Wagyu or otherwise?
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Old 04-09-2009, 08:01 AM   #7
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I think the problem you're going to run into as far as recipe inspiration is that terrific beef like Kobe/Wagyu shines best if prepared with simplicity.
I agree with this 100%. I have never even had Kobe or Wagyu, but I have had other high quality steaks. I would never want more than salt and occasionally black pepper on my good steaks. I am sure I would feel the same about Kobe if/when I have the opportunity to try it. I would want the flavor of the beef and nothing else.
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Old 04-09-2009, 08:17 AM   #8
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select your salt and pepper carefully...a Jurassic or other mineral rich salt without iodine, a fine fruity pepper coarsely ground, a wood fired grill, and a bit of compound butter sauce on the plate with the fresh blanched and glazed (with the butter) veg (carrot, radish, turnip) and sauteed (in shallot butter with a hint of cognac) mushrooms

finish with gray salt
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:18 AM   #9
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I was raised the higher the quality, the less you added to the steaks. We marinate the lower quality cuts to give them more taste but my father would never let anything more than salt and pepper touch his fillet mignon. I couldn't imagine adding anything to Kobe (if I had a chance to try it). My father would die before adding more than salt and pepper to it.
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:37 AM   #10
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Thanks BC and everyone else. I definitely agree with all of you, I always stick to simple salt and pepper with the better meat.The recipe for the article has been finished since Monday. BUt there is another section in the article with other ideas for flavors, hence the question. I ended up listing some other types of salt and pepper and some relatively mild herbs.
Here is a photo of the finished product.
Those are roasted fingerling potatoes with rosemary. The kobe is top sirloin and it is seasoned with sea slt and black pepper. I finished with a mount of butter. It was good!
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:47 AM   #11
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Do you mean a mound of butter? A dollop maybe but a mound seems like a lot of butter.
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:51 AM   #12
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Nils that looks great!

Callisto, if I am not mistaken, mounting with butter means putting butter on the steak. It is not a typo.
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:55 AM   #13
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Callisto, if I am not mistaken, mounting with butter means putting butter on the steak. It is not a typo.
Ah, so it's just grammar, not typing.
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:58 AM   #14
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Thanks GB. Ya, it's a classical French cooking technique - Monter au Beurre.
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:58 AM   #15
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I have actually only seen "mount" used when talking about sauces. In that case to mount means to whisk cold pieces of butter into a sauce. I am not sure how that applies to steaks where you are just putting butter on top of the steak, but hey it works for me.
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Old 04-09-2009, 11:18 AM   #16
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I have actually only seen "mount" used when talking about sauces. In that case to mount means to whisk cold pieces of butter into a sauce. I am not sure how that applies to steaks where you are just putting butter on top of the steak, but hey it works for me.
That seems to be what it means Beurre monte - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

To me you could use the word mount but you would have to use it as a verb. "I finished by mounting a dollop of butter on the steak."
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Old 04-09-2009, 11:27 AM   #17
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Oh Nils - what a FABULOUS plate of perfectly cooked beef!!!! I'm SO jealous. My husband doesn't eat red meat, so I only get to make it for myself when he's away or when we dine out. He wouldn't mind if I just made it for myself, but it's such a pain to cook two separate meals. BUT - he does have a business trip planned for next month. After seeing your photo, I just may have to make some plans in advance to buy myself a really nice piece of beef to play with while he's gone. (Gee - that sounds a bit pornographic, doesn't it? LOL!)
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Old 04-09-2009, 11:46 AM   #18
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That is a beautiful plate of beef, cooked just the way that I like it. I have never had the joy of eating Kobe beef. The only aged beef that I've eaten was from Gallagher's, if you can even classify that as aged.
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Old 04-14-2009, 12:31 PM   #19
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Ok here is the finished product.
How to Pan Fry Kobe Beef
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Old 04-14-2009, 04:51 PM   #20
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I guess I'm overly confused on this one. Why would you take the best cut of beef and cook it in the worst way possible? I wouldn't pan fry the worst cut of beef for my worst enemy and I'd rather go hungry than pan fry a Kobe steak. It's sacrilege to me. And you still got monte au beurre wrong. And since your blog doesn't allow comments, you have several grammatical errors including incorrect spacing between sentences and incorrect sentence structure.
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