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Old 09-25-2006, 11:02 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philso
i understand that u.s., canadian, & australian ranches are recently raising "kobe" beef. how it compares to actual kobe beef, i don't know.
The cattle are being raised outside of Japan because it's much cheaper that way. When the cattle are at about 80% or so of the way to the point where they can be slaughtered, they are then shipped back to Japan for the finishing touches.

Wagyu cattle that are completely raised and slaughtered outside of Japan are not labeled and marketed as Kobe beef to the best of my knowledge.

Like Chef Jen said: try it. You ask a group of people something about food and you'll never get a consensus. The only way is to try it yourself.
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Old 09-26-2006, 12:33 AM   #22
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So, what's the big deal about this beef anyways? What does it taste like?


How does Wagyu beef taste? If it's cooked wrong, lousy. Bland. Not too flavorful. Kind of boring. If you cook it right? Awesome. Beef foie gras. Smooth, velvety, incomparably sweet with a subtle tang of savor that lingers on the palate like a rare perfume. It's a Japanese thang, I guess, and a Westerner used to eating a huge plate of aged beef (which is also something I adore) might not be able to fully appreciate the subtlety of Wagyu.
And true Kobe beef? Overrated. At ten times the price because the cow was raised on expensive land eating expensive Japanese grain and beer, the quality is not noticeably better than ordinary Wagyu beef that grades out to super-prime. About those legendary cow massages? It's in part because they don't have enough room to exercise in a normal paddock. American and Australian raised Wagyu cattle that get the oleaginous feed and a well designed exercise program grade out just fine, and I doubt even the most discerning palate could tell the difference if the grade was the same.


How do I cook Wagyu if I actually buy some?


"If you try to treat a Wagyu steak as if you were cooking beef, you will be sorry you did, and you will look down at your plate and say, "****, I spent that much money on this?" Don't do that. Think about quick-sear cooking techniques for things like rare tuna and foie gras, not about steak. If you do it right, you may just acquire an addiction for life. ;)
Open flames, preheated cast iron and Wagyu beef are friends. Good friends. A quick sear of thin pieces in a very hot flame works wonders, and if you are lucky enough to have a thick steak, you want it absolutely seared and crispy on the outside and raw and quivering on the inside, even if you do not normally eat your steak this way.
You can use an intensely preheated cast iron pan or grill to achieve this effect, but you cannot allow the steak to remain in contact with heat for long enough to melt all the fat and cause it to drip out of the internal structures of the meat, or you will end up with boringly tough, dry, expensive meat.
Wagyu is a fragile creature under heat. Treat it delicately and with the utmost care, and it will reward you with velvety perfection. Another good analogy to cooking Wagyu is that of a baked Alaska—you need to sear the outside, but if you let it sit under the heat too long, it will melt the ice cream inside, and you will have an unappetizing mess. The physical structure of Wagyu beef is not unlike ice cream in that it can literally melt and change into something very different from its ideal form."
http://members.tripod.com/~BayGourmet/wagyu.html
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Old 09-26-2006, 12:57 AM   #23
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Steven S - that certainly got me re-interested - thanks.
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Old 09-26-2006, 09:22 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mylegsbig
ROFL @ preferring angus beef to kobe
I prefer angus beef too.

IMO it tastes better. Just MO.

I do like Kobe beef, don't get me wrong. But, I'll take Neiman Ranch beef over it any day.
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Old 09-26-2006, 09:26 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven S
For those of you who like to read, Jeffrey Steingarten's book "The Man Who Ate Everything" has a good chapter on Kobe/Wagyu... its called "Where's The Wagyu?"
Excellent book!

I was reading it while eating lunch by myself at La Bonne Soupe in NYC and when I looked up he was standing about 5 feet away!! He winked at me!!
Wish I'd had a pen and a less crowded restaurant.
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Old 09-26-2006, 11:27 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
Excellent book!

I was reading it while eating lunch by myself at La Bonne Soupe in NYC and when I looked up he was standing about 5 feet away!! He winked at me!!
Wish I'd had a pen and a less crowded restaurant.
Dang - what a thing to happen!!!!!! lol
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Old 09-26-2006, 11:28 AM   #27
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i got interested in kobe beef after watching the iron chef episode.

there are different opinions on here, but one thing's for sure: it REALLY looked good on tv... i have a knot on my head from trying to jump inside the tv to bite the grilled ribeye cut.
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Old 09-26-2006, 12:25 PM   #28
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Wagyu is American Kobe Beef

I have had both Wagyu and Kobe Beef, but generally only use it on high end caterings. Wagyu sells for about $39.95 per pound. Wagyu is the American verison of Kobe Beef and I can tell the difference and like Wagyu much better.
I think Wagyu meat is awesome because of its marbling which results in a never-before-experienced succulence that egnites your taste buds. The fat in the meat has more monounsaturated fats and melts at room temperature which makes Wagyu beef suitable as part of a lower-cholesterol diet.
It's really not a beef to generally be used cooking your nightly meal for the family.
Chef Mark
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Old 09-26-2006, 12:30 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Webster
I have had both Wagyu and Kobe Beef, but generally only use it on high end caterings. Wagyu sells for about $39.95 per pound. Wagyu is the American verison of Kobe Beef and I can tell the difference and like Wagyu much better.
I think Wagyu meat is awesome because of its marbling which results in a never-before-experienced succulence that egnites your taste buds. The fat in the meat has more monounsaturated fats and melts at room temperature which makes Wagyu beef suitable as part of a lower-cholesterol diet.
It's really not a beef to generally be used cooking your nightly meal for the family.
Chef Mark
You sound just like the Wagyu beef website without the moo!
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Old 09-26-2006, 02:14 PM   #30
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I had a Kobe beef filet mignon a couple of years ago at an upscale European-style bistro in our town (that I ADORE!!). It was one of that night's specials.

Filet mignon has never been my favorite beef cut - while it's usually very tender, I've rarely had one that had any real beef taste - but this Kobe filet was absolutely fabulous. Fork tender & really "beefy". They served it on a bed of Wasabi mashed potatoes, & the combination was a real winner.
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