"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-14-2008, 11:46 AM   #21
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Dry brine just means that you coat the meat in salt and let it sit. The salt initially draws liquid out, but then as you let it site the salty liquid will then be drawn back into the meat. It is for flavor. You season the meat inside and out, not just outside.

Yes you can dry brine poultry and pork as well.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 11:49 AM   #22
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by DramaQueen View Post
Interesting. I guess I missed that. Now what is the purpose for the brine; to bring out the flavor or to tenderize the meat? Is this a special brine? Can or do you dry brine poultry and pork?
Apparently it works well for chicken and pork although I have not tried it yet.

The following is ripped from the Internet and answers your first question.

"I'm no chef or accomplished cook whatsoever, but when I got into cooking, the first thing I learned was steak, and have been refining it since. I've changed my technique over the years, and two that I've picked up recently have helped immensely. I actually got the ideas over at cooks illustrated, separately, and decided to combine them. I've actually seen the techniques in other places as well.

First, start off with good steaks as mentioned. I'd suggest ribeyes like everyone else. Tenderloin/filet mignon, NY Strip, porterhouse/tbones are good too. Try and get the best you can afford. Choice or prime if you can :). Get them thick, at least 1.25 or more if you can.

Next, at least one hour before cooking, salt them. Yes presalt them. Don't lightly salt them either. Get some kosher and cover the steak. Not super heavy, but a fair amount. Remember, this is a big steak. All sides. Then place on a flat plate, cover with saran wrap, and put them back into the fridge or leave them out. I put them in the fridge, I'll explain why later.

Yes this draws moisture out. This isn't necessarily such a bad thing. Dry aging gets rid of moisture too, which concentrates the beef flavor. But what happens is, after about 1/2 an hour, the moisture that is drawn out mixes with the salt. After being drawn out, the meat pulls this salt water back in. After about an hour, you'll notice a lot of the water has been drawn back in. Not all but most. This actually flavors the meat all the way through. yeah I didn't believe it, but it does. Also "supposedly" tenderizes the meat a tiny bit. I can't say this for sure, since I'm not food scientist. At this point, you can pat the steaks dry. Don't worry about completely drying it.

Now you can apply whatever other seasoning you want, if you didn't at the beginning with the salt. black pepper, garlic powder etc.

The second technique I do is a reverse sear. Preheat an oven to 275. Insert a polder type probe into the steak where you normally measure temp. Place the steak on a cooling rack and into the oven. Watch the temp. We're looking for 90-95 here, for medium rare. If you only have an instant read therm, you'll have to check with times, as I don't cook that way. before the steak hits 90-95, preheat a cast iron skillet (preferable)regular skllet or grill. Medium-hot heat here. Not high, not medium, somewhere in the middle.

Once the steak hits desired temp (i go for 92F :)), pull the steak out, pull the probe out, and sear on each side for no more than two minutes each side. You can oil or not, your choice. If not a fatty cut, oil will help the sear along without having seasoning/meat stick to the skillet. No more than two minutes. Start with 2 the first time, adjust to preference later. Pull the meat, rest for ten minutes. You should have a perfect medium rare steak all the way through, without that nasty gray band you see on thick steaks sometimes. Adjust any of the temps and time for your equipment and experience.

So why the reverse sear? Three things. first, with a reverse sear, you dry out the surface of the steak completely. This is good. When the steak hits a hot pan, heat must be used to evaporate the moisture on the surface of the meat. if you dry out the steak, the surface starts to brown immediately. This helps with achieving a better sear on the outside, without heating up the steak too much in the middle. This in turn helps out with item number two. It reduces the nasty gray band you see sometimes in thick cut steaks, between the browned surface and the red interior. This stuff is dry, and tough etc. With the reverse sear, the minimum amount of time on the searing heat doesn't heat up that area too much. Third, and quite important, is enzymes. This is stolen from cooks illustrated. Enzymes called cathespins help break down meat (i.e. dry and wet aging). Well when heated or warmed up, they're like enzymes on steroids. They stop working at 120 or so though. So if you can keep them warm, for an extended period of time, you can mimic the effects of aging within the 1/2 hour or so it takes in the oven. With the reverse sear, you're having these enzymes working in over drive for a longer period of time, far away from their death temp of 120 or lower. They even recommend going straight from fridge to oven, to give the enzymes even more time to work.

This is all on the CI site for anyone interested. They have videos showing it all too. Look for "when should I salt my steaks" and "pan searing thick cut steaks (may/june 200y issue)." Long winded post I know (WOW), and I apologize for that. But I wanted to back up my rambling. And it's not that hard.

Summary? Three steps. (1)Salt thick cut good steaks, one hour. (2) Put in an Oven at 275F until 90-95 degrees. (3) Immediately sear, for no more than two minutes each side on medium hot pan."
__________________

__________________
Buzz

"There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and those who have met them in battle. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion." Unknown
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 11:51 AM   #23
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
OK, good information here, but we need to get this back on topic.

Back to Kobe
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 12:01 PM   #24
Senior Cook
 
stinemates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Petaluma, CA
Posts: 250
Send a message via AIM to stinemates Send a message via MSN to stinemates Send a message via Yahoo to stinemates Send a message via Skype™ to stinemates
I should rename the thread to American Wagyu so there isn't any confusion (thanks ironchef)

One time I went to vegas and had one of these prepared at CraftSteak. I've gotta say, my steak was soo much better than theirs, which I had previously thought to be the best steak I've ever had.
__________________
stinemates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 12:03 PM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Is this the typical meat to fat ratio (not marbling) of Wasgyu or Kobe beef???
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 12:08 PM   #26
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Is this the typical meat to fat ratio (not marbling) of Wasgyu or Kobe beef???
I have the same question. The pictures show a very high ratio.

__________________
Buzz

"There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and those who have met them in battle. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion." Unknown
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 12:57 PM   #27
Head Chef
 
Jeff G.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1,352
As I don't particularly care to eat beef fat.. I will stick to leaner cuts.
__________________
Jeff G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 01:31 PM   #28
Senior Cook
 
stinemates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Petaluma, CA
Posts: 250
Send a message via AIM to stinemates Send a message via MSN to stinemates Send a message via Yahoo to stinemates Send a message via Skype™ to stinemates
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Is this the typical meat to fat ratio (not marbling) of Wasgyu or Kobe beef???
For American, yes.. if it's Wagyu from Japan, no!

This is what Japanese Wagyu looks like

__________________
stinemates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 01:35 PM   #29
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Big difference.
Not that I'd kick either one out of my kitchen
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 01:47 PM   #30
Senior Cook
 
stinemates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Petaluma, CA
Posts: 250
Send a message via AIM to stinemates Send a message via MSN to stinemates Send a message via Yahoo to stinemates Send a message via Skype™ to stinemates
Form what I have heard, Japanese Wagyu ends up tasting like the best beef you've ever had with the texture of velvety butter.

While I wouldn't mind it, I really loved the steak featured in this thread.
__________________

__________________
stinemates is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.