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Old 12-21-2011, 12:27 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
There are enzymes in milk that tenderize meat. Any meat. Have you ever seen a recipe that calls for bread soaked in milk, then squeezed before adding to ground meat? Most will say they do it because their mother did it that way. I myself will add about ¼ cup of milk to the ground meat for the burgers going on the grill. Makes them very tender and keeps them juicy. Even if you use the worst of ground meat.
Thanks Addie, I'll remember that. When I catch an Atlantic Blue Fish, I soak the fillets in milk. Otherwise, they have a sharp, bloody taste.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:36 AM   #22
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Thanks Addie, I'll remember that. When I catch an Atlantic Blue Fish, I soak the fillets in milk. Otherwise, they have a sharp, bloody taste.
I love fish filets that have been poached in milk.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:44 AM   #23
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I know what you mean about unevenly sliced liver TL. My daddy owned a meat market when I was a kid. When a butcher would apply for work my dad would have him slice liver to test his talent as a butcher. Dad always said that was the hardest thing to do properly, and he could slice perfect slices with either hand. They sell liver in "tubs" here so you can't even see what you have. Most times it's "chunks" of liver.
We have a meat market close to where I live. He has one of those show cases where the meat is laid out in trays not wrapped and already priced. The last time I went in there the butcher took a whole liver and sliced it into six evenly cut pieces. I took three of the slices. He has a new returning customer.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:51 AM   #24
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I love fish fillets that have been poached in milk.
Back in the days of sailing ships, the sailors loved a fish that is now known as a "Sailors Choice", but is actually in the "Croaker" family. The fish is so small that it's mostly bone and skin. However, if poached in milk for about 30 minutes, whole, after cleaning, then when done, the skin can be gently lifted from the fish, and the meat lifted right out of the skeleton, leaving nothing but skin and bones behind. The meat is pure white, super sweet and firm. I understand fully, why the sailors of old loved the fish.

Milk poached fish is very, very good eating.
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:02 AM   #25
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Milk poached fish is very, very good eating.
Yum!!!
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:05 AM   #26
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Back in the days of sailing ships, the sailors...
...I understand fully, why the sailors of old loved the fish.

Milk poached fish is very, very good eating.
Not seen it around much anymore but you could buy some famous ancient brand name non-cooked cod. It came in it's own cheap little wooden box. My dad liked it, but I could not eat it. I tried to be open pallet minded but it almost made me gag. I think there's something in what that kind of cod was that reminds me of your talk of meals aboard old sailing vessels. It was heavily salted or something.

Hey, , if he had soaked it in milk, maybe it would have been fine?

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Old 12-21-2011, 03:54 AM   #27
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Not seen it around much anymore but you could buy some famous ancient brand name non-cooked cod. It came in it's own cheap little wooden box. My dad liked it, but I could not eat it. I tried to be open pallet minded but it almost made me gag. I think there's something in what that kind of cod was that reminds me of your talk of meals aboard old sailing vessels. It was heavily salted or something.

Hey, , if he had soaked it in milk, maybe it would have been fine?

It's not cheap anymore!

I look at it now and just keep walking.

Creamed codfish on baked potatoes used to be an inexpensive meal when I was growing up.
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Old 12-21-2011, 08:19 AM   #28
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Maybe it has to do with the lack of cod in the ocean. Where I live, all seafood is more expensive than beef. It kills me because I love fish. Ever have swordfish kabobs, cooked over a direct bed of charcoal, with some sticks of maple thrown on the fire for smoke? Bush them with simple butter, and season with nothing more than salt and pepper. To die for, both in flavor, and the price of the fish is likely to lay you low.

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Old 12-21-2011, 08:24 AM   #29
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It's not cheap anymore!

I look at it now and just keep walking.

Creamed codfish on baked potatoes used to be an inexpensive meal when I was growing up.
I have three favorite childhood meals. And creamed codfish is one of them. In these here parts it is a tradition to make it on July 4th. But like you said, $$$$. I now consider it a special treat for myself and buy it once or twice a year. I add frozen peas to mine.

My second husband was a commercial fisherman. On the last catch, he would take one of the largest Cod and a Haddock. The Cod, he would salt right on the deck and hang it out to dry in the rigging. Gut them, filet them and bring them home. Fried Haddock the first night, creamed cod a couple of nights later.
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:56 PM   #30
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One of my favorite things when frying a whole chicken (well, yes, cut up), rolled in flour and fried in Crisco, was to get the liver to myself and then claim that it didn't have one. Whoever wants it can have the gizzard.

Liver & onions gets done with bacon like your original post. Good stuff.
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