"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-10-2019, 11:56 PM   #1
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,645
Meat pies

How do you make your meat pies?
Mine is a double crust pie wherr appropriate bulion is added to the water and salt is omited
The filling is fine dic potatoes, lightly browned, dicrd carrot, diced onion, black pepper, brownrd ground meat of choive, and minced garlic
Sometimes, I'll make pan gravy from thepan fond of the pan the meat was browmed in, but that,s rare. This id true comfort food that is great with ketchup put on top after a slice is plated. You can chane the flavors by changing the herbx and spices used to season the filling.

Seeeeya: Chief Longwind of the Nortb

__________________

Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2019, 05:45 AM   #2
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,238
When I think of "meat pies", I'm thinking hand pies. Empanadas are a favorite from any Latin culture. Love Jamaican patties. I consider tamales as a meat pie when meat is part of the filling.
__________________

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2019, 12:15 PM   #3
Sous Chef
 
Silversage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
How do you make your meat pies?
Mine is a double crust pie wherr appropriate bulion is added to the water and salt is omited

Seeeeya: Chief Longwind of the Nortb

Hey Chief! I'm just surprised that your favorite meat pie isn't a pasty! I haven't had one in 30 years - do you have a good recipe?
__________________
In our house, dog hair is a condiment!
OMG! I decided to blog!
Silversage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2019, 03:14 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 21,560
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
There is no link in your post. I assume you are talking about tourtière.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2019, 02:37 AM   #5
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,645
Pastie recipe

Pastie crust
2 cups A.P. Flour
1 and 1/2 tsp. Salt
6 tbs lard
6 tbs. water

Pastie Filling
2 russet potatoes, peeled and fine dice

1 cup rutabagga peeled and diced

1 mrdium size yellow onion, peeled and diced

3 cloves fresh Garlic, minced

1 lb. Diced Beef, or coarse-ground beef

1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp. Black Pepper

2 tbs pork fat/grease

Place diced potatoes in a bowl of cod water to remobe some of the starch.

Melt the pork fat in a large, heavy skilit. Add the onions and garlic.
Stir over medium hest until the onions become translucent. Add meat and season with salt and pepper. Brown. Transfer the meat to a large bow and set aside. Drain, and rince the potatoes.
Place the pan back onto the stove and add rutabagga and potatoes. Add 1/4 cup water to the pan and cover. Cook for ten minutes, stirring frequently. Remove cover and lightly brown the potato/rutabagga mixture. Remove to the same bowl as the meat.

Combine the lard , salt and flour for the dough. Cut the fat into the flour Add more fat and continue cutting it in until it all looks like pea-gravel. Add water and knead lightly until the dough is formed.

Pastie crist is not supposed to be as flaky and tender as pie crust, so knred it just a little. Divide the dough into four equal portons and shape them into balls. Flatten with hands to form a round disk. Place the douh onto a floured surface and roll into 9 inch circle. In a seperate bowl, combide 1 large egg with 3 tbs water to make an egg-wash. Spoon filling onto 1/2 of the douh, leaving a 2 inch rim uncovered. Brush the uncovered rim with egg-wash. Fold the top half of the dough over the filling so that the circle edges meet. Lightly press edges together. Roll the circle edgs back to form a dough handle. Place onto parchment paprt lined bakin pan. Repeat with the other douh portions. Brush all pasties with egg wash.

Bake at 375 degrees F. for 25 minutes. Remove and serve hot with ketchup, and, or beef gravy.

Pasties were made in England by wives of miners. The douh handles gave the miners spmething they could hang onto, and discard, as they generally didn't have a way of washing their hands in the mines. The crust had to be tough enogh so that tle pastie held together while it was eaten. Enterprising wives would make a dough snake to divide the pstie inside, witjh 2/3ds filled with the meat and veggie mixtue, and the other side filled with a fruit filling to make a desert. I do this with my pasties as well. I also make a tender, flaky crust as I wiil be eating mine from a plate, handle and all.

Pasties are a Yooper specialty, but are enjoed in many other places as well. Enjoy. These things are truly heaven on a plate.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2019, 07:30 AM   #6
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Pastie crust
2 cups A.P. Flour
1 and 1/2 tsp. Salt
6 tbs lard
6 tbs. water

Pastie Filling
2 russet potatoes, peeled and fine dice

1 cup rutabagga peeled and diced

1 mrdium size yellow onion, peeled and diced

3 cloves fresh Garlic, minced

1 lb. Diced Beef, or coarse-ground beef

1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp. Black Pepper

2 tbs pork fat/grease

Place diced potatoes in a bowl of cod water to remobe some of the starch.

Melt the pork fat in a large, heavy skilit. Add the onions and garlic.
Stir over medium hest until the onions become translucent. Add meat and season with salt and pepper. Brown. Transfer the meat to a large bow and set aside. Drain, and rince the potatoes.
Place the pan back onto the stove and add rutabagga and potatoes. Add 1/4 cup water to the pan and cover. Cook for ten minutes, stirring frequently. Remove cover and lightly brown the potato/rutabagga mixture. Remove to the same bowl as the meat.

Combine the lard , salt and flour for the dough. Cut the fat into the flour Add more fat and continue cutting it in until it all looks like pea-gravel. Add water and knead lightly until the dough is formed.

Pastie crist is not supposed to be as flaky and tender as pie crust, so knred it just a little. Divide the dough into four equal portons and shape them into balls. Flatten with hands to form a round disk. Place the douh onto a floured surface and roll into 9 inch circle. In a seperate bowl, combide 1 large egg with 3 tbs water to make an egg-wash. Spoon filling onto 1/2 of the douh, leaving a 2 inch rim uncovered. Brush the uncovered rim with egg-wash. Fold the top half of the dough over the filling so that the circle edges meet. Lightly press edges together. Roll the circle edgs back to form a dough handle. Place onto parchment paprt lined bakin pan. Repeat with the other douh portions. Brush all pasties with egg wash.

Bake at 375 degrees F. for 25 minutes. Remove and serve hot with ketchup, and, or beef gravy.

Pasties were made in England by wives of miners. The douh handles gave the miners spmething they could hang onto, and discard, as they generally didn't have a way of washing their hands in the mines. The crust had to be tough enogh so that tle pastie held together while it was eaten. Enterprising wives would make a dough snake to divide the pstie inside, witjh 2/3ds filled with the meat and veggie mixtue, and the other side filled with a fruit filling to make a desert. I do this with my pasties as well. I also make a tender, flaky crust as I wiil be eating mine from a plate, handle and all.

Pasties are a Yooper specialty, but are enjoed in many other places as well. Enjoy. These things are truly heaven on a plate.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Is this different than lard?
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2019, 07:20 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,645
I don't understand. Is what different than lard? I listed lard as the fat to use in the crust. Also add just enough water to bring the dough together.

Seeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2019, 07:55 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 21,560
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I don't understand. Is what different than lard? I listed lard as the fat to use in the crust. Also add just enough water to bring the dough together.

Seeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Yeah, I was wondering too. But, then I noticed your first sentence in the second paragraph, "Melt the pork fat in a large, heavy skilit." When I think about melting pork fat, I think of a chunk of pork fat, not lard. Of course lard is pork fat.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 07:24 AM   #9
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I don't understand. Is what different than lard? I listed lard as the fat to use in the crust. Also add just enough water to bring the dough together.

Seeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I was asking if the pork fat you used was a different fat than the lard you used for the crust? The part in bold. If you used bacon grease or rendered pork fat or lard.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 07:42 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,645
Lard is rendered pork fat. That being said, to add an additional layer of flavor to the pie fillong, you could use bacon or sidr pork fat, and the fond from the pan it was vookrd in. If cooking bacon, or side pork for yhe fat, crumble it anf add it to the filling. I had not thought of that befote and was simply calling lard, pork fat. Thanks for the inspiration.

Seeeeeya: Chief Longwind of the North
__________________

Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
meat, other, pie

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×