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Old 07-08-2016, 10:47 AM   #31
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E coli isn't restricted to tubes of ground beef either. It is just as likely to be present in produce, even in the more costly organic produce. There was a recall in the last couple of years for bagged salads, and it has been found on other products too. If we stop using anything ever associated with such contamination, our options are going to be rather limited.
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Old 07-08-2016, 11:53 AM   #32
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My Best Burger Recipe

Never gotten e. coli from preground meat. We are lucky that our little grocery store that's closest to us grinds their own burger, and until recently, their own Italian sausage, which was great. Sadly, they replaced it with Jimmy Dean. Their home-ground was wonderful.
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Old 07-08-2016, 12:08 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Hm. I've been buying pre-ground hamburger meat all my adult life and have never been affected by E. coli. Don't be such a fear-monger.
Me too.
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Old 07-08-2016, 02:06 PM   #34
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With ground meat products, the two most prevalent little nasties were listeria, and botulism. Listeria bacteria thrived in the nooks and crannies of the big, circular wheel slicers, band saws, and that type of equipment. Botulism poisoning came from critters placed into containers that sealed the meat from air and oxygen, as the critters are anerobic. It would suprise most people to find that ordinary soil, whether it be in the forest, your backyard, or on the farm, contain things like anthrax, listeria, and botulizm making organisms. Talk to someone who studies teh microbes in dirt and you would probably be frightened by what they say is in there, and not just in specific areas, but virtually everywhere. E-Coli, on the other hand, lives in everybody's gut. The issue is that your body is used to one specific strain. When you travel, or purchase food from other areas, and the food has been contaminated by fecal matter, be it from the guts of animals, or humans, you end up with e-coli problems that cause Montezuma's revenge, until your body adapts to the new strain of critter.

I guess that means that when Bill Cosby was eating dirt, and glad to get it, he wasn't probably too fond of the after effects.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwidn of the North
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Old 07-08-2016, 02:14 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by outRIAAge View Post
(I have two words for anyone who buys pre-ground meat: e coli...)
Per the USDA:

Why is ground beef produced in a USDA-inspected plant safer than beef ground in a store or at home?
Hearing about recalls of ground beef products contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella might cause some consumers to consider grinding beef at home; however, this is not a safer alternative to purchasing ground beef at a retail store. In fact, USDA cautions against grinding beef at home.

In a USDA-inspected plant, trimmed beef destined for grinding is tested for the presence of E. coli. However, primal cuts, such as steaks and roasts, are usually not tested. When stores or consumers grind these primal cuts, it's possible that pathogens may be present on the raw beef, and neither you nor meat market employees can see, smell, or taste dangerous bacteria.
In addition, USDA-inspected plants have Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures that cover policies such as the cleaning of grinding machines and the handling and chilling of ground beef. Consumers and stores might not follow such stringent sanitary procedures.

Ground Beef and Food Safety
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Old 07-08-2016, 02:34 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
Per the USDA:

Why is ground beef produced in a USDA-inspected plant safer than beef ground in a store or at home?
Hearing about recalls of ground beef products contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella might cause some consumers to consider grinding beef at home; however, this is not a safer alternative to purchasing ground beef at a retail store. In fact, USDA cautions against grinding beef at home.

In a USDA-inspected plant, trimmed beef destined for grinding is tested for the presence of E. coli. However, primal cuts, such as steaks and roasts, are usually not tested. When stores or consumers grind these primal cuts, it's possible that pathogens may be present on the raw beef, and neither you nor meat market employees can see, smell, or taste dangerous bacteria.
In addition, USDA-inspected plants have Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures that cover policies such as the cleaning of grinding machines and the handling and chilling of ground beef. Consumers and stores might not follow such stringent sanitary procedures.

Ground Beef and Food Safety
I would tend to agree. It's just that I can get a better taste and texture if I grind my own, and use it immediately, before the pathogen can multiply.

The other problem is that I grind in small batches and clean everything thoroughly. If a large amount of ground meat is contaminated in a commercial plant, it affects far more people, and so is a greater health risk to the overall society. If I eat contaminated meat that I ground, it only affects me.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 07-08-2016, 08:50 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
I worked in a meat packing plant in Ohio for a summer, long story, but it is about what one would expect. It is pretty horrific. Not Upton Sinclair level horrific, but about what you would expect.

That being said, we have good controls over foodstuffs in this country (US), I saw some horrible things, and we don't really want to know what goes into cheaper ground beef (hint, involves a screen rotating at 9000 rpm and a lot of animal products thrown at it.) but I have never been nervous about contamination.

Food is a messy process, even if you are a complete purist and butcher your own. As soon as you start to hand that off to others, you make compromises. I'm not saying that there shouldn't be standards, but it is unreasonable to think our ground beef is carefully harvested in operating room conditions.

I also think it is just as likely to get contamination, from what I have seen, from the expensive 90% lean organic grass fed beef as it is from the tube o' beeflike stuff I get at BJ's wholesale.

Now with the tube? Yeah there is probably eyeball meat in there somewhere, I just try not to lose sleep over it. Your Mileage May Vary

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Old 07-09-2016, 02:55 PM   #38
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Yeah, Chief, grinding your own always tastes better. The fresher and higher quality ingredients you can get, the better your product.

I do think we can work around inferior ingredients with vim, vigor, pluck, good technique, and a little imagination. Hence the breadcrumbs, sauces, and spices.

And I don't think we should be that afraid of the ground beef that comes in a tube, after all, I think most ground beef that you don't grind yourself is co-equally sketchy as far as bacterial content.

We kind of roll the dice every time we eat food we don't source and prep altogether ourselves, and even when we do. I adore good quality ingredients, but they are dear, and I never let cost keep me from a good recipe, even if it involves driving down to Chinatown and buying the famous Fish of Questionable Origin, or its beef equivalent for cheapburgers.

Cheers!

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Old 07-10-2016, 03:12 AM   #39
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My butcher has an open store. That means I can see through the big window, the men working in the back, cutting up the halves of animals that will eventually be coming out to the front all packaged and labeled. That includes preformed burgers, seasoned meats, etc. When I lived only two doors away from the shop, every day at 10 a.m. I would see the 18 wheeler pull up and just slide the animals right into the store. Each day was a different delivery. Pork one day, beef the next, etc.

That store is so busy, that I doubt very much if they have the time to decide to mess with what they were putting out front. And every morning at six a.m., the butchers report to set up for work. Yet if you asked for a special cut, they are never to busy to stop and cut it for you. In fact I am going there later today to purchase a 4 bone loin pork roast with the chine bone and the fat cap. I know I will get exactly what I want. At my supermarket, that loin roast would be cut up into individual pork chops. Bigger profit.

Unfortunately my supermarket's backroom is just too big to fill any special requests. And they are not available for any special requests on a Sunday. By the end of the day, the meat counters are almost empty.

You have to know where your food is coming from. And there has to be some sort of trust between you and your food supplier. Otherwise you will find yourself right back to the days of the caveman and gathering your own food.
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Old 08-04-2016, 12:13 AM   #40
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Wow! Really good one. I am so tempted.
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black pepper, recipe, salt

My Best Burger Recipe Late last fall, we purchased a quarter call. At the time, I was sad as the butcher shop made us quite a bit of ground beef. Now, I'm glad he did. I took a 1/3 lb. chunk of ground beef and made it into what could easily be part of a summertime feast. It was a crazy-good piece of cooked meat, with all the flavor I could ever hope for from ground beef. The seasoning was simple. The cooking technique was simple. So good that condiments and bun were not required. It ate like tender, juicy steak. So the question is: how did I do it? The answer is: Keep is simple. [B]Ingredients:[/B] 1/3 lb. 75/45 blend of ground round 2 pinches Kosher Salt 1/2 tsp. coarse grind, freshly ground, black pepper Preheat a heavy frying pan on the stove, or fire up the grill. Form the ground beef into a loose ball. Begin flattening it into a four inch disk by pressing your palms together, while at the same time, using your thumbs to keep the disk edge intact. Turn the pattie a little in your hands and again squish it a little, still using your thumbs to make that perfect edge. Repeat this squish/turn process until the pattie is about 3/8ths' inch thick. Make sure the pattie is slightly thinner in the middle than at the sides, so that as it shrinks while cooking, it will become an even thickness all the way across. Now, sprinkle a light pinch of the salt over one side of the uncooked burger. Sprinkle half of the pepper evenly over the same. Place the burger, seasoned side down, onto the hot pan surface. The heat should be set at medium-high. While the first side is cooking, season the other side with salt and black pepper. Cook the first side for three minutes. then flip and cook the other side for three more minutes. Remove to a plate and let rest for one minute more. Enjoy with your favorite sides. Oh, have napkins ready. That burger is juicy and full of flavor, just like a good steak. If you're cooking the burgers on the grill, pre-form the burgers and season one side of them. Place them on the hot grill land season the other side. Again, cook for about three minutes per side. Remove and let rest. Ok, you can use bread and condiments if you must. Myself, if you have really good ground beef, and season lightly, and cook until just barely done, the completed burger can stand on its own. Just think, when you've mastered that burger, you can branch out and hit it with a compound butter, or top it with some sliced mushrooms, or even a great meat sauce. Me, I think I'm going to quit putting my burgers between buns. Sooooo good. Seeeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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