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Old 06-04-2005, 12:27 PM   #11
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Edited by Kitchenelf - just read post below for proper cooking instructions. Thanks for finding out the right way Constance!! It looks breat!
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Old 06-06-2005, 06:09 PM   #12
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Boneless Rib Roast

Please forgive me friends, but I really goofed on that method for doing the rib roast. I talked to my friend today, and here is the correct one.

MISSISSIPPI QUEEN'S RIB ROAST

Place roast fat side up on a 1" layer of rock salt. Insert garlic cloves in ends, pack completely with 1" rock salt, and cook uncovered at 350 degrees for 1 hour, or til med/rare on meat thermometer.
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Old 06-06-2005, 07:48 PM   #13
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They are wonderful smoked!
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Old 06-28-2005, 09:55 PM   #14
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BT, I've never tackled one of those & you've already prepared the dish...but, remembered your post & bumped into this one. Maybe for next time. See what you think. (A pic's worth a 1000 woids, dontcha think?) BTW, it's from Savoir Faire.

Here are a few dishes that will make you a star with little effort. Delicious stuffed crown roast of pork, moving to brown rice with a sauté of chestnuts and cranberries, then a salad with Boston Bib lettuce, delicate blue cheese dressing with toasted pecans. These dishes will take no more effort than Tom Turkey and all of the ingredients are easy to find. Enjoy!

Stuffed Crown Roast Of Pork

Crown Roast

Ingredients:
  • 1 crown roast of pork, the meatier the better
Method:
A roast with about 22 bones will serve about 16 people. Remove meat from refrigerator one hour before cooking. Pre-heat oven to 450 degrees. Wrap tin foil around the ends of the bones to protect during cooking.
Place roast in oven and reduce heat to 350 degrees. Cook for 2 hours. (25 to 30 minutes per pound)
Add stuffing and allow to cook for another 45 minutes.
Once done, remove roast from oven and allow to rest for 5 minutes before carving.
Serve in crown form with the centre well filled with stuffing.

Crown Roast Stuffing

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb chorizo sausage
  • 1 lb sweet summer sausage
  • ½ cup breadcrumbs
  • ¼ cup chopped onions
  • ½ cup chopped celery
  • ¼ cup finely chopped red peppers
  • 1 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp sage
  • 1 tbsp marjoram
  • Salt and pepper
  • ½ cup milk
Method:
Chop all ingredients except Chorizo and summer sausage, and place into bowl. Cook off sausage and add to chopped vegetables.
Combine ingredients and moisten with milk. Using your hands, blend everything together. Add more breadcrumbs if the texture is not firm. Place in fridge.
Once the crown roast has cooked for 2 hours, fill with stuffing and cook for 45 minutes more.

Cranberry Chestnut Rice

Ingredients:
  • 3 cups brown rice
  • ½ cup butter
  • 6 shallots
  • 2 bags sundried cranberries
  • ½ cup, roasted, shelled, and chopped chestnuts
  • ¼ cup armagnac
  • Salt and pepper
  • ¼ cup chopped Italian parsley
Method:
Prepare rice, then set aside.
Melt butter in saucepan. Add shallots and sauté until soft and tender.
Add cranberries and continue to sauté.
Roast, shell, and chop chestnuts. Add to sauté and finish with armagnac, adding salt and pepper to taste.
Pour sauté over cooked rice and stir. Garnish with chopped parsley before serving.

Pear and Bibb Lettuce Salad

Ingredients:
  • 6 heads hydroponic Boston Bibb lettuce
  • Small wedge of gorgonzola, or blue cheese, crumbled
  • 6 Anjou or sugar pears
  • Pecans, toasted
  • Fresh, crushed pepper
Method:
Wash lettuce, dry, and display on service platter. Crumble gorgonzola and blue cheese over leaves and scatter toasted pecans over as well. Slice pears and incorporate into lettuce. Sprinkle fresh crushed pepper over salad.
Dress with vinaigrette (recipe to follow) immediately before service.

Vinaigrette

Ingredients:
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/8 cup walnut oil
  • ¼ cup sparkling wine
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp ground black pepper
  • ½ tsp Dijon mustard
Method:
Combine all ingredients into canning jars, shake them up, then pour on top of salad.
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Old 06-28-2005, 10:37 PM   #15
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BuckyTom; Andy M's method does work, but so do the others. The first time I prepared a bone-in Standing rib roast, the butcher told me to place it in a 500 degree oven for fifty minutes, turn off the heat and let the roast sit in the oven until cool, and then cook on 200 degree to an internal temp of 130. The roast was perfect.

But then again, I've experimented and found that the roast can be cooked at 400 for 20 minutes, and then at 250 until the meat thermometer reads 130. Again, the roast was great.

The point is; no matter which method you prefer, high initial heat followed by low temperatures seals the meat and creates a flavorful "crust", while the final temperature preserves the natural "rare" flavor of this cut.

As for your grilling failure, like any large, irregular shaped chunk of meat, it requires an indirect heat method. As you observed, the direct heat of hot charcoal is too hot. By the time, the internal meat would come to temperature, the outside is charred beyond recognition.

Next time, if you are using charcoal, divide the charcoal into equal beds on either side of the grill (presuming you have a kettle grill similar to a Webber), leaving a space of 4 to 6 inches between the beds. Light the charcoal and wait until it is very hot. Place a disposible drip pan between the beds, half filled with water. Add a small amount of wet hardwood onto the coals if you desire. Place the roast, fat-side up, over the drip pan. Cover the grill and close all vents by half. Use your meat thermometer to monitor the degree of doneness and remove when the meat reaches between 125 and 130 degrees. Let rest for at least 15 minutes.

If you use a gas grill, light just one burner and place the roast over the unlit side. Again monitor with a meat thermometer.

I have substantial experience with grilling, barbecuing, and fire-roasting all kinds of meat, as well as braising roasting, and frying the same. I love to cook and have been doing it for many many years.

Try the methods described above. More importantly, think about what's happening to the meat as it cooks, what you are trying to acomplish with your methodology. If you do this each time you make something, or try something new, and carefully observe the results, then you will develop an inate cooking intuition if you will. You will understand why various techniques will give you superior results, even if you've never made a dish before.

I posted pictures of a crown pork roast I made, the first time I ever tried it, as well as several smoked/barbecued turkeys. Each came out great the first time, and without a recipe. How can I do this time and time again? I know how meat reacts to technique. And whether it's a fresh ham, a turckey, a Prime Rib, an inside round, or a good old hot dog, or even a hamburger, I know how meat reacts to heat, and what techniques keep it succulent and juicy.


The seasonings are subject to individual taste. But the physical laws of cooking are constant, no matter where you live, or how much you know. My advise to all seroius cooks, professional or amature is to learn the physics of cooking. Then you can begin to apply the artistry that comes from a knowledge the foods, and how they act and react to technique.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-29-2005, 09:44 AM   #16
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well said goodweed, and thanks for the info. i'm a novice, obviously, at grilling roasts. i'm used to chicken, steaks, fish and veggies. roasts, as you so eloquently described, are a whole different ballgame. i should thought about indirect heat.

mish, that pork roast and sides look great. printed and saved that one. thanks.
and thanks again everyone for your help. the roast turned out ok. i reheated it in the oven 2 days later, then trimmed off all of the char. it turned out ok, but i think i'll try the oven method next time. i really wanted to taste the "sweeeeeet meeeat", but i ended up with a mostly charcoal tasting chunk-o-flesh.
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Old 06-29-2005, 12:10 PM   #17
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Thanks for all the great tips.

Question to Goodweed:

Since I'd probably attempt this in the oven (no barbecue pro here), what do you think of the method, i.e. oven cooking - time/temp/22 bones etc? It's very similar to what Alix mentioned. (Thanks Alix )

Thought it looked pretty simple (& wouldn't heat up the kitchen). Other question, noticed recipe didn't mention any rubs or basting? liquids on the pork. Do you think it could go unseasoned? Guessing this is an expensive cut of meat & would hate to ruin such a lovely dish. Thanks in advance. Oh, I did like the menu too. Nice company/holiday fare.

Crown Roast

Ingredients:
  • 1 crown roast of pork, the meatier the better
Method:
A roast with about 22 bones will serve about 16 people. Remove meat from refrigerator one hour before cooking. Pre-heat oven to 450 degrees. Wrap tin foil around the ends of the bones to protect during cooking.

Place roast in oven and reduce heat to 350 degrees. Cook for 2 hours. (25 to 30 minutes per pound)

Add stuffing and allow to cook for another 45 minutes.
Once done, remove roast from oven and allow to rest for 5 minutes before carving.
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Old 06-29-2005, 12:37 PM   #18
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OMG mish, drooling here.

I did a standing rib last night for dinner and sprinkled the fat cap with Montreal Steak Spice. It was amazing. I think the roast pork would do well with this too. I have done it a time or two and my family gobble it up.

Tell us how it goes.
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Old 06-29-2005, 12:44 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
OMG mish, drooling here.

I did a standing rib last night for dinner and sprinkled the fat cap with Montreal Steak Spice. It was amazing. I think the roast pork would do well with this too. I have done it a time or two and my family gobble it up.

Tell us how it goes.
Thank you, thank you, Alix. I'll see if I can find that spice here. Loved the touch of putting the stuffing in the center & all the side dishes.
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Old 06-29-2005, 12:45 PM   #20
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Mish; Two methods come to mind for a crown roast prepared in the oven. But first, think of pork, the texture and flavor. It is savory, but with a hint of sweetness. The grain is less stringy than is beef, and more tender when prepared properly. It naturally lends itself to slow, moist cooking methods, though quick cooking, as is accomplished on a grill, works well if the meat is prepared properly beforehand. Salt and pepper are great companions and work just fine for seasoning the meat, though fruits, especially those with both sweet and sour componants, such as rasins, peaches, plums, apples, pineapple, etc. marry wonderfully with the pork as well. What does all of this lead too. It leads to creativity.

The recpe you posted will give you a fine tasting piece of meat, but it will dry out just a bit. I would at the very least, brine the roast a bit, to add more liquid to the muscle tissue. And I wouldn't use time as an accurate way of determining when the meat is done. That chore is best handled by a meat thermometer.

Here's the first method I would choose. First, when you puchase the tenderloin with the ribs still attached, it will generally come with extra muscle tissue and little bone medallions attached to the larger muscle. You must remove this until you have nothing left but the tenderloin and the ribs. Next, french the bones, that is, cut the meat from between, them, all the way down to the tenderloin. Rub the meat with cooking oil and season with salt and pepper.

Stand the roast so that the bones stick straight up and curl it to form the "crown" with the bones curving outward, away from the center. Tie into shape with butcher's string. I found when I did mine, that I had to trim the meat ends to make them come together in an amost seamless fashion. Remember, this dish is at least half about presentation. Put the foil hats on the bone ends. Place the roast in a shallow pan that is large enough to hold the roast.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. While the oven is heating, prepare the stuffing. You can use a bread stuffing similar to poultry stuffing, or use a combination of cooked wild and brown rice, mixed with herbs or fruit, or even make a vegetable stir-fry to place in the center. It's really up to you. You can stuff it with anything you like. And coloful veggies really have a way of decorating a meal.

When the oven is hot, place a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the meat, to the center. Place the roast into the oven, cook for ten minutes, then reduce to 350. Simply roast until the meat thermometer reads 140 degrees. Remove and place the stuffing between the bones. REturn to the oven and roast until the meat thermometer reads 155 degrees F. REmove and let rest for 15 mintues.

At this point, I placed my roast on a bed of flowering kale, with roasted peppers garnishing the platter. I used one each, red, green, and orange bell pepper. I also had mandarin oranges skattered about on the kale.

The second method will provid the most tender result, but is trickier by far, not the cooking part, but the presentation.

Preapare the roast as in the above method, but place in a large roasting pot, with 2 inches of water and cover with a lid. Place in a 275 degree oven and roast for four hours. Remove the lid and increase the temperature to 400 degrees. Cook until the meat is beautifully browned.

Place the meat onto a suitable platter and stuff with rice or riced potatoes. Make gravy from the meat drippings and pour over the stuffing, letting it drizzle sown the roast sides.

The last technique will give you melt-in-your-mouth tenderness, and retain great moisture content. But it will be difficult to transfer the meat to the platter. I guess that you could leave the meat in the roasting pan, siphon off the jucies with a turkey baster and make gravy in a seperate pan. That would work, but wouldn't be as elegant.

In either case, your family, or guests will be duly impressed with both the presentation, and quality of the meal.

Personally, I like to marinate my pork in fruit juice of some kind, or make a dry rub for it. But that's jsut me. The above recipes will make you a hero in your house, garunteed. You'll look like this -

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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