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Old 06-03-2005, 09:02 AM   #1
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Need help! Making my first standing rib roast

dw graciously went food shopping the other day, and not only loaded up the fridge with chicken, beef, and fish, but she also bought so many things that need to be kept frozen that she took a beautiful standing rib roast (i think 3 or 4 large bones) out of the freezer to make room. i was saving it for a special occasion; not sure which yet. but i guess it's this weekend.
now i have to do a whole lotta cooking this weekend before we end up throwing a lot out, and i'm not about to let the rib roast go to waste. so i'll probably make it sunday or monday night.
i need your help! i've never made one before. for my first one, i'm gonna make it plain, just s&p, and roast it in the oven in a large pan (on a rack?) but any ideas for temps, times, sauces and side dishes is greatly appreciated... TIA

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Old 06-03-2005, 09:16 AM   #2
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Bucky:

Here's a foolproof method for cooking your roast if you don't plan on using the oven for anything else (potatoes, etc).

Standing Rib Roast Cooking Instructions


Preheat the oven to 500 F. Just before putting the roast into the oven, rub it with salt, pepper, and flour.

The timing of the cooking is based upon the number of ribs and the degree of doneness you want. Multiply the number of ribs by 12 minutes for rare, 13 minutes for medium rare, and 14 for medium. For example, if you have a 4 rib roast and want it to be medium rare, you would calculate 4x13=52 minutes.

Place the roast into the 500 F oven and cook it for 52 minutes (or whatever you calculate for your roast).

DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR ONCE YOU PUT IN THE ROAST.

After the calculated cooking time, shut off the oven and don't open the door.

Leave the roast in the oven for at least and hour and a half (and up to three hours. There will be no change in the degree of doneness).
Do not open the oven door during this time.

After the 90 minutes, remove the roast and cover it with foil and let it rest for 30 minutes before carving.


If you're not comfortable with that method, try the Alton Brown method from Good Eats:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/reci..._17372,00.html


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Old 06-03-2005, 09:56 AM   #3
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thanks andy. i'll have to try this when dw and the baby are out of the house. 500 degrees for 50 minutes is definitely gonna set off the smoke alarms.
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Old 06-03-2005, 02:14 PM   #4
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Holy cow! I do mine a bit differently. I turn the oven to about 400 and put the roast in there (after seasoning) for about half an hour. Then I turn the oven to 300 and cook for the remaining time. 15 minutes per lb. I have never had a failure with this method and the roast is always a beautiful medium rare to rare. Good luck!
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Old 06-03-2005, 03:28 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Bucky:

Here's a foolproof method for cooking your roast if you don't plan on using the oven for anything else (potatoes, etc).

Standing Rib Roast Cooking Instructions


Preheat the oven to 500 F. Just before putting the roast into the oven, rub it with salt, pepper, and flour.

The timing of the cooking is based upon the number of ribs and the degree of doneness you want. Multiply the number of ribs by 12 minutes for rare, 13 minutes for medium rare, and 14 for medium. For example, if you have a 4 rib roast and want it to be medium rare, you would calculate 4x13=52 minutes.

Place the roast into the 500 F oven and cook it for 52 minutes (or whatever you calculate for your roast).

DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR ONCE YOU PUT IN THE ROAST.

After the calculated cooking time, shut off the oven and don't open the door.

Leave the roast in the oven for at least and hour and a half (and up to three hours. There will be no change in the degree of doneness).
Do not open the oven door during this time.

After the 90 minutes, remove the roast and cover it with foil and let it rest for 30 minutes before carving.


If you're not comfortable with that method, try the Alton Brown method from Good Eats:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/reci..._17372,00.html

Just becareful if you do this method. My Aunt tried it once and she fried the h.ell out of her oven.
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Old 06-03-2005, 04:03 PM   #6
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How about grilling it? It will take longer but the flavor is worth it.
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Old 06-03-2005, 05:07 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Holy cow! I do mine a bit differently. I turn the oven to about 400 and put the roast in there (after seasoning) for about half an hour. Then I turn the oven to 300 and cook for the remaining time. 15 minutes per lb. I have never had a failure with this method and the roast is always a beautiful medium rare to rare. Good luck!
This is approxiamtely the way we did it in cooking school last week. I'd be very careful with the 500 degrees for 50 minutes... that's an expensive piece of meat to risk. In class we did it at 425 for 30 minutes. Here is the exact recipe we used... however you may not have an 8-10 pound roast, so adjust the time at 325 F. somewhat and check the internal temp sooner.

Ingredients:

1 beef rib roast on the bone, approx. 8-10 lbs., brought to room temperature.

1/2 c. olive oil
2 T. fresh rosemary leaves
2 T. minced garlic
2 T. kosher salt
2 T. cracked black pepper
1/2 c. red wine (and 1/2 c. brandy if desired)
1/2 c. water or stock

and for vegetable trivet:

2 stalks celery washed, cut in half lengthwise and chopped into 1" pieces
1 large carrot, peeled, quartered lengthwise and chopped into 1" pieces
1 large leek, quartered lengthwise, washed, and chopped into 1" pieces.

Preheat the oven to 425 F.

Prepare rub by mixing the olive oil, rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Using your hands, coat the roast with the mixture, covering all sides. Allow to marinate for 24 hours, or for as long as you have available.

Prepare the roasting pan by tossing the vegetables with a small amount of oil and placing them in the pan. Place the roast on the vegetable trivet, and put into the preheated oven. Roast for 30 minutes, the reduce the oven temp to 325 F. and continue roasting for approximately 1 hour or to desired doneness. Use a meat thermometer into the center of the roast to test for doneness. It should be about 120 F. for rare, 130 for medium rare, 140 for medium. Remove from oven and tent with foil and allow to rest for 1/2 hour. The internal temperature will continue to rise 8-10 degrees during the resting period, so don't overcook it in the oven.

For Au jus, place the roasting pan over medium heat and cook the trivet vegetables to a golden color. Drain off fat, deglaze the pan with the red wine (we did it with brandy too at school, but be prepared for a big flambe if you do so) and cook until reduced by half. Add water ( or stock), bring back to a simmer and taste for seasoning. Strain the liquid into a heat proof measuring cup and skim any fat that floats to the surface.

Separate the roast from the bones. Carve desired serving sizes and serve the au jus with the roast

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Old 06-03-2005, 05:11 PM   #8
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Bucky:

The comments following the recipe I posted are sceptical at best. I assure you that this process is tried and true. I've used it many times with success so I don't consider it risky.

If you're not sure, try the Alton Brown link I posted or one of the other recipes.
Regardless, enjoy the rib roast.
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Old 06-03-2005, 05:22 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Bucky:

The comments following the recipe I posted are sceptical at best. I assure you that this process is tried and true. I've used it many times with success so I don't consider it risky.

If you're not sure, try the Alton Brown link I posted or one of the other recipes.
Regardless, enjoy the rib roast.
I have used this method ( or quite similar) in the past too, but I was always very nervous about it because you have to take it on faith. Since you can't open the oven till it's time to remove the roast, what you see is what you get, and if you did it too long, you're stuck with it. After I lost one, I started looking for a method that was easier for me to control. I've had really good success with the recipe I posted above, or one very similar to it. The key is having an accurate thermometer, and letting it rest for the full half hour. And the au jus that you get with this recipe is delicious.
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Old 06-04-2005, 12:14 AM   #10
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thanks so much everyone!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

well, i partly blew it.

i was planning on grilling tonight, so i got the coals going, but when i pulled out the chicken thighs that were destined for the grill, they had a slightly funky smell to them. so i tossed them and looked into the fridge, and that rib roast kept glaring at me. so i remembered a bunch of posts about grilling it, and away i went. i rubbed the roast with s&p, inserted my trusty wms/snma temp probe, grilled it on hot coals to sear it, fat side down first, then both sides, then onto the bones. but i had to keep closing the grill to keep down the grease fires, and smoke just kept pouring out of the grill. it started out at 41 degrees, and i finally couldn't tkae how burnt the outside was, so at about 80 degrees, i took it inside, and finished it (in a roasting pan with taters and onions tossed in evoo/fresh thyme and sage/s&p) at 375 for about a half hour, until it reached 127. i watched it peak at 135, and tasted a bit of the outer ring of meat. it just tasted very charred. i know some people like the taste of that char/burnt stuff, but i'm more of the rare/slightly-warmer-than-body-temp kind of carnivore.
because it took so long, i had time to make a foil packet of tilapia filets in chipolte butter with fresh lime juice and slices of lemon, and then i grilled the open faced foil packet.
also, i grilled sage/canola oil rubbed pineapple slices, and skewers of cippolines that my neighbor grew. we ended up having this for dinner. the rib roast will have to be leftovers.
the tilapia, pineapple, and cippolines were awesome.
tomorrow, i am gonna slice off as much of the charred fat and meat, and i'll report on how the roast came out, with the herb roasted onions and taters on the side...
again, thanks for the input everyone.
l
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