"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-17-2009, 07:05 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Cooksie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 459
Oxtails in Texas?

I'm always looking for something new and different to try. I saw some ox tails at the grocery store today. Do you think what they're selling here in Texas are really tails from oxen or might they be tails from cows? And, do you consider ox tails budget food (they weren't cheap) or a delicacy?

__________________

__________________
Cooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2009, 07:34 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
They aren't Ox tails from Oxen....They are from beef cattle....I don't consider them a "delicacy" --- Budget food??? Like you said...They are not cheap.
__________________

__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2009, 08:00 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooksie View Post
I'm always looking for something new and different to try. I saw some ox tails at the grocery store today. Do you think what they're selling here in Texas are really tails from oxen or might they be tails from cows? And, do you consider ox tails budget food (they weren't cheap) or a delicacy?
Hi Cooksie,
TBH, I can`t tell you as I live in the UK. However, Oxtail is a classic stew or casserole or slow cooked dish in the UK. They are the jointed tails from beef cattle. they require to be cooked slowly so a dutch oven or a crock port or a slow cooker is perfect. Season with crushed juniper berries (no more than 4 per jointed tail) and a bit of orange peel, sliced/chopped onions (browned) carrot, celery, garlic, pinch of cloves, red wine and/or port and slow cook.

Alternatively, you could do an orientally spiced dish using freshly grated ginger, garlic, a couple of star anise and a good glug of soy sauce, stock, dash of sherry etc and cook long and slow.

Oxtail pieces exude a large amount of fat whilst they are cooking. So, the best thing you could do is to cook the oxtail the day before you require to eat the dish. Allow to cool, refrigerate and then remove the fat which will rise to the surface. Thicken the liquid, on reheating, if you need to do so by adding slaked cornflour (cornflour blended to a paste with cold water) or adding beurre manié (butter and flour blended) and added in small amounts to the hot sauce, stirring all the time until the desired consistency is reached.

The oxtail meat can be removed form the bones and used in a pie with other beef cuts or in vol-au-vents for a starter or even in ravioli with a touch of horseradish or beetroot and served with sage butter or added to a sauce to use with pasta.

For me, the essential point is to remember that when cooking the meat and bones, they will give off a lot of fat. Cooking in advance enables one to remove the excess fat which does ruin the flavours of the meat and be left with the rich and wonderful flavour of the meat in a gorgeous sauce.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc



Now
__________________
archiduc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2009, 08:34 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
Cooksie...I "second or third" the motion, the oxtails are probably from cattle. However, they are quite tasty and Buck and I have enjoyed a wonderful soup see post 16, using oxtails. It's soooo yummy. It's one of our favorites and is quite rich. Enjoy.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2009, 10:04 AM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Cooksie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 459
Thanks all for the info. I'm sure they are good, but they are awfully deceiving when you look at them---look like all bone/fat. We're going to try them tomorrow. Hubby has eaten them before, so he wants to try his hand at cooking them .
__________________
Cooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2009, 07:31 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
I've used them to make soups, stews, sort-of osso bucco, and some of the best beef stock I have ever made.

You might enjoy reading this information: Oxtail Cooking Tips
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2009, 08:48 PM   #7
Senior Cook
 
Cooksie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 459
Thanks for the link.
__________________
Cooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2009, 10:06 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,154
I love this Korean soup made from them.


Seolleongtang - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2009, 03:30 PM   #9
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooksie View Post
I'm always looking for something new and different to try. I saw some ox tails at the grocery store today. Do you think what they're selling here in Texas are really tails from oxen or might they be tails from cows? And, do you consider ox tails budget food (they weren't cheap) or a delicacy?
well its like the baitfish we use when we go fishing
also like a perch or bluegill or sunfish

but to the owning person
you can buy it in the stores for an outrageous prices
also called
TILAPIA
__________________
Back Yard Smoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2009, 04:07 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
Cooksie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
I love this Korean soup made from them.


Seolleongtang - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Thanks for the link. I know just about a total of "nothing" about Korean cooking, so your videos are interesting. I also watched the pork fried rice video.
__________________

__________________
Cooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.