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Old 07-06-2014, 10:03 AM   #11
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Always liked Sloppy Joes, but haven't had them for a while. Our quick and easy recipe usually involved bottled BBQ sauce and a little vinegar to tone down the sweetness.
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Old 07-06-2014, 10:24 AM   #12
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I've eaten in a lot of school cafeterias over the years, including ones when I was in school. The one recipe all of them got right was sloppy joes. Lunch ladies always made great sloppy joes.


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Old 07-07-2014, 12:16 AM   #13
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I have always thought Sloppy Joes were the Manwich style. My only exposure to them. This thread has been quite an education for me. Thanks for all the ideas. A quick and easy meal to fix for myself.
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Old 07-07-2014, 12:20 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I've eaten in a lot of school cafeterias over the years, including ones when I was in school. The one recipe all of them got right was sloppy joes. Lunch ladies always made great sloppy joes.

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I have this theory that those lunch ladies traveled from school to school making those favorite dishes of our school years. And none of them had a name. Just Lunch Lady!
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Old 07-07-2014, 12:20 AM   #15
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I've had Sloppy Joes my whole life and never used a "Manwich" can to make them.

Burger, onions, canned tomatoes and mustard. That's it.
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Old 07-07-2014, 12:22 AM   #16
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I have this theory that those lunch ladies traveled from school to school making those favorite dishes of our school years. And none of them had a name. Just Lunch Lady!
MY Lunch Lady's name was Izola Kopf, the best one out there. Of course when I was a student she was Mrs. Kopf, she became Izola after I finished school and she was still teaching me how to cook.
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Old 07-07-2014, 01:45 AM   #17
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MY Lunch Lady's name was Izola Kopf, the best one out there. Of course when I was a student she was Mrs. Kopf, she became Izola after I finished school and she was still teaching me how to cook.
We all at some time during our school years had a teacher that we just knew hated us and we in return. But never a Lunch Lady.
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Old 07-07-2014, 07:22 AM   #18
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Mrs.Wallace made amazing food at out grade school. I could always smell fresh, yeast bread cooking, or sticky buns. All of the food was made on sight, be it pigs in the blanket (with that wonderful fresh bread cocoon), or roast beef, or thick crust pizza, or real smashed spuds.

When I transfered to Catholic school in 6th grade, It was Mrs. Parish. As good as the food was before, this was better. It was the same kind of foods. Mrs. Parish was a genius in the cafeteria kitchen. The list could go on for pages. All of it tasted great. And whole milk was my drink of choice. I didn't even know what reduced fat milk was until I joined the Navy. For a while, I drank 2% milk, but now will only drink it whole.

I loved lunch, and at that school, usually went back for 2nds, or even thirds. And I usually got food that other kids didn't like, think fish sticks, and cheese sticks. I liked it all, ate a heap of it all, and still joined the Navy at 103 lbs., soaking wet. Ah, those were the days.

I often felt that by the time my kids were in school, they missed out on such wonderful lunch meals. But then, I made up for it at the dinner table.

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Old 07-07-2014, 07:46 AM   #19
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Unfortunately, in this area some towns have stopped cooking in their school kitchens. They have contracted to have this business that makes big pans of food and freezes them, and then provide the food for the schools. A lot of Kitchen Ladies got laid off. The school makes up the menu and the contractor delivers the food. Picks up the empty pans from the previous day. The remaining Kitchen Ladies pop them in the oven to heat them up. Then in several school districts that this contractor serves had a major outbreak of salmonella poisoning. An in depth investigation was ordered. It was found that the kitchen were this food was made was filthy and couldn't pass a State health inspection. A lot of the food was mostly artificial. Such as the cheese in Mac and Cheese. Some of the food had mold on it and they would just cut it off and use the rest. Large amounts of fillers in hamburger. Rolls were much smaller than an average one. They were using the surplus flour from the government. It came in 50 pound bags and was loaded with bugs that made it into the final product. (Plenty of protein) More rolls per recipe. You get the idea. Yet they were charging the school districts for top quality food. No wonder the garbage cans were filled with uneaten food. The Kitchen Ladies are now cooking, like they were hired to do. And a lot of them that hadn't retired were called back to their jobs.
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Old 07-07-2014, 08:26 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Unfortunately, in this area some towns have stopped cooking in their school kitchens. They have contracted to have this business that makes big pans of food and freezes them, and then provide the food for the schools. A lot of Kitchen Ladies got laid off. The school makes up the menu and the contractor delivers the food. Picks up the empty pans from the previous day. The remaining Kitchen Ladies pop them in the oven to heat them up. Then in several school districts that this contractor serves had a major outbreak of salmonella poisoning. An in depth investigation was ordered. It was found that the kitchen were this food was made was filthy and couldn't pass a State health inspection. A lot of the food was mostly artificial. Such as the cheese in Mac and Cheese. Some of the food had mold on it and they would just cut it off and use the rest. Large amounts of fillers in hamburger. Rolls were much smaller than an average one. They were using the surplus flour from the government. It came in 50 pound bags and was loaded with bugs that made it into the final product. (Plenty of protein) More rolls per recipe. You get the idea. Yet they were charging the school districts for top quality food. No wonder the garbage cans were filled with uneaten food. The Kitchen Ladies are now cooking, like they were hired to do. And a lot of them that hadn't retired were called back to their jobs.
Yeh, all of our schools use food that's been made off-site. Though it's not disgusting food, it sure has lost a lot in the quality department. Our society is getting worse on all levels, it seems, at least to me. I really don't like the fact that everything is about money.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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ground beef, onion, recipe, tomato soup

PDT/PDE Sloppy Joes Everyone who know me knows that when I can, I enjoy making extravagant food. But those who really know me, know that I also love simple food. Take Sloppy Joe's for instance. I have three, go-to recipes for this simple dish. Oh, and what do PDT/PDE stand for, you ask. Pretty Darned Tasty, and Pretty Darned Easy. Here are the two PDT/PDE versions. The first is DW's idea of the perfect Sloppy Joe: Ingredients: 1 lb. Ground Beef 1 can Campbell's Tomato Soup 1/2 tsp. salt. Brown the ground beef, salt it, mix in the soup, serve on whole wheat burger buns. The first time she made them, I was skeptical. But you know, they aren't half bad. My PDT/PDE version: Ingredients: 1 lb. Ground Beef 1 can Campbell's Tomato Soup 1 sweet yellow onion, coarsely chopped 1/2 tsp. salt. 2 dashes cloves 2 tbs. Lee & Perrin's Worcestershire Sauce Saute the onion in butter, but not quite tender all the way through. While the onions are cooking, brown the ground beef and season with the salt. When the meat is browned, combine the onions, beef, and tomato soup. Stir until well mixed. Add the ground cloves, and Worcestershire sauce. Stir until well combined. This is better.:yum: [B]My best Sloppy Joe recipe, not PDE, or PDQ (pretty darned quick), but very PDT.[/B] Chief Longwind's Sloppy Joe's Ingredients: 1 4 oz. can tomato paste 1 6 oz can Tomato Sauce 1 12 oz. can dark red kidney beans ½ clove minced garlic ½ medium yellow onion, diced 3 heaping tbs. chopped green pepper 1/4 cup dark brown sugar (for Diabetics, substitute an equal amount of Splenda brand sweetener and a tsp. of molasses) 1 tsp. Chili Powder ½ tsp. Salt 1 tbs. Worcestershire Sauce 1 bay leaf, crumbled 2 tbs. olive oil 1 lb. ground beef Place ground beef into a 12 inch covered frying pan and place over medium heat. While the pan is warming, add the olive oil to a 1 quart sauce pan and apply medium heat. Add the garlic, onion, and bay leaf to the oil and saute until the onion turns translucent. Add the remaining ingredients, stir until well blended, cover and turn down heat to simmer. Lift the lid from the ground beef and break up the meat into bite sized chunks. Lightly salt the meat, stir, and cover. Check the meat and stir the sauce every five minutes until the meat is cooked through. Drain the meat into a suitable bowl and place the juice in the refrigerator for later use. Combine the meat and sauce and serve over hamburger buns. There used to be a lady on DC who called herself Crewsk. She purchased the cookbook that this recipe was put into. She reported back to me (because I asked her how she liked the cookbook) that she grew up hating sloppy joes. She had only had the store-bought sauce kind. She tried my recipe and fell in love with sloppy joes. Her husband took some to work and shared with his co-workers. She said that from then on, for several weeks, she was bombarded with requests for more of those sloppy joes. Yeh, my head swelled just a bit.:rolleyes: So there you have it, very easy, easy, and more complex, but all yummy on a Saturday afternoon. Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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