Toggle Menu Menu

Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums

Back to Forum

New Reply
Test
  #1  
07-19-2009, 09:40 PM
I watched a show on the Travel Channel about steaks this afternoon. In it, they showed Peter Luger's in Brooklyn as the perennial top steak house in NYC.

They showed steaks being cooked in the kitchen where they did something that raised a question in my mind.

Here is the process I saw:

Steak is cooking in the broiler.
Cook takes the steak out of the broiler and immediately slices it up.
He then puts it back into the broiler for a minute or two.
The steak is plated and served.

So, my question is this: You are ALWAYS being told you MUST rest the meat for 5-10 minutes tented with foil before ever cutting into it. How do you explain this process at the best steak house in the biggest food city in the country?
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #2  
07-20-2009, 12:31 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I watched a show on the Travel Channel about steaks this afternoon. In it, they showed Peter Luger's in Brooklyn as the perennial top steak house in NYC.

They showed steaks being cooked in the kitchen where they did something that raised a question in my mind.

Here is the process I saw:

Steak is cooking in the broiler.
Cook takes the steak out of the broiler and immediately slices it up.
He then puts it back into the broiler for a minute or two.
The steak is plated and served.

So, my question is this: You are ALWAYS being told you MUST rest the meat for 5-10 minutes tented with foil before ever cutting into it. How do you explain this process at the best steak house in the biggest food city in the country?
i rarely wait to cut into a steak, i like dipping the steak into the juices that drip out!! i do rest a roast or bird though.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #3  
07-20-2009, 01:40 AM
Andy - If a prime steak was in front of me with all it's glorious juice still on the plate, I would just love it but using that juice as the sauce for sopping the steak in.

I am understanding what you say, but exceptions to the tent and rest rule would be relaxed "as long as" the juice was on my plate. Dip the steak in, than sop with a bit of crusty bread... can I open my eyes now?

Otherwise I would complain :-)

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #4  
07-20-2009, 07:39 AM
GB
I am curious to hear the answer as well.
Maybe they had a new chef in the kitchen that day

For small pieces of meat, like a steak, I always rest at least a couple of minutes, but I rarely tent.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
07-20-2009, 07:46 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
I am curious to hear the answer as well.
Maybe they had a new chef in the kitchen that day

For small pieces of meat, like a steak, I always rest at least a couple of minutes, but I rarely tent.
i only wait as long as it takes to put the sides on the table and serve.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
07-20-2009, 07:48 AM
GB
I basically do the same msmofet. I take the steaks off the heat and plate them. Then I set the table and get the sides and call everyone to the table. By the time they get to the table the steaks have rested plenty of time.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
07-20-2009, 07:53 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
I basically do the same msmofet. I take the steaks off the heat and plate them. Then I set the table and get the sides and call everyone to the table. By the time they get to the table the steaks have rested plenty of time.
now i NEED to have a steak!!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
07-20-2009, 08:19 AM
My question was/is....When did slicing someone's steak prior to service become "fashionable"?? ---- I'll slice/cut my own steak...Thank you very much!! Ruth's Chris serves a very hot steak...but as others have mentioned...by the time it's plated, expedited, served, and you're ready to start...it's probably "rested" long enough.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
07-20-2009, 08:27 AM
They didn't pre-slice all the steaks, just the porterhouse (that I saw).

For the other steaks, they put a puddle of butter on the plate, plated the steak and more melted butter on top. Their rule is that a steak must be delivered to the customer within two minutes of coming out of the broiler. They said they wanted the steak to be sizzling when it's delivered.

Maybe the resting thing is less of an issue with dry aged meats. They do dry age all their steaks.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
07-20-2009, 08:55 AM
I didn't see any of it...just passed through two or three times while channel surfing.
I wouldn't think the aging process would affect the redistribution of fluids post cooking. Can't say for sure. The pre-slicing of... or the wait staff offering to slice it for you at the table is "different" ....to me anyway. I don't know what Ruth's Chris grill to table time policy is, but it comes out sizzling hot, and it seems to include butter.
__________________

Reply With Quote
New Reply

Tags
None



Menu

Copyright © 2015 Social Knowledge Full Site

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]