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Old 08-04-2009, 02:53 PM   #21
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Sounds delicious!!
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Old 08-31-2009, 12:39 PM   #22
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Well, we're still working on the recipe, but I think we finally got the beefy undertone we were looking for. We achieved it by adding just a little bit of worcestershire sauce with the ground beef at the beginning of the cook time, cooking the beef on a higher heat than usual, and stirring the beef very little while it was browning. This created some fond on the bottom and sides of the pan, and a little true browning on the beef itself. After it was done browning, I added the liquid and scraped up all the good bits from the pan, and used a spatula to get the ground beef into little bitty pieces.

Thanks to everyone for their help and suggestions!

The seasoning is still not completely right, though. I notice that some prepackaged mixes and some recipes call for corn flour - does this just thicken, or does it add flavor as well? And can I make this by grinding up some corn meal?
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Old 09-07-2009, 11:34 PM   #23
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Try ground buffalo. It is leaner than beef. you may have to add a little beef both because there is no fat, so it will need a little liqiud to cook.
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Old 09-07-2009, 11:38 PM   #24
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Buffalo does not really taste "beefy" though. Buffalo is a great meat, but if you are after a beefier taste I would not think that is the direction you would want to go.
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Old 09-08-2009, 03:40 AM   #25
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hey

Corn flour does thickens it but not necessarily affect the flavor...also if you grind you corn nit becomes a cornmeal and not a corn flour...corn flour is much fine and must be treated with lime or wood-ash lye. hope this helps.
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Old 09-08-2009, 10:48 AM   #26
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Thanks...is corn flour different from corn starch?
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Old 09-08-2009, 10:54 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apple*tart View Post
Thanks...is corn flour different from corn starch?

I think in this case, corn flour is NOT the same as corn starch. Corn flour (masa harina) is similar to corn meal except it's more finely ground like wheat flour. It can be used as a thickener the same way flour is used to thicken a gravy.

In some other countries (such as those with connections to Great Britain) corn starch is referred to as corn flour.
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Old 09-08-2009, 10:55 AM   #28
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Thanks for the clarification, Andy!
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Old 09-08-2009, 12:19 PM   #29
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Think fresh corn tortillas, soft and fragrant. That is the flavor of corn flour, or Masa Harina, which literally translates to corn flour. It does thicken, and I find, adds a substantial flavor componant.

If beefy flavor is what you want, try this recipe out. I'm not saying it's the best out there, just another very good one.

Fire up the charcoal grill. Place one chuck roast directly over a solid bed of hot coals, with the lid down and the vents wide open. Cook for about seven minutes per side. Remove from the gill and place in a covered pan in a slow oven (200') for about three hours, or in the slow cooker on medium setting. Add chopped onion, and diced green and red bell peppers, 1 each. Add 1 tbs. fresh cilantro, and lightly season with salt and pepper.

After the cooking time has completed, remove the chuck roast to a large mixing bowl and shred with a fork. Add a splash of lime juice, a dash or two of both ground coriander and ground cummin. Serve in fresh corn tortillas that ahve been softend in hot cooking oil for a few seconds and then drained on paper towels. Add a few good condiments such as your favorite salsa and some freshly sliced avacado, or some guacamole and you have the beginnings of great tacos.

If you want a different beef texture than shredded beef, use skirt or flank steak on the grill, then dice, throw into a hot fring pan with the onion, peppers, and other ingredients from above and make carne asada filling.

Both have the addition of that great charcoal grilled flavor that really enhances beef.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-08-2009, 05:33 PM   #30
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That sounds delicious, goodweed! Thanks.
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